What did you accomplish today?

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DesEsseintes
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by DesEsseintes »

Accomplished a rethink of Limestone vowels.

The Old Híí vowels were most likely *a *e *i *u (though *u may just as well have been *o). There were two offglides: *j *w. In Limestone the vowels underwent the following shift:

*a *e *i *u → /o a i ɯ/ o a i u

The vowel-offglide combinations however developed like so:

*aj *ej *ij *uj → ai ii ii ui~wi
*aw *ew *iw *uw → ao iu iu ou

This makes for fun alternations:

a - ii - iu
i - ii - iu
o - ai - ao
u - ui - ou


Note that on its own or doubled u is unrounded /ɯ/, whereas it is rounded /w~u/ as part of a diphthong.

I’m also reconsidering how Limestone verbs work and am now leaning towards a (near-)exclusively suffixing template with very complex stems loosely based on Algonquian. The closest equivalent would thus be the affirmative order in Arapaho but without the preverbs. Or Kalaallisut Lite.
Last edited by DesEsseintes on 26 Sep 2020 05:15, edited 1 time in total.
Khemehekis
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Khemehekis »

rainbowcult wrote: 23 Sep 2020 22:54 Accusative case: arrWORD
Nominative case: valWORD
Dative case: apWORD
Genitive case: ta,aWORD
Vocative case: lemWORD
Abessive case (without): teWORDte
Ablative case (from): meWORD
Adessive case (at): jeWORD
Allative case (to): teWORD
Benefactive case (before): reWORD
Elative case (out of): heWORD
Inessive case (in): geWORD
How does "ta,aWORD" work/sound? Is the comma a glottal stop?
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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rainbowcult
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by rainbowcult »

Khemehekis wrote: 25 Sep 2020 20:30
rainbowcult wrote: 23 Sep 2020 22:54 Accusative case: arrWORD
Nominative case: valWORD
Dative case: apWORD
Genitive case: ta,aWORD
Vocative case: lemWORD
Abessive case (without): teWORDte
Ablative case (from): meWORD
Adessive case (at): jeWORD
Allative case (to): teWORD
Benefactive case (before): reWORD
Elative case (out of): heWORD
Inessive case (in): geWORD
How does "ta,aWORD" work/sound? Is the comma a glottal stop?
Yup! Most people seem to use ' instead, but I honestly preferred a comma.
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Khemehekis
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Khemehekis »

rainbowcult wrote: 26 Sep 2020 01:46
Khemehekis wrote: 25 Sep 2020 20:30 How does "ta,aWORD" work/sound? Is the comma a glottal stop?
Yup! Most people seem to use ' instead, but I honestly preferred a comma.
Well, that's fine, I interpreted it correctly. The glottal stop is an intuitive interpretation.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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DesEsseintes
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by DesEsseintes »

I came up with some fun umlaut for Ch’eweyõw̌e.
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DesEsseintes
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by DesEsseintes »

I’ve revived a super ancient conlang of mine called Meyyın and I’m redoing it from the start. It’s so fun.

The first word coined in it is

yeyssiig n. - mounted warrior
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kiwikami
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by kiwikami »

At some point today I hit 1000 lexical entries in Alál's noun dictionary, but I'm not sure which word it was. Counting back I would guess either lmuál drought, lumùlal jerky, dried meat strips, or lmalu powdered cosmetics. I can say with certainty that the 1082nd word is ḷuḳuùàum feigned weakness/vulnerability, as that's where I stopped for the morning.

Case declensions:
[Class] | AGT | OBL | PAT
[U1] | lumìul | lmuál | lmul | 'drought'
[NA3] | lumùlaıl | lumùlal | lumùlàl | 'jerky'
[U2]| lmıul | lmalu | lmúl | 'powdered cosmetics'
[U3] | ḷuḳuǔıum | ḷuḳuùàum | ḷuḳuùmùm | 'feigned weakness'
Edit: Substituted a string instrument for a French interjection.

:eng: :mrgreen: | :fra: [:)] | ASL [:S] | :deu: [:|] | :tan: [:(] | :nav: [:'(]
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by kiwikami »

Oh hey. It's been a year and a half and I have work due. You know what that means: It's time for HyPry v4.

Or perhaps Ngaliv ëra v2. Either is fine. This no longer has any relation whatsoever to HyPry v1, which is a ten-year-old kitchen sing monstrosity, but reinventing this conlang seems to have become a tradition of mine and I have ideas about its writing system. I think I've cracked the code on how to finally separate this thing from its Gallifreyan roots. The answer is triangles.

For some reason I can find absolutely none of my old notes. I have no idea what happened to them. Thankfully I have one small piece of the grammar preserved - my torch from the conlang relay in 2018. Since I remember very little of this except the way that phrase-looming works, which to be fair was probably the most interesting part of the grammar (effectively: all constituents are [or tend to be] discontinuous), this feels a little like one of those NACLO puzzles. It's good fun. Like herding stubborn, amnesiac, leniting sheep.

