(EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

What can I say? It doesn't fit above, put it here. Also the location of board rules/info.
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 598
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 02:05

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Tanni »

Salmoneus wrote: 13 May 2019 22:47 Do you specifically need/want your characters all to be white?
Actually, no! But the character is a fox who is captain of a sailing ship.
There's quite a few Franco-African surnames with diacritics. Dembélé, for instance*. Less commonly, Kéréku (as in the president). Or you could go the whole hog and have messers Đổng and Biện...
I've also thought taking an Franco-African name. I asked someone from Somalia, but he didn't pronounce Dembélé the way you'd expect it form the spelling. Kéréku also sounds good. Vietnamese doesn't work in the context of the story, I think.
*I don't know, off hand, anyone who had all the common French diacritics in their name, but Marie-Thérèse Houphouët-Boigny came close - if only she'd had a circumflex as well!
The captain is definitly male. There are the girl Thekla, her mother and her grandmother, all of them witches. There is a toad, which is female in German (die Kröte), there are spiders, also female in German (Sg.: die Spinne, Pl.: die Spinnen). So I want the captain to be male. As my protagonist is called "Thekla", the name "Marie-Thérèse" is not that good (Thérèse is somewhat similar to Thekla) for the name of the ship. Here's the solution I found: The ship is called "Geneviève" and the captain "Rémy", so I have accent aigu and accent grave.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
User avatar
eldin raigmore
korean
korean
Posts: 5638
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 19:38
Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by eldin raigmore »

A quick question about the proper metalanguage in which to discuss kinship terminology.

When we are reckoning kinship from male to male, we entitle the source of the kinterm “propositus”, and name him EGO (in SMALL CAPITALS), and name the target of the kinterm ALTER.

I remember Prof Benny Hill’s lecture on English as a Second Language, and I started to wonder;

If we are reckoning kinship from female to female, shouldn’t the source be titled “proposita”, and named EGA? And shouldn’t the target be named ALTRESS?

Thanks to anyone who can explain this terminological confusion.








Spoiler:
;-)’
User avatar
eldin raigmore
korean
korean
Posts: 5638
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 19:38
Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by eldin raigmore »

Has anyone run across words that inflict, rather than inflect, for various things like aspect, case, degree, definiteness, evidentiality, gender, modality/mode/mood, number, tense, etc.?

Has anyone run across grammars involving infection rather than inflection?

I have, often enough to wonder whether they were really typos, or the authors meant it that way.
User avatar
elemtilas
runic
runic
Posts: 2669
Joined: 22 Nov 2014 04:48

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by elemtilas »

eldin raigmore wrote: 15 Jul 2019 10:09 Has anyone run across words that inflict, rather than inflect, for various things like aspect, case, degree, definiteness, evidentiality, gender, modality/mode/mood, number, tense, etc.?

Has anyone run across grammars involving infection rather than inflection?

I have, often enough to wonder whether they were really typos, or the authors meant it that way.
Speaking of nouns that inflict, Morotuncanian has a transective case:

wa-tret-tuer-am er som cuacres-ye er som mate-lolo er-re tuline.
PRES-cut-AGITATIVE.ASP-S DEF.ART INSTR.PTC.with axe-INSTR DEF.ART INSTR.PTC.with knife-TRANSECT DEF.ART-PERS.ART steward

Essentially the butler did it with an axe and a knife, but the knife is what did him in.

Aside from inflection, "infection" is also a thing in Celtic grammar, though it's also called "affection".
User avatar
eldin raigmore
korean
korean
Posts: 5638
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 19:38
Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by eldin raigmore »

Hooray for the Morotuncanian conlang!
Hooray for transective case! (and aspect? or mood? or voice? or evidential? or gender? or clusivity? or degree?)
Hooray for Celtic affectionate vowels!
Thanks!

........

I’m so excited, I might have to go to my medicine case and take a sedative!

;-)
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 598
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 02:05

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Tanni »

eldin raigmore wrote: 15 Jul 2019 20:16 I’m so excited, I might have to go to my medicine case and take a sedative!
The sedative case! It marks the indirect object a medicine (direct object) is given to.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
User avatar
Thrice Xandvii
runic
runic
Posts: 2686
Joined: 25 Nov 2012 10:13
Location: Carnassus

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Thrice Xandvii »

I think Micamo started the trend, but does anyone know why there is such a penchant for using Project <Mineral> as a placeholder name?
Image
shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 7675
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 23:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by shimobaatar »

Thrice Xandvii wrote: 13 Aug 2019 09:38 I think Micamo started the trend, but does anyone know why there is such a penchant for using Project <Mineral> as a placeholder name?
I always personally found "Project X"-type names convenient, since I typically have trouble deciding on a proper name for a language. I got the idea from Micamo 5-ish years ago. I didn't really use many minerals for project names myself, but I believe that was generally the naming scheme people stuck to, perhaps because that was the type of name Micamo had used.

