Search found 2242 matches

by Salmoneus
20 Apr 2021 22:58
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: What are you listening to/watching?
Replies: 253
Views: 15256

Re: What are you listening to/watching?

The collapse of the ESL. There's something perversely delightful in such a profitable idea exploding so quickly and catastrophically. When your company announces its new project on Sunday evening, and by Monday the Prime Minister of the UK (backed by all major parties) and the President of France ha...
by Salmoneus
19 Apr 2021 14:51
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 455
Views: 34215

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Formants: Sounds are waves of pressure in the air. But sounds in nature are not simply pure sine waves - they are very complicated waves. Which is to say, the pressure over time follows a complicated curve. But mathematically, complicated curves are equivalent to the combination of many simple curve...
by Salmoneus
16 Apr 2021 02:50
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: The Sixth Conversation Thread
Replies: 402
Views: 51627

Re: The Sixth Conversation Thread

This won't be a very helpful answer I'm afraid, but: it depends a lot on what sort of language it is. And what your motivations are in learning it. First off: if you were only learning it to be closer to him, I probably wouldn't bother anymore. [unless you've spent a lot of time learning and you're ...
by Salmoneus
15 Apr 2021 23:14
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 521
Views: 41152

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

AFAIK, the Georgian plain (i.e., neither voiced nor ejective) stops are phonetically aspirated, at least in some contexts. And in the Georgian alphabet, whose order is clearly based on that of Greek, the letters used to write them take the places of the Greek aspirated stop letters, while the lette...
by Salmoneus
14 Apr 2021 12:56
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 521
Views: 41152

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I'm sorry, but you're not describing an issue with languages, you're describing a mental issue. I'm not saying that as an insult, but just so that we're clear that the only way to address the 'problem' you're having is with some form of reflection, self-help or therapy. There is no actual 'solution'...
by Salmoneus
13 Apr 2021 18:03
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 521
Views: 41152

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Is there a list of that symbolism or tendencies? Can you provide it? Not that I know of, but the reason things like Nostratic and even Borean can be reconstructed is that correspondences exist. The reason they CAN'T be constructed is that correspondences DO exist. The reason crackpots keep trying (...
by Salmoneus
13 Apr 2021 15:01
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: What are you listening to/watching?
Replies: 253
Views: 15256

Re: What are you listening to/watching?

Update: it's Tuesday, and 2/5 of the trending topics on Twitter are still about Sunday's Line of Duty (it was up to 4/5 at one point).
by Salmoneus
13 Apr 2021 14:39
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 521
Views: 41152

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I think the key thing to remember here is that there isn't actually a pervasive sound symbolism throughout 'borean' languages that makes words for certain things sound a certain way (beyond a little boubakiki and some semantically-limited onomatopoeia). However, if you stare at any random informatio...
by Salmoneus
07 Apr 2021 18:05
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: What are you listening to/watching?
Replies: 253
Views: 15256

Re: What are you listening to/watching?

Just came across Scarlatti's Sonata K. 32 - and it may be one of the most desolate pieces of music I've ever heard. [if the word 'sonata' intimidates you, don't worry: Scarlatti sonatas are single-movement pieces, uner 10 minutes - this one's less than 4 minutes]. I've only really looked into Scarla...
by Salmoneus
07 Apr 2021 13:46
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 521
Views: 41152

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Note that although English is reluctant to put the relative clause between the dummy subject and the verb in the plain "it"-cleft, it does sometimes happen, and you can do it easily if you use "what" instead of "it that" - "what I saw was a dog". It may just be that English has in general become wa...
by Salmoneus
06 Apr 2021 16:54
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 521
Views: 41152

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

The Wikipedia page claims there is disagreement about the meanung of clefts *shrug* The Igbo examle looks like the cleft sentences I am used to. The relative clause seems to modify 'we' and not 'it'. The Finnish example is different, right? I probably wasn't really clear that I specifically was loo...
by Salmoneus
04 Apr 2021 23:49
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: What would the English equivalent be?
Replies: 73
Views: 13862

Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Khemehekis wrote: 04 Apr 2021 11:49 Oh, everyone, I need an English equivalent for prepsith. Prepsith is a Kankonian verb meaning "to eat or drink [something] in the store, without or before paying for it".
This is known as 'grazing'. It's an established term in law and economics.
by Salmoneus
03 Apr 2021 20:44
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Documentation pitfalls
Replies: 23
Views: 1235

Re: Documentation pitfalls

Sure, allophony (or diachronic sound change) CAN happen in scenarios like that, and often does. But he talks about these sequences as things that arise only when you "don't have a phonology", and that in some cases are "nearly impossible" to pronounce. In reality, these sequences may be more difficu...
by Salmoneus
03 Apr 2021 12:41
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Documentation pitfalls
Replies: 23
Views: 1235

Re: Documentation pitfalls

His examples are pretty rubbish, though. Lots of languages have vowels in hiatus (including reduplicated vowels), and lots of languages allow clusters including voiced and unvoiced stops together. Even as a monolingual English speaker, I have no difficulty pronouncing his examples! [I would struggle...
by Salmoneus
02 Apr 2021 13:15
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Documentation pitfalls
Replies: 23
Views: 1235

Re: Documentation pitfalls

In general, I think Reyzadren there illustrates perhaps the biggest pitfall: thinking that your conlang has "less grammar", or "almost no grammar". Languages mostly have around the same amount of grammar, because they're mostly equally complex*. When a conlanger fails to describe an area of grammar,...
by Salmoneus
01 Apr 2021 14:49
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: Old Norse-Cree mixed language?
Replies: 1
Views: 191

Re: Old Norse-Cree mixed language?

I think I often want to recently have done something... I'm afraid I'm no expert on creoles. As you probably know, they're a controversial topic: creoles are all very similar, but we don't know why. The three theories are: - all creoles are naturally alike (eg very minimal morphology) due to the pro...
by Salmoneus
31 Mar 2021 12:24
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: The Sixth Conversation Thread
Replies: 402
Views: 51627

Re: The Sixth Conversation Thread

Today, I used the word "deliquescent" instinctively, in a literal but non-scientific context. Which is good, not only because it's nice when my brain works*, but also because it's a really, really nice word. *I have a very good passive memory, including a very large passive vocabulary. But my abilit...
by Salmoneus
30 Mar 2021 22:17
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Documentation pitfalls
Replies: 23
Views: 1235

Re: Documentation pitfalls

Unfortunately, I don't think it's necessarily something where specific advice can be given. The things you probably have to do are: - explain everything your readers don't already know - don't explain things your readers already know - explain things in the correct order, explaining each thing in a ...
by Salmoneus
27 Mar 2021 01:18
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: What are you listening to/watching?
Replies: 253
Views: 15256

Re: What are you listening to/watching?

But if those instruments are too abrasive for you, here's a third little-heard instrument: the octobass. Often misused and comical, here for once it's played how it should be, in music that suits it...
by Salmoneus
27 Mar 2021 01:01
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: What are you listening to/watching?
Replies: 253
Views: 15256

Re: What are you listening to/watching?

The unique soundworld of the Stroh violin! The stroh is wonderful because it's not really just one instrument: it's an entire (very poorly-documented) family (the best-known relatives are the stroh viola, and the phonofiddle (a one-stringed version)), and one of the last fundamentally different aco...