Lexember 2020

A forum for all topics related to constructed languages
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Shemtov
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Shemtov »

Day 15:
Maillys: "Cośćán" "Cooking oil"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: C'oxcuen "Cooking oil"

Day 16:
Maillys: "Aḿall" "To fry"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Ānhuatl "To fry"

Day 17
Maillys: "Śédhys" "Butter"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Tz'itz "Meat fat"

Day 18:
Maillys: "Nébhyzyll" "Olive"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Ñāihuatzil "Avacado"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
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Jackk
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

18m Decembr
in translation from the 1981 scitation paper for the Dijon New School’s Domain History [1] course L'Art Militaire ès Guerres Romantiques (Strategy in the Romantic Wars). The course covers the 1640s to ‘60s, the most active portion of the various conflicts all grouped together under the label “Romantic Wars”.
Part II: Near Asia and the Novamund [The New World]

Question 13
(40 minutes)
Answer any two of the following three questions.

i) Should the Hellenic Conflict in Armenia [2] of the 1640s be classified as a Romantic War? Give arguments for and against its inclusion, with particular attention to the religious strife concomitant with the Riyalid Revenge [3].

ii) With reference to Vijayrania’s War without Walls, discuss the most popular theories attempting to explain the expulsion of all Gujarat and Seldivan [4] traders from Moscat in 1652 (1062), several months before the fall of the Ibadi Imamate [5] to Hadramot [6] forces.

iii) To what extent was Morrack [Morocco] able to exploit the death of Emperor Cariwasari [7] to increase silver exports to the Vetomund [Eurasia] and finance their ongoing wars with Vascony and Libya?

Question 14 (50 minutes)
“The Mastoiset [Massachusett people] were bought with promises of horses and other protection from their expansionist neighbours west of the Sturgovan Mountains [the Appalachians], and without their aid the British Sack of Santrafew [8] could never have succeeded. Mayor Alexandre fi Marco’s subsequent ban on trade with (and the twenty-mile exile of) all Mendevan peoples was thus justified, despite the 1621 Becouin Treaty.” — mac Harlach, The Making of Mendeva, 1888 N

What does mac Harlach’s point of view regarding the Sack of Santrafew reveal about the political climate of Britain during the Good Game [9] decades?

[1] An academic tradition of historiography focusing on the development of a single “domain”—for example medicine, warcraft, government or agriculture—through the centuries. It is defined principally in opposition to Concurrence History, which instead studies a period of time across all different domains.

[2] The latest of a series of conflicts fought by the Empire of the Hellenes [roughly, the Byzantines] in the East with Arab and later Turkish people for access to the Caspian Sea.

[3] The Riyalid Sultanate was at this time the largest Muslim state in the world, stretching from Iscandar [Alexandria, Egypt] to Medina, east to the Baghdad Exclave and bordering the Hadramot [6] to the south.

[4] An Indian state on the west coast of mixed Muslim and Hindu population under the originally-Turkic Jamishid Empire ruling from Tammombay [Mumbai], and Sri Lanka, respectively.

[5] Ibadi Islam being a form of Islam named for Abdullah ibn Ibad, with Oman (and specifically the city of Moscat) as a heartland but with smaller groups of adherents as far afield as Andalus.

[6] The Hadramot were a loose collection of wealthy city states and emirates in Yemen and Ethiopia, controlling trade through the Gulf of Aden.

[7] Ruler of the Inca and vassal peoples from 1599 until his (suspected) assassination in 1660, the longest-reigning monarch in Cappatian [South American] history.

[8] Santrafew is one of the earliest and most northerly trade settlements in New Provence, founded in 1564. It is located approximately on the site of Boston, Massachusetts.