And you know what? This thing is meant to be silly. I'm going to call back to V1 with a weird choice of orthography. No ascenders or descenders. That's my new rule. You can fit so many small caps in this bad boy. This 'lang is bound to be completely redone in two years anyway.

m n ŋ <m n ɴ>
k͡p/ɸˠ p/ɸ t/θ ʈ/ʂ k/x ʔ <c ʙ ᴅ ᴆ ɢ ʜ>
k͡pʰ/fˠ pʰ/f tʰ/s ʈʰ/ʂ kʰ/h <ɔ ᴘ ᴛ ʀ ᴋ>
pˣ/fˠ tˣ/sˠ ʈˣ/ʂˣ kˣ/x <v s z x>
ɾ l ɬ <r ʟ ᴌ>
ɹ j w <ɹ ı u>
i u e ø ɤ o ɜ æ ɑ <ı u ë ö e o ɜ ä a>

Part of me wants to add a lonesome /!/ for old time's sake. I have two cups of coffee, one abstract due tomorrow morning, and no shame. Fight me. Oral stops other than /ʔ/ are realized as the corresponding fricatives (as seen above) word-medially and finally; medially, they are also voiced. Basic syllable structure is (C)(A)V where A is any approximant, though the velarized stop series may not precede /j/. In practice, C(A)VCV strings tend to collapse in on each other to produce more complex syllables.

-----------------

All I've really done today other than that is figure out some basic syntax. You have a verb and a modal particle, and three argument slots which refer to fixed thematic roles for that specific verb (e.g. /k͡pæ/ 'to cover' has slots [1] 'thing covered', [2] 'item used to cover', and [3] 'individual performing the covering'). The modal particle also carries a slew of evidentiality information. Let's make ɜ the indicative direct-knowledge particle. Slot [3] always requires agency.

Noun phrases similarly consist of a noun and an article, which was class-specific, and there were... a lot of noun classes, I think. Articles weren't quite an open class, but things such as titles and honorifics could be used as articles. Thus, xo sɜ /kˣo tˣɜ/ 'cloud', ᴆuä rë /ʈʰwæ ɾe/ 'house (building)'. I don't think they carried any morphological information, but I might give them plurality and some kind of tense marking this time around. Via particles. V4 is exclusively isolating, but also rather phonologically opaque.

Then there's the looming, which is what I called the interweaving of NPs and VPs as a quiet reference to an obscure element of the Doctor Who expanded universe back when HyPry was, well, HyPry. I will never not be slightly bitter that the show has never delved deeper into that lore. "When asked if series 11 would confirm the existence of Looms, Chris Chibnall said he had not read Lungbarrow, as he had not been able to find a copy" well that's no excuse. Tell him to email me I still have every single gosh darned pdf from my childhood and I have had so much coffee I am a veritable fountain of obscure Gallifreyan cultural information. Zagreus sits inside your head. Zagreus lives among the dead. Zagreus sees you in your bed and eats you when you're sleeping.

I remember ı and o, which advanced the argument position within a verb so that a noun was properly placed for its role and could also be used following a noun to give it multiple roles. A transitive structure would look something like Object.Noun - Verb - Object's.Article - (i/o) - Subject.Noun - (i/o) - (Prepositional.Phrases) - a - Subject's.Article, depending on what thematic roles exactly each noun had assigned. So we have ᴆuä xo ɜ , reduced to ᴆuäc rë xo ɜs /ʈʰwæɸˠ ɾe kˣo ɜsˠ/ "The cloud covered the house". Want the cloud to be sentient? Stick an ı in there after it. If the house is covering the cloud somehow? xo cä sɜ ᴆuä ɜ rë, which doesn't reduce.

It's late and I need to be productive but I also just remembered the animacy hierarchy, holy heck, tiny pieces of this grammar are returning to my mind like lost sheep running back to their keeper after stumbling into a ravine and watching their fellows fall to their depths and deciding that freedom just isn't worth it. There were a handful of particles which changed argument order, which was necessary because there was a very, very strict animacy hierarchy which was also tied to formality. So xo cä sɜ ᴆuä ɜ rë would likely not be possible; you'd need something in there to indicate that slots [1] and [2] were swapping roles so that the house could remain the first argument. We'll say that's ᴌu, because /ɬu/ sounds nice. Thus, ᴆuäc ᴌu rë xo ɜs. There we go. I'm done for today.

Edit: I cannot focus on this abstract, I am too excited about triangles. I honestly think I might finally have a native orthography for this thing that doesn't feel derivative. (Well, a ceremonial non-linear one - the linear thread-form writing from V3 was quite nice.) Looking forward to sharing the triangles. They are so, so impractical as a writing system and yet so very retro sci-fi.
Edit: Substituted a string instrument for a French interjection.

:eng: :mrgreen: | :fra: [:)] | ASL [:S] | :deu: [:|] | :tan: [:(] | :nav: [:'(]
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eldin raigmore
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by eldin raigmore »

I found a whole bunch of articles about morphology, including:
* survey articles of particular theories,
* survey articles comparing and contrasting multiple theories,
* articles about order of morphemes in words,
* articles about how (and when and why) the order of morphemes changes or has changed,
* doctoral dissertations,
* articles by famous long-established scholars,
* slideshows to accompany lectures to classes of graduate students,
* class notes taken by such students,
* some professor’s “handouts” for an online course open to the public (I think?),
...
and so on.

I’m reading the first one now; it’s by Marianne Mithun. I chose to read it first partly randomly.
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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Post by Creyeditor »

kiwikami wrote: 26 Oct 2020 07:46 You know what that means: It's time for HyPry v4.
Looks great so far. I am looking forward to hearing more.
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