Languages of Medieval America in 3000 AD

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Amine Gherensi
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Languages of Medieval America in 3000 AD

Post by Amine Gherensi »

This is my first time on the forum and it is a great pleasure to have discovered this community.
I am working on a project in which the world has declined back into a medieval way of living and I am working on what the world looks like in 3000. However, I have come across the issue that I cannot work on the evolution of languages since I have little linguistic skills. At the moment I have currently got a friend to work on the language that develops in California but there are many other languages which are not limited to only descendants of English (Spanish and French for example). All help and advice is welcomed and if anybody is interested, let me know.
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eldin raigmore
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Re: Languages of Medieval America in 3000 AD

Post by eldin raigmore »

Has there been any movement on this front?

Might harpin’ Boont evolve into such a conlang as you’re interested in?
Khemehekis
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Re: Languages of Medieval America in 3000 AD

Post by Khemehekis »

Taylor Selseth worked on a lot of future English descendants (Eridanian, Future English, Mekoshan, etc.). However, I haven't seen him on here in years.
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Salmoneus
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Re: Languages of Medieval America in 3000 AD

Post by Salmoneus »

Anglic languages (and other future languages) are indeed a really interesting area that more people should work on. I've tried a few times, but always become distracted. In particular, it seems to be an idea people often have early on, before they get good at it - so future englishes are often quite implausible - and then seem to forget about.

For the record, I didn't volunteer to help Amine not because the topic wasn't interesting, but because I have a general policy against doing large amounts of work for other people's projects with no remuneration - I have enough of my own projects that I'm not working on, without adding other people's.
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