[9] The “Good Game” or “Grand-Jeu” period refers to the years in the late nineteenth century between the rapid innovation of the Global Workshop and the devastation of the Millstone War.
Last edited by Jackk on 20 Dec 2020 16:32, edited 1 time in total.
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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Davush
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Davush »

18 & 19


teni hand
mtan- to hold (with OBL), to grab, snatch (with ACC)

saripa feather
pukohu bird

Mtanga poora sariapin pukohu
hold-IMPF-3sg father feather-GEN.OBL bird
'(Your) father is holding the bird’s feather'

Mtanzoa poora saripa ni pukohu
hold-PST-3sg-3sg father feather GEN bird
'(Your) father grabbed the bird’s feather'
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Jackk
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

19m Decembr
mamour /maˈmur/ [mɐˈmʊː] marble, (proscribed) chalk, gypsum; off-white, slightly grey
< from Old Boral ma(r)mre, marmor “marble”, from Latin marmor sometimes with analogy to the masculine noun ending -or (that is, from word forms marmor or marmōrem respectively). Sporadic loss of the first <r> probably first occured in the initial-stress variant (see also Maucr “Wednesday” < Mercurī) but had spread to the final-stress variant by 1000 N, by which time the latter was predominant.

Eð vos y grant ouvr ne mamour vis, oc fait de Lorenzo ?
Have you seen the great marble sculpture, the one Lorenzo made?
/ˈɛθ vo i ˈgrant ˈu.vr̩ ne maˈmur vɪz | ɔk ˈfet de ˌlo.rɛnˈdzo/
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
Iyionaku
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Lexember 19th - Yélian

tetmuyats [tətˈmuːʃɐt͡s] - gullible, credulous
Etymology: tet "fast" + muya "to eat" + adjectivizer -ts. Literally "fast-eating", like a person who eats whatever they are served.

Reo quepènotetmuyats yivanarseliet tyilafi can tyavunbet vat cascar o'bela.
[ɾeː.o kəˈpɛnɔ̈tətˌmuːʃɐt͡s ɕɨʋɐnɐɾˈselɪ̯ət t͡ʃɨˈlaːɸi kɐn t͡ʃɐˈʋunbət vɐt ˈkaskɐd̟ ɔ̈ˈbeːlɐ]
1SG.POSS step_father-gullible PST-VOL-really-obtain-3SG credit for POT-participate.3SG DEM system DEF.GEN=snow
My gullible step father really wanted to take out a loan to join this snowball system.

Bonus word :esp:

denunciar [denunˈθjar] - to notify
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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Dormouse559
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

19 lexembre - Iluhsa

ila [ˈila] v - to speak (< *fil "word" + *-a, dynamic verb suffix)
iluhsa [iˈluhsa] n/adj - Iluhsa; language (< *filəpza < *fil + *-əpza "collection")
lód [ˈlod] n - word, message (< *lod "message")

Zileluhsaivóntar?
[zileluhsai̯ˈvontar]
zé-ila-iluh-sa-évónta-r
INT-speak-iluhsa-PRED-IPV-2S.NOM

Do you speak Iluhsa?

Miaivuntaunmi ila ludiaraku.
[mi̯ai̯vunˈtau̯nmi ˈila luˈdi̯araku]
méa-évónta-ònmi iluh-a lód-i<a>ra=ku
please-IPV-3P Iluhsa-ERG word-PL<ERG>=1S.ACC

Iluhsa words make me happy.

It occurred to me that iluhsa is a highly irregular word, even by the language's own standards. When it's declined, half of the root, iluh-, just disappears. Notice how iluh + -a becomes ila in the second example sentence. I want to use the -uhsa derivation for other words, but in those cases, I might let analogy even things out.


Jackk wrote: 19 Dec 2020 01:13 18m Decembr
Reading your Boral althistory reminds me of His Dark Materials, in terms of the naming aesthetic. Here's this world where many of the place and thing names that are archaic or marginal in our timeline became the main ones. This particular post may or may not be the best example, but that's my general impression.
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KaiTheHomoSapien
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien »

16th

bantáris- dinner, supper, meal (in general)

Bantáris is the biggest meal of the day and would usually be eaten in the early afternoon as opposed to the evening. It can refer to both the occasion and the food itself. Contrasted with ábris, "breakfast, lunch", which is a lighter meal eaten earlier in the day.

