Search found 266 matches

by Ser
11 Aug 2020 05:35
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English pronunciation thread (Dedicated EPT)
Replies: 7
Views: 121

Re: English pronunciations

Oh, good. And nah, I actually laughed at your post. I get the irony of eternally complaining about YAEPTs, when it could've been solved all along with a dedicated EPT! :mrgreen:
by Ser
11 Aug 2020 03:57
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English pronunciation thread (Dedicated EPT)
Replies: 7
Views: 121

Re: English pronunciations

Dormouse559 wrote:
11 Aug 2020 02:33
A dedicated YAEPT!
I tried to find an existing one, in order to not create YAEPT. Is there any? (If so, please move these posts there. Better now than later when there might be multiple pages...)
by Ser
11 Aug 2020 02:08
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English pronunciation thread (Dedicated EPT)
Replies: 7
Views: 121

English pronunciation thread (Dedicated EPT)

A thread for asking questions about the pronunciation of words in English. I often have questions about what's in dictionaries vs. what people actually use, but even you who are native speakers may feel occasional curiosity about what other people here might say. Let me start with one: "naïve", "naï...
by Ser
11 Aug 2020 00:27
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952853

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

What do you guys think is the origin of the Latin Fifth Declension? I just read an interesting paper on it. Do you think it has any parallels outside of Italic? Was it present in Proto-Italic? I guess this isn't a "quick question", but just interested to hear any thoughts on it. It might be one of ...
by Ser
06 Aug 2020 21:26
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Funny three-initial mismatches
Replies: 19
Views: 266

Re: Funny three-initial mismatches

eldin raigmore wrote:
06 Aug 2020 20:50
MSA Morpho-Syntactic Alignment
MSA Modern Standard Arabic
That one has long been the cause of confusion in discussions on conlanging forums...
by Ser
06 Aug 2020 19:29
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Funny three-initial mismatches
Replies: 19
Views: 266

Re: Funny three-initial mismatches

WTF What the f*ck? WTF World Taekwondo Federation WWF World Wildlife Fund WWF World Wrestling Federation (now known as WWE, "World Wrestling Entertainment", after a legal battle against the other WWF) CBC Canadian Broadcasting Corporation CBC Canadian-born Chinese CAF classy/cool/hill/corny/creepy/c...
by Ser
04 Aug 2020 06:52
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952853

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Somewhat relatedly to the topic of separable/inseparable "prefixes", I learned today that the ancient Roman grammarian Donatus considered the directional verbal prefixes as "prepositions" like the true prepositions... - Quae praepositiones sunt quae dictionibus serviunt et separari non possunt? Di-,...
by Ser
02 Aug 2020 20:42
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952853

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Although Salmoneus' example is exaggerated, I think the point is that English speakers generally don't mind using very weird spellings for names of languages (and people, tribes, ethnicities, places and countries). Just look at the use of the Spanish <j> in "Navajo", the Mandarin pinyin <x> in "Naxi...
by Ser
31 Jul 2020 19:48
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 11855
Views: 1430482

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

In that situation, you typically provide a separate gloss of each word, effectively showing the literal expression in the object language. For example, "Latin" (the language) in Latin as a noun phrase must sometimes be expressed as two words: linguae latīnae oblīvīscor tongue.SG.GEN Latin.FEM.SG.GEN...
by Ser
30 Jul 2020 21:53
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952853

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

This isn't really true, and I'm not sure Thim actually claims it is. Thim's differences from... well, everybody else on the planet, it seems... actually appear to be more about rhetoric and strawmen than about what actually happened - Thim is anxious to defend phrasal verbs as pure and Germanic, ag...
by Ser
30 Jul 2020 20:49
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952853

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Once again, I suppose, English (or "SAE") is the exception, not the rule. As Salmoneus just said, it's natural and expected that this would be the case, since the English/French (not SAE) 'to be' includes so many basic key uses that languages may find it important to distinguish. So I would say it'...
by Ser
29 Jul 2020 20:20
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952853

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I imagine most languages around the world, in fact the vast majority of them, have more than one basic verb to translate different key meanings of English 'to be'. Portuguese and other Ibero-Romance languages have ser vs. estar too. Mandarin uses 是 shì for noun = noun, noun = non-gradable stative ve...
by Ser
25 Jul 2020 01:47
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 11855
Views: 1430482

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Who is the default agent in verbs in your natlang(s) or conlang(s), or those ‘langs you know? First person? Second person? Third person? In English, the “correct” (i.e. normative) interpretation of an unmarked verb, is second-person imperative. However in colloquial speech (or at least my idiolect ...
by Ser
14 Jul 2020 07:40
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952853

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

German has a whole set of verbs with the prefix ein-, and that prefix is separable in at least some (maybe all?) of them. Makes me wonder if English ever had that, or if it was a German innovation. I cant think of any English verbs with in- that arent loans from Latin. I think you would enjoy Stefa...
by Ser
14 Jul 2020 05:24
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Lexico-Semantic Content & Part of Speech [Split]
Replies: 11
Views: 347

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

No, I don’t think those apply at all. The existence of members of those five classes that happen to be light, doesn’t counter the claim. What would counter the claim would be the existence of contentful words not among those five classes. ...... Did I not state the claim clearly? I’ll have to revie...
by Ser
13 Jul 2020 07:12
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Lexico-Semantic Content & Part of Speech [Split]
Replies: 11
Views: 347

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So the only words that are so loaded, are among the five categories that are mentioned (even if two of those categories don’t exist in That Other Language.) What Reyzadren said could still be true if other languages can be said to have further categories than those of your list. For example, it has...
by Ser
12 Jul 2020 01:47
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Which parts-of-speech have the most roots?
Replies: 2
Views: 202

Re: Which parts-of-speech have the most roots?

My interpretation of the question, though, is just that a noun root produces nouns - by a productive and semantically predictable non-compound process* - and a verb root produces verbs, and so forth. A language then 'has both noun-roots and adjective roots distinct from each other' when there are s...
by Ser
10 Jul 2020 22:11
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 11855
Views: 1430482

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Among others, I came up with this strategy (in English): The man give book give woman. Is this completely ANADEW? And I'd like to think the second give could get converb marking or something nice like that. I don't know of a language that does this with ditransitives, but Mandarin does that with ad...
by Ser
10 Jul 2020 06:05
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952853

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

1. Does nearly every natlang that has both noun-roots and adjective-roots distinct from each other, have significantly more noun-roots than adjective-roots? 2. Does nearly every natlang that has both noun-roots and verb-roots distinct from each other, have significantly more noun-roots than verb-ro...
by Ser
10 Jul 2020 04:23
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 11855
Views: 1430482

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I’d have thought to perfect something would be to make it all the way through, while to complete something would be to fill it up. My comment alluded to a difference between Latin and English. In Latin, perficiō was mostly used in the sense of 'to finish/complete sth', and only by extension 'to bri...