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by Dormouse559
13 Aug 2020 20:15
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: europidjin? euroblabla? europex?
Replies: 79
Views: 31046

Re: europidjin? euroblabla? europex?

Zé do Rock, I have deleted your most recent post in this thread because it violated House Rule 3 ("Tread lightly around sensitive subjects") by including a racist joke. (I have also deleted elemtilas' reply to that post.) The discussion of how a word that is innocuous in one language can be offensiv...
by Dormouse559
13 Aug 2020 03:57
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Neugrotien - Para-Slavic lang
Replies: 17
Views: 463

Re: Neugrotien - Para-Slavic lang

Thanks for pointing that out. I guess I didn't include reduction to schwa since the Wiki page "Phonological history of French" doesn't describe how it happened and I didn't really know the rules. Yeah, I've found that learning French diachronics means taking bits and pieces from a few different sou...
by Dormouse559
11 Aug 2020 04:25
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English pronunciation thread (Dedicated EPT)
Replies: 7
Views: 121

Re: English pronunciations

I tried to find an existing one, in order to not create YAEPT. Is there any? (If so, please move these posts there. Better now than later when there might be multiple pages...) Oh, I didn't mean my post in a bad way. I don't believe we have an existing thread, and if we do, it'll have been inactive...
by Dormouse559
11 Aug 2020 02:33
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English pronunciation thread (Dedicated EPT)
Replies: 7
Views: 121

Re: English pronunciations

A dedicated YAEPT! "naïve", "naïvety", "naïveté" Some dictionaries give /nɑˈiv/, the pronunciation I'm used to, but others give /naɪˈiv/ (southern England /naɪˈiːv/). What do you think? The pronunciations with /aɪ/ are the most common in my experience. The main reason is that English speakers tend t...
by Dormouse559
10 Aug 2020 01:52
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Neugrotien - Para-Slavic lang
Replies: 17
Views: 463

Re: Neugrotien - Para-Slavic lang

Given that it comes from *ženьščina with a final -ina, isn't also possible for it to become geniscine /ʒɛnisin/ considering that's how Latina -ina ended up? Regarding -ina -> -ine , sure, depending on how one adapts the phonology. Porphyrogenitos said earlier that Proto-Slavic *i will equate to Vul...
by Dormouse559
09 Aug 2020 23:47
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Neugrotien - Para-Slavic lang
Replies: 17
Views: 463

Re: Neugrotien - Para-Slavic lang

(again, really no idea about the orthography of some of this) Singular - Plural Nom: geniscne /ʒɛnisn/ - geniz /ʒɛni/ Acc: geniz /ʒɛni/ - geniz /ʒɛni/ Obl: geniz /ʒɛni/ - geniz /ʒɛni/ Now here things get more complicated as French wouldn't really use <èn> or <enn> here but rather <ein>, <ain>, or <...
by Dormouse559
09 Aug 2020 02:00
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Silvish
Replies: 221
Views: 40288

Re: Silvish

eldin raigmore wrote:
09 Aug 2020 01:34
What’s the Silvish term for someone who’s a thousand years old?
Milaneû. These words can also be used for non-humans, so you have terms like la reuza milaneuza "the Thousand-Year Rose".
by Dormouse559
08 Aug 2020 23:18
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Silvish
Replies: 221
Views: 40288

Re: Silvish

I like this; especially how it has become declinable. The restrictions on its use also feel very naturalistic. Thank you! [:D] One thing I want to do with Silvish is somewhat reduce the number of recent Latin borrowings, so these derivations help me avoid words like quinquagénaire and octogénaire ,...
by Dormouse559
08 Aug 2020 02:24
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Silvish
Replies: 221
Views: 40288

Re: Silvish

I read about the vestiges of the Latin genitive plural that survived in early Old French (e.g. francor "of the Franks" < Lt. francorum), so I decided that Silvish needed its own genitive plural relic. The result is the adjective suffix -aneû " n -years-old", which comes from Lt. annorum . Just add a...
by Dormouse559
06 Aug 2020 22:14
Forum: Language Learning & Non-English
Topic: Language practice thread 2
Replies: 121
Views: 3654

Re: Language practice thread 2

Khemehekis wrote:
06 Aug 2020 00:25
Ist "hum, hum" das französische Äquivalent für "*cough*, *cough*"? Ich wusste das nie.
Is "hum, hum" the French equivalent of "cough, cough"? I never knew that.
Oui, autant que je sache.
Yes, as far as I know.