17th

hénnīr - sister

Example sentence: Those sisters are always fighting!

Jā hénnere únte búnsonti!
this-NOM.DU.FEM sister-NOM.DU always fight-3.PL.PRES.ACT

18th

kirdágā - girlfriend, fiancée

from "kir-" join + dágā "young woman"

pronounced /kir.'da.xa:/

Its male equivalent is kirthéntos from théntos "young man" (cf. Lihmelinyan féntas)

There is another word meaning "betrothed" that more clearly refers to prospective spouse, but this word can mean that as well.

19th

vépos - house, home

There are other words referring to a house as a building, but vepos is the only one that can mean "home". Frequently used in the allative, vépa, meaning "home[ward]" as an adverb.

Example: I am walking home.

Vépa língāmi.
house-ALL walk-1.SG.PRES.ACT
shimobaatar
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 19

Gán Vẽi (Entry 19):

nhěu /ɲew˧˨˧/ (animate)
Noun:
1. sister; a woman with whom one shares at least one parent
2. parallel cousin; the daughter of one's maternal aunt or paternal uncle
3. a woman of approximately the same age as oneself with whom one shares a strong, platonic bond
4. (informal) a form of address for a woman of approximately the same age as oneself
nhěu /ɲew˧˨˧/ (comparative nhěu ma /ɲew˧˨˧ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. sisterly, sororal
2. of or pertaining to the daughter of one's maternal aunt or paternal uncle
nhěu /ɲew˧˨˧/ (causative xā nhěu /ɕa˥ ɲew˧˨˧/)
Verb:
1. to treat as a sister (especially of a close friend or adopted sibling)
2. (informal) to have no romantic or sexual interest in (a woman)

Etymology
From Old TBD s·niêuh "sibling, parallel cousin, peer, friend", from Proto-TBD *sɔɔ "with, together, whole" + *ɲel "fruit, sprout, bud" + *xa "self".

Example sentence:
Nhěu nâ rĩu da lã gản gỏm phânh hō.
/ɲew˧˨˧ na˦˥˧ ɻiw˧˩ ɗa˧ la˧˩ ɣan˨˩˨ ɣom˨˩˨ pʰaɲ˦˥˧ ho˥/
[ɲɛw˧˨˧ n̪aː˦˥˧ ɻɪw˧˩ ɗ̪aː˧ ɫ̪aː˧˩ ɣɑ̃n̪˨˩˨ ɣɔ̃m˨˩˨ p͡ɸãɲ˦˥˧ ɦoː˥]
nhěu nâ rĩu da lã gản gỏm=phânh=hō
sister 1s.GEN to support hair INDEF.POSS 3s.HAB=wool=DIR
My sister cuts people's hair for a living.

Thedish (Entry 19):

andorf /andˈɔrf/ (long inf. andorfen /andˈɔrfən/, pst. ptcp. andorft /andˈɔrft/, pres. ptcp. andorfend /andˈɔrfənd/, ger. andorfing /andˈɔrfɪŋ/)
Verb:
1. to adopt (especially of a child)
2. (informal) to adopt a pet
3. to welcome, to shelter, to provide refuge for, to save

Alternative forms
unorf, andorfed (pst. ptcp.), yandorft (pst. ptcp.)
Etymology
From and- "un-" + orf "to orphan".
and- is from Old Thedish and-, from Proto-Germanic *anda-. Compare Dutch ont-, German ent-, Icelandic and-.
orf "to orphan" is a back-formation from orfling "orphan", borrowed from Old French orfelin and remodeled based on the native suffix -ling, from Old Thedish -lenġ, from Proto-Germanic *-ilingaz. Compare French orphelin, English -ling, Dutch -ling, German -ling, Faroese -lingur.

barnloss /ˈbarnlɔs/
Adjective:
1. childless, not having children
2. fruitless, baren
3. empty of children (of a classroom, playground, etc.)
4. (rare, informal) age-restricted, 18+

Alternative forms
barnless, barnloos, barnlose, barnlos, barnles
Etymology
From Old Thedish barnlōas, from Proto-Germanic *barnalausaz. Equivalent to barn "(young) child" + -loss "-less". Compare English bairnless.