At some point I stopped using that kind of placeholder and started pushing myself a little harder to come up with some kind of native name. I don't have anything against calling a language "Project X", but it's just no longer something I personally want to do. In any case, I don't think I'd consider it to be an ongoing trend anymore. I can't really remember the last time I saw a new language on here with a name like "Project X".
User avatar
eldin raigmore
korean
korean
Posts: 5638
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 19:38
Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by eldin raigmore »

Didn’t she, or someone anyway, also use colors, and/or stones?
Wouldn’t there be a difference between the hypothetical Project Cinnabar, the hypothetical Project Vermilion, and the hypothetical Project Terlinguaite?
shimobaatar
korean
korean
Posts: 7675
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 23:09
Location: PA → IN

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by shimobaatar »

eldin raigmore wrote: 14 Aug 2019 00:36 Didn’t she, or someone anyway, also use colors, and/or stones?
Wouldn’t there be a difference between the hypothetical Project Cinnabar, the hypothetical Project Vermilion, and the hypothetical Project Terlinguaite?
I must admit I can't recall any specific names xe used, but I believe you're correct about someone, or multiple someones, using color names. As for stones, it's very possible. I'm afraid I'm not very knowledgeable when it comes to geology, so if presented with a number of "Project X" names, I doubt I'd know whether they referred to minerals, stones, or other substances/materials.
Edit: I've realized since responding to Thrice Xandvii that Corphishy recently started a thread for a "Project Garnet", which may be what prompted the question. In any case, it seems that the tradition is alive.
User avatar
KaiTheHomoSapien
greek
greek
Posts: 522
Joined: 15 Feb 2016 06:10
Location: Northern California

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien »

I kind of like the "Project X" naming scheme, even though I've never used it. I tend to come up with a name for the language right away, although it's certainly subject to change. ("Lihmelinyan" was originally called "Mantian", before I decided to make the latter an umbrella term like "Romance"). But the "Project X" naming scheme makes me think of tech companies and their various code names for unreleased software. It's cool :)
User avatar
LinguistCat
sinic
sinic
Posts: 214
Joined: 06 May 2017 07:48

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by LinguistCat »

I hadn't really even noticed this was a major naming scheme. I guess I'm a little too stuck in my own head and mostly skim thread titles for things I'm interested in, so names like this would hardly even register...
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 598
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 02:05

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Tanni »

What does the following sentence mean: College wasn't off to a good start.

Does it mean: College doesn't seem to start out well?
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
Salmoneus
MVP
MVP
Posts: 2065
Joined: 19 Sep 2011 19:37

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Salmoneus »

It means "college" has just begun (most naturally that they have just gone to college for the first time), and already things related to "college" (which here is not the institution but the experience) have gone wrong.

Literally, "off to a good start" is said of runners (etc) who start a race well, but more generally it's now used widely for the beginning of projects and experiences. It's colloquial, but very widespread. It can retain an edge of humour, as idioms often do. "Not off to a good start" is 'literally' only a fairly mild criticism, but it's usually used as a wry understatement (though in that context I'm more used to 'not off to a great start' (italics showing both difference and emphasis). The positive form, "off to a good start" is itself often found in the form of wry sarcasm. Either way, the phrase often has a connotation of self-deprecation.

So yes, if someone says to you "college isn't off to a good start", they mean their experience of and/or performance at college has not begun as well as they might have hoped; but it also probably means they're trying to convey the impression that they're detached, worldly-wise observers able to see the funny side. [it also be used without that connotation, with a different intonation... in which case things are probably REALLY bad and it's massive understatement]


It's interesting, actually, because in "X is off to a good start" (and related phrases), "X" can be either the athlete or the race, and by extension the individual or the project. And "college" is an interesting subject because it's not entirely clear what it is (the time, the experience, the project, the place, the people, the...)
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 598
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 02:05

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Tanni »

Salmoneus wrote: 12 Sep 2019 13:14 It means "college" has just begun (most naturally that they have just gone to college for the first time), and already things related to "college" (which here is not the institution but the experience) have gone wrong. ...
Thank you, Salmoneus, for your fast in in-depth answer!

Here is my translation: Das College fing ja schon mal gut an. This is of course meant ironical.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 598
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 02:05

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Tanni »

In English, is there a term called "picture culture"? German, it is "Bildkultur".
Are there terms like "film culture" and "internet culture"? How could I say that
in good English?

