What would the English equivalent be?

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clawgrip
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by clawgrip »

Didn't seem like a dig...just a difference of interest.

I also love designing scripts, but I don't like designing scripts independent of a language/culture who uses it. I've sometimes made up very weakly derived languages an cultures just as an excuse to have something to support the script.
Khemehekis
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Khemehekis »

Yeah . . . I think Himmaswa's my favorite con-script. I've never seen another con-script like it!
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31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by clawgrip »

Thank you! It's appreciated. I think you don't see so many scripts like this because even if you design a logographic script, it takes some technical knowledge to design and organize a font with this many glyphs. I've been designing fonts for years, so I have a fairly good idea of what I'm doing.
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Khemehekis »

What's a linguistics term for when a word has a relict meaning (the original meaning) that is still sometimes used, but now is usually thought of as meaning something else? Like "want" originally meaning 'to lack', but now usually meaning 'to desire'. Or "steal" originally meaning 'to walk stealthily', but now usually meaning 'to take what isn't yours'. Or "leave" originally referring to a leaf falling off a tree, but now usually meaning 'to exit' (or 'to get something/someone stuck in a place/situation').
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 72,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Sights
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Sights »

*raises hand slowly*

...semantic drift? [:|]
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by qwed117 »

Sights wrote:*raises hand slowly*

...semantic shift? [:|]
*raise hand vigorously*
Ooooh oooh, I know it! It's.... ummm.... uhhh... vestigial or archaic meaning?
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Ahzoh
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Ahzoh »

Where has this thread been all my time being here?
What do you call the "practice/method of sculpting"? Just "sculpting" or "sculpture"?
Likewise, what is the "practise/method of building [physical things]"?
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by shimobaatar »

Ahzoh wrote: What do you call the "practice/method of sculpting"? Just "sculpting" or "sculpture"?
I'd call it "sculpting", but I'm pretty sure "sculpture" is also used by some people.
Ahzoh wrote: Likewise, what is the "practise/method of building [physical things]"?
I'd say it depends on what physical things are being built, but perhaps "building" in general?
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Thrice Xandvii
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Thrice Xandvii »

Ahzoh wrote:Likewise, what is the "practise/method of building [physical things]"?
Architecturing.

What? It's a word... Well... Perhaps not, but that feels right.
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Ahzoh
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Ahzoh »

The equivalent to "making another run out of a stock or supplies", like the kind of thing you do to enemy fortresses to get them to surrender faster.
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by qwed117 »

Ahzoh wrote:The equivalent to "making another run out of a stock or supplies", like the kind of thing you do to enemy fortresses to get them to surrender faster.
Sieging
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Dormouse559
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Dormouse559 »

Agreed. I'd also suggest "starve out" for drawing attention to the "making another run out of a stock or supplies" part.
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Ahzoh
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Ahzoh »

qwed117 wrote:
Ahzoh wrote:The equivalent to "making another run out of a stock or supplies", like the kind of thing you do to enemy fortresses to get them to surrender faster.
Sieging
Ok, but what about in a more general context?
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Keenir »

Ahzoh wrote:
qwed117 wrote:
Ahzoh wrote:The equivalent to "making another run out of a stock or supplies", like the kind of thing you do to enemy fortresses to get them to surrender faster.
Sieging
Ok, but what about in a more general context?
pee in their water supply, smuggle hungry unclean beasts into their grainstores, hurl disease-ridden corpses into their fortresses, burrow aplenty beneath their walls.

as soon as I hit "submit", it hit me: sabotage.
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Khemehekis »

sketetsh

This Kankonian word means one of those punched-in dotted lines along which you can tear, like the line where you tear to get a TV dinner box open, or the lines in between the squares of toilet paper or paper napkins.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 72,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Lao Kou
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lao Kou »

Khemehekis wrote:sketetsh

This Kankonian word means one of those punched-in dotted lines along which you can tear, like the line where you tear to get a TV dinner box open, or the lines in between the squares of toilet paper or paper napkins.
That sounds useful and a little nostalgic (my mind immediately went to a roll or book of postage stamps). Denotatively, "perforation" or "perforated edge/line" probably covers it, but it would be nice to have a word that connotatively evokes a Proustian joy at tearing a paper towel, or a stamp headed for a fond one in the days of snail mail. [:)]

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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lambuzhao »

The perf-edge on stamps is called the gutter.

The perf-bits left behind in a spiral notebook are called Spirobits (according to the Sniglets of Rich Hall).

Tear-line? Perforated line?

I call the perf-bits left on looseleaf 'teeth', and probably my ONLY pet peeve is when students leave those bits on a piece of classwork to turn in. And nowadays, notebook sheets now have that sketesh so that, with a minim of care, no toothy bits. Or, at least in theory...

It really juices my gourd! :mrred: [}:(] :!:

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Lambuzhao
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lambuzhao »

When in need, I found that a deep line with ball-point pen & straight-edge makes a beautiful substitute for a
sketesh. It tears cleanly, and no fringe, fray, deckleteeth, or spirobits.

:mrgreen:

But I like sketesh. That's a good'un.
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by clawgrip »

(sketetsh)
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Re: What would the English equivalent be?

Post by Lao Kou »

Lambuzhao wrote:Various stuff on perforation.
Goodness. Sounds like we have issues. [;)]
In fairness, if a bunch of young people left a load of paper shards in their wake, particularly on a carpeted floor, someone, quite simply, would have to die. (I'll let you pick) [B)]
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