Example sentence:
De childer ward durgh de barnloss cuppel andorft.
/də ˈt͡ʃɪldər ward dʊrx də ˈbarnlɔs ˈkʊpəl andˈɔrft/
[də ˈt͡ʃɪɫdəɾ wəɾd dɪɾ də ˈbaɾnləs ˈkʰʊpəɫ ə̃nːˈɔɾft̚]
de child-er ward-Ø durgh de barnloss cuppel andorf-t
DEF child-PL become.PST-PST by DEF childless couple adopt-PST.PTCP
The children were adopted by the childless couple.

Finally had time to go back and add in example sentence for Days 1-8, the a priori portion of 9, 10, and 13-17! [:D]
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qwed117
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 19th
mi2-ya3 /mi˥ja˧˩/ n snow
thël1-mè4 /tʰɤl˧mɛ˩˥/ n warmth
hő4 /xəː˧˩˥/ n campfire, fire for warmth,
zwi2-ang4 /t͡swi˥aŋ˩˥/ v to cook
khuën1-cay4 /kʷʰɤn˧t͡ʃaj˩˥/ adj excited
cam3 /t͡ɕam˧˩/ adj cold
zòi3 /t͡sɔ˧i˩˥/ adj white

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
s₃ajm̥-i n 'fruit'

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
həːm˧˥ n 'fruit' from Proto- Hlai *tʃʰəːm 'fruit', cf. Bouhin tsʰam1, Cunhua ham1, Nadouhua hɔn1, Yuanmen tsʰuam1

Sardinian
frocu de nie n 'snowflake' from Latin FLOCCUM DE NIVEM
Because today, I went outside and made a snowman from the snow dumped by that nor'easter on Wednesday
Last edited by qwed117 on 26 Dec 2020 03:39, edited 1 time in total.
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

The SqwedgePad
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Jackk
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

Dormouse559 wrote: 19 Dec 2020 21:22
Jackk wrote: 19 Dec 2020 01:13 18m Decembr
Reading your Boral althistory reminds me of His Dark Materials, in terms of the naming aesthetic. Here's this world where many of the place and thing names that are archaic or marginal in our timeline became the main ones. This particular post may or may not be the best example, but that's my general impression.
Wow, thank you—quite the flattering comparison! [<3] Such words are useful I think because they're still recognisable; entirely new words may sometimes be more realistic but also less interesting to read. [:D]
20m Decembr
gyr cottidian /ˈʒɪr ˌko.tiˈdjan/ body clock, circadian rhythm
< from the mid-nineteenth century in reference to the systems in the biology of an organism which are periodic with a period of roughly one day. It is a specialisation from the generic term gyr veunt “living cycles”, itself a calque from Scholastic Latin gȳrī vīventēs, both of which are attested from a few decades earlier. The noun gyr “orbit, cycle” is borrowed from Latin gȳrus “circle, cycle, orbit, ring”, from Greek γῦρος (gûros) “ring”. The adjective cottidian “daily” is a Middle Boral borrowing of Latin cotīdiānus “everyday, quotidian, ordinary"—see the inherited word cojan "ordinary, boring, unsurprising”.

Ig crevoscr a my gyr cottidian enter foutuð.
Last night completely ruined my body clock.
/aj kreˈvɔ.xr̩ a mi ˈʒɪr ˌko.tiˈdjan ɛnˈtɛr fuˈtɪθ/
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
Iyionaku
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Lexember 20th - Yélian

beitneset [bɛɪ̯tˈneːsət] - synagogue
Etymology: From Hebrew בֵּית כְּנֶסֶת "beit k'neset" - synagogue

U'beitneset væ Búdapest yalenbut.
[ʉbɛɪ̯tˈneːsət və ˈbuːdɐpəst ʃɐˈlenbʉt]
DEF.INAN=synagogue in PROP very-beautiful-COP.3SG.INAN
The synagogue of Budapest is very beautiful.