I need to translate the German construct "Bild-, Film- und Internetkultur".
This is short for "Bildkultur, Filmkultur und Internetkultur", so "picture" and "film"
are included into the scopus of "culture". How can I do this in English?

Is it "is" or "are"?

This way, the Lolita aesthetics is associated with ...

This way, the Lolita aesthetics are associated with ...

... in the Visual Culture interdisciplinary field of research ... is this correct?

Is it necessary to capitalize disciplines like Visual Culture, Philosophy or Art Education?
If yes, is it Art education or Art Education?
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
User avatar
LinguistCat
sinic
sinic
Posts: 214
Joined: 06 May 2017 07:48

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by LinguistCat »

Tanni wrote: 09 Oct 2019 17:07 In English, is there a term called "picture culture"? German, it is "Bildkultur".
Are there terms like "film culture" and "internet culture"? How could I say that
in good English?
"Film culture" and "internet culture" are both already used. By "picture culture" I'm assuming you mean photography? Or do you mean 2d art in general? For the former, I haven't heard "photography culture" get used but that doesn't mean it isn't. (Should ask my father.) For the later, I would say "art culture", but that's broader than just 2d images.
I need to translate the German construct "Bild-, Film- und Internetkultur".
This is short for "Bildkultur, Filmkultur und Internetkultur", so "picture" and "film"
are included into the scopus of "culture". How can I do this in English?
Assuming you meant 2d images generally, I would say "art, film and internet culture" though that could be slightly ambiguous. You might choose to go with "Art, Film and Internet Culture" to clarify a bit. See my answer about capitalizing.
Is it "is" or "are"?

This way, the Lolita aesthetics is associated with ...

This way, the Lolita aesthetics are associated with ...

... in the Visual Culture interdisciplinary field of research ... is this correct?
At least in American English, "are" works here.

Aesthetics are associated. VS
*Aesthetics is associated.
Is it necessary to capitalize disciplines like Visual Culture, Philosophy or Art Education?
If yes, is it Art education or Art Education?
It's not necessary outside of the beginning of sentences, but if you do it would be Art Education.
Tanni
greek
greek
Posts: 598
Joined: 12 Aug 2010 02:05

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Tanni »

Thank you very much, LinguistCat!
LinguistCat wrote: 09 Oct 2019 20:59 "Film culture" and "internet culture" are both already used. By "picture culture" I'm assuming you mean photography? Or do you mean 2d art in general? For the former, I haven't heard "photography culture" get used but that doesn't mean it isn't. (Should ask my father.) For the later, I would say "art culture", but that's broader than just 2d images.
As this is a translation for someone else, I'm not sure what "picture culture" (Bildkultur) really means. ... (Deleted this part at the request of the author of the thesis).
LinguistCat wrote: 09 Oct 2019 20:59 It's not necessary outside of the beginning of sentences, but if you do it would be Art Education.
This definitely looks better!
Last edited by Tanni on 11 Oct 2019 14:48, edited 3 times in total.
My neurochemistry has fucked my impulse control, now I'm diagnosed OOD = oppositional opinion disorder, one of the most deadly diseases in totalitarian states, but can be cured in the free world.
User avatar
cedh
MVP
MVP
Posts: 359
Joined: 07 Sep 2011 22:25
Location: Tübingen, Germany
Contact:

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by cedh »

I had some contact with the term "Bildkultur" during my studies at university, and it tends to mean something like "(the historical development of) the cultural practice of depicting certain things/topics/issues/... in pictorial arts (including paintings, drawings, photography, and possibly also statues etc.)", which would seem to fit with the context here. I think "image culture" would be a slightly better term than "picture culture", although on its own (i.e. not in a collocation with other "cultures") I would probably prefer "imagery" in many circumstances.

(I'm of course a native speaker of German though, not of English, and I can't say much about actual academic usage in English-language cultural studies.)
Khemehekis
runic
runic
Posts: 2453
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: (EE) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Post by Khemehekis »

Maybe someone who has a Tumblr blog can help me.

I've had my blog, Aaliyah Would Be Proud, since the end of August, and I still haven't been getting any comments on my blog. I have one share (on the "But being a minor is only temporary!" article), but no comments. The guy who started the "adult privilege" Tumblr blog was hit by a flurry of negative comments insisting he must be some entitled kid whose parents won't buy him an iPhone, so obviously people can respond. I don't see a "Reply" button below my posts. I don't even find my blog on Google when I google "aaliyah would be proud" along with "savegraduation". Is there something I'm doing wrong?
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
Post Reply