C'est l'équivalent de ahem en anglais.
It's equivalent to English ahem.
by Dormouse559
02 Aug 2020 07:26
Forum: Translations
Topic: L'Étranger
Replies: 5
Views: 368

Re: L'Étranger

Here's a little prose poem by Charles Baudelaire which might be a good exercise. Hmm, interesting! It definitely gives one a lot to think about. On the English translation, I think "qu'aimes-tu" should be translated as " what do you love" rather than "who". And the "patrie" exchange is missing. I h...
by Dormouse559
31 Jul 2020 19:41
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 11855
Views: 1430459

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

There's a phrase consisting of two or more words in the object language and a basic root in the metalanguage, and they have the same meaning. For example, I can imagine a singular word that means "rocking chair"; alternatively, in itota itiko "itota itiko" means "language". How do I gloss this? Ass...
by Dormouse559
28 Jul 2020 17:39
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 11855
Views: 1430459

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

** The Gender guy might be Greville Corbett instead of Comrie. But I can’t find it. https://books.google.com/books/about/Gender.html?id=lvy1va7QcuEC Is it possible for a language to have no overt gender marking on the nominal declension, but to have it on verbal agreement? I agree with eldin on thi...
by Dormouse559
27 Jul 2020 02:18
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952825

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

jimydog000 wrote:
27 Jul 2020 00:51
No one ever mentions Pbase ...?
You just did, so strictly speaking, that statement is false. [:P]
by Dormouse559
26 Jul 2020 08:09
Forum: Translations
Topic: The Song of Fate
Replies: 3
Views: 351

Re: The Song of Fate

https://i.imgur.com/wOhuuyx.png Silvish La çhançon dî destin â peu çhanjhê de melodi, mè â s' araetta nonke. [la hɑ̃ˈsɔ̃ŋ diː.dəˈstɛ̃ŋ ɑː.pø.hɑ̃ˈʒɛː de.me.ləˈdi | ˈmɛ ʔɑː.saˈʁɛt.ta ˈnɔ̃ŋ.kə] DEF-F.C song of-DEF.M fate 3S.F.NOM may.3S change-INF of melody | but 3S.F.NOM 3S.REFL stop-3S never The son...
by Dormouse559
26 Jul 2020 04:39
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7406
Views: 952825

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Is there some database where I can look up languages by phonemes or I can compare inventories? I want to know of languages with both /θ/ and /ʒ/ as phonemes. Off-hand I can only think of English and Avestan. PHOIBLE has a large database of inventories. Someone made an search tool for it that's more...
by Dormouse559
25 Jul 2020 03:13
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 11855
Views: 1430459

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

An unmarked verb in English can be any of the three persons (I eat, you eat, they eat). If you mean that a verb appearing without any subject is by default interpreted as a first-person verb, I don't believe you. If someone says "eat!", you automatically assume that they mean that they are eating s...
by Dormouse559
18 Jul 2020 09:49
Forum: Translations
Topic: Don't talk to me or my son ever again!
Replies: 37
Views: 8015

Re: Don't talk to me or my son ever again!

https://i.imgur.com/wOhuuyx.png Silvish Prejhê pu nonke ne mé ne mu fî/guarçon ! [ˈpʁəˈʒɛː ˈpy ˈnɔ̃ŋ.kə nəˈme ne.myˈfiː/ʒɑˈsɔ̃ŋ] talk-IMP.2.FORM no_more never neither to 1S.DISJ neither 1S-POSS.M.N.OBL son/son-OBL Don't talk to me or my son ever again! An object pronoun normally attaches directly t...
by Dormouse559
18 Jul 2020 08:18
Forum: Translations
Topic: I am king of kings
Replies: 97
Views: 50534

Re: I am king of kings

Updating Silvish. The language often forms genitive constructions using the preposition de , but when the possessor in the construction is definite, noble-gender and non-quantified, the noun appears in the oblique case with no preposition. Roî "king" is noble-gender and meets the other requirements,...
by Dormouse559
18 Jul 2020 02:11
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Conlang Conversation Thread
Replies: 31
Views: 1384

Re: Conlang Conversation Thread

This is all about Birdish traditional dance, I want to make it an actual thing with an album too. De koî ke l' i-y â, jho pézo lou ppeutaettre de fèri kalke çhòza kome çen. [dəˈkuː kliˈjɑː ʒəˈpe.zə lup.pəˈtɛt.tʁə dəˈfɛ.ʁi kɑl.kəˈhɔ.za ko.məˈʃɛ̃ŋ] INDEF.PL time REL-ACC 3S PRO have.3S | 1S.NOM think_...