Bonus word :esp:

iglesia [igˈlesja] - church
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
Khemehekis
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

This week's theme from the LCV:

LIFE, PHILOSOPHY, RELIGION (from Part IV)
Spoiler:
life (Monica has a busy ~)*
life (experience of living: ~ is beautiful)
life (fact of not being dead)
life (loss of ~)
life (country ~)
life (biography: the ~ of Julius Caesar)
cycle (~ of life)
birth
childhood
growth
death
past (of a person’s life)
future (of a person’s life)
mortal
immortal
to live*
to live (continue to live)
to live (spend one’s life a certain way)
to survive (in the wilderness, at sea, etc.)
to prosper
fate (what happened to something/someone)
mind (center of thoughts and emotions)*
soul
spirit
evil (of a spirit)
good (of a spirit)
belief (conviction)
philosophy
philosophy (outlook on life)
thought (Western ~)
view
to devote, to dedicate (life, career)
to devote, to dedicate (to God)
religion (system of belief)
religion (belief in God or gods)
to practice (a religion)
belief (religious)
angel
demon
devil, Satan
ghost
God
goddess
god
heaven, paradise
hell, inferno
reincarnation
witch
magic
to bless
blessing (from God)
blessing (by priest, rabbi, etc.)
curse
intervention (by God, person)
to haunt (by a ghost)
miracle
to worship
to pray
prayer
to meditate
to fast
feast (religious)
ceremony (religious)
festival (on holy day)
to sacrifice (immolate)
sin
holy, sacred
holy, sacred (dedicated to God/a god)
vision (I had a ~)
creation (of the universe)
MORE LIFE, PHILOSOPHY, RELIGION (from Part V)
Spoiler:
to preach (to a congregation)
to preach (spread a religion)
ritual
spell (state: under the wizard’s ~)
spell (words to a spell)
to cast (a spell)
enchanted
idol (the tribe worshipped ~s)
oracle (place)
shrine
karma
taboo
candle (in church)
coffin
astrology
to convert (intransitive)
to convert (transitive)
orthodox
Christian
Catholic
Protestant
Anglican/Episcopalian
Mormon
Jewish, Jew
Islamic, Muslim
Buddhist
Hindu
Sikh
deist
agnostic
atheist
pagan
cult
vegetarian
vegan
environmentalist, green
feminist
liberal
conservative
radical
reactionary
moderate
libertarian
anarchist
socialist
communist
capitalist
fascist
authoritarian
totalitarian
progressive
democrat
republican
independent
left
right
Also, mythical or supernatural animals from the ANIMALS section in Part IV:
Spoiler:
monster
dragon
giant
fairy
and the MORE ANIMALS section in Part V:
Spoiler:
unicorn
ogre
goblin
mermaid
phoenix
werewolf
little person
and the PEOPLE section in Part IV:
Spoiler:
vampire
and the MORE PEOPLE section in Part V:
Spoiler:
mummy
superhero
wizard
zombie
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 67,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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qwed117
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Weekly Wrap Up
Like the past weeks, I'm just gonna give some appreciative comments to everyone who participated in Week 3 (by order of first participation in the week).

Iyionaku:
Spoiler:
Iyionaku wrote: 14 Dec 2020 06:59 Lexember 12th - Yélian

vástia [ˈvastɪ̯ɐ] - wilderness
Etymology: From vast "wild" + location suffix -ia
Edit: I just realized that in my dictionary on my work laptop the word didn't exist, but in my dictionary on my home PC there was already a word
for wilderness, vastesme. Well, synonyms are great, aren't they?
I really like this word, especially given its similarity to the phrase "vast wilderness". And it's always nice to have synonyms, especially this one which isn't too wild, given say English 'the wilds' vs 'the wilderness'.
Davush:
Spoiler:
Davush wrote: 16 Dec 2020 13:29 16

sunha 'dog' (OBL: suanhe)

pik- 'to sting, scratch' (IMP: pii- PST: piks- IRR: pikr-)
pingipi 'mosquito' (possibly onomatopoeic with influence from pik-) (OBL: pingiipe)

Pikrauk pingipi omuitse /piˈkrauk piŋˈgipi omuˈitse/
sting-IRR-3sg-2sg mosquito river-OBL
'Mosquitoes will sting you at the river'
I really like how sunha looks. I also really like the etymology of pingipi being partially onomatopoeic but also influenced by the preëxisting stem pik-. I've really liked seeing your work this Lexember.
Jackk:
Spoiler:
Jackk wrote: 19 Dec 2020 01:13 18m Decembr
in translation from the 1981 scitation paper for the Dijon New School’s Domain History [1] course L'Art Militaire ès Guerres Romantiques (Strategy in the Romantic Wars). The course covers the 1640s to ‘60s, the most active portion of the various conflicts all grouped together under the label “Romantic Wars”.
iii) To what extent was Morrack [Morocco] able to exploit the death of Emperor Cariwasari [7] to increase silver exports to the Vetomund [Eurasia] and finance their ongoing wars with Vascony and Libya?
...
[7] Ruler of the Inca and vassal peoples from 1599 until his (suspected) assassination in 1660, the longest-reigning monarch in Cappatian [South American] history.
I said last week that it's interesting seeing the Boralverse snippets, but I think this aspect of Boralverse is really cool; that it appears that there were less Eurocentric relations between the New World and Old World. Kinda interested to find out what precisely happens in Sahul and in the Americas. Even the date of the American-Old World Interchange must be very different in Boralverse.
Shemtov:
Spoiler:
Shemtov wrote: 18 Dec 2020 21:54 Day 15:
Maillys: "Cośćán" "Cooking oil"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: C'oxcuen "Cooking oil"

Day 16:
Maillys: "Aḿall" "To fry"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Ānhuatl "To fry"

Day 17
Maillys: "Śédhys" "Butter"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Tz'itz "Meat fat"

Day 18:
Maillys: "Nébhyzyll" "Olive"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Ñāihuatzil "Avacado"
It's interesting to see the development of these words. I wonder if you're reconstructing from a particular proto-word, or if you're applying some sort of standard correspondences in order to make the words. Either way, it seems very interesting, and I can't wait to see more.
spanick:
Spoiler:
spanick wrote: 17 Dec 2020 16:30
Khemehekis wrote: 17 Dec 2020 06:27 You're welcome. And I see you added some cousin terms.

What do you call nieces and nephews who are your spouse's sibling's children?
Good question! I don't know yet.

Edit: I actually got this mixed up. The children of one's same sex sibling and of your spouse's same sex sibling are your sons/daughters. The children of one's and one's spouse's opposite sex sibling are your nieces and nephews.

Lexember 17

Yemya

So, as I developed this more, I realized that I actually had an Iroquois kinship system I had in mind. As a reminder: a parallel cousin is the child of your parents' same sex sibling (paternal uncle/maternal aunt) while a cross cousin is every other kind of cousin, this includes first cousins if they're the children of your parents' opposite sex sibling. I've repeated some terms from before both to give them more refined meanings and also to show the whole system a little better.

Extended Family
phatrauya/pʰɑtɾaujɑ/ (n.) ‘paternal uncle’
phatraya/pʰɑtɾɑjɑ/ (n.) ‘paternal aunt’
matra /mɑtɾɑ/ (n.) ‘maternal aunt’
matratha/mɑtɾɑtʰɑ/ (n.) ‘maternal uncle’
brathar /bɾɑtʰɑr/ (n.) ‘brother, male parallel cousin’
svasar /sʋɑsɑr/ ‘sister, female parallel cousin’
jnayana /ʝnɑjɑnɑ/ (n.) ‘male cross cousin’
jnayanya /ʝnɑjɑnɑ/ (n.) ‘female cross cousin’

In-Laws
sveśura /sʋeɕurɑ/ (n.) ‘father-in-law’
svaśrau /sʋɑɕɾau/ (n.) ‘mother-in-law’
svaśura /sʋɑɕurɑ/ (n.) ‘brother-in-law (wife’s brother)’
svaśya /sʋɑɕjɑ/ (n.) ‘sister-in-law (wife’s sister)’
taivar /taiʋɑr/ (n.) ‘brother-in-law (husband’s brother)’
juśwa /ʝuɕʋɑ/ (n.) ‘sister-in-law (husband’s sister)’
I really like seeing this development of the familial system. This is really interesting, and I'd like to find out where the differences between sveśura, svaśrau and svaśya come from. They all look distinctly related to PIE swesor-, so I'm interested to see how that became 'father in law' 'mother in law' and 'sister in law'
shimobaatar:
Spoiler:
shimobaatar wrote: 16 Dec 2020 12:14 Day 16

Gán Vẽi (Entry 16):

phéi /pʰej˩˧/ (inanimate)
Noun:
1. door
2. doorway, entrance
3. gate
4. (rare) window
5. hatch, flap, lid, covering
6. opening, hole (in a jar or box)
7. port, harbor
8. (figurative) opportunity, chance
9. prologue, beginning, start, opening (of a story)
10. (figurative) gateway, stepping stone
phéi /pʰej˩˧/ (comparative phéi ma /pʰej˩˧ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. of or pertaining to doors, gates, entrances
2. of or pertaining to lids, hatches, openings
3. of or pertaining to ports, harbors
4. (figurative) opportune, fortuitous, convenient, lucky
5. opening, early, beginning, starting, initial (of a part of a story)
6. (figurative) intermediary
phéi /pʰej˩˧/ (causative xā phéi /ɕa˥ pʰej˩˧/)
Verb:
1. to enter, to cross a threshold
2. to arrive
3. to open, to uncover
4. to dock (of a ship)

Etymology
From Old TBD prêêh "to cross, to traverse, to enter, to exit", from Proto-TBD *pɯs "hole, hollow, opening, gap" + *rees "to leave, to depart, to disappear, to die".
I really like how you're making etymologies for the language. The loss of the initial rhotic between prêêh and phéi reminds me of the change between Sanskrit भ्रातृ (bhrā́tṛ) and Hindi भाई (bhāī).
Dormouse559:
Spoiler:
Dormouse559 wrote: 17 Dec 2020 22:36 17 lexembre - Iluhsa

héinin [ˈhei̯nin] n - child; offspring or young human (irregular PL: heiniézza; < *poine "birth" + *-en "product of")

Koubžimzar heiniénara.
[kou̯bˈʒimzar hei̯ˈni̯enara]
kòub-žim-za-r heinién-a-za
love.ABS-1S.GEN-PRED-COP children-ERG-PRED

I love my children.


I stumbled across a concept for a Silvish word that I came up with in 2013 and then forgot about. Here's the updated form:

Image Silvish

entreçhampâ [ʔɛ̃n.tʁe.hɑ̃ˈpɑː] v - to throw something that will later be retrieved

Lou ppeççheû entreçhampezirön leu ttisuvon.
[lup.pɛˈhœː ʔɛ̃n.tʁe.hɑ̃m.pəˈzi.ʁŋ̩ lœt.ti.syˈvɔ̃ŋ]
DEF-M.C.PL PL-fisherman cast-PST-3P 3P.POS PL-net

The fishermen cast their nets.

Çhakko jhoer jh' entreçhampo la balla avek mui çhen.
[hɑk.kəˈʒuʁ ʒɛ̃n.tʁəˈhɑ̃m.pə laˈbɑl.la ʔaˈvɛk mjyˈhɛ̃ŋ]
every-M.C day 1S.NOM throw-1S DEF-F ball with 1S-POS.OBL dog

I play fetch with my dog every day.

I also had ideas for the word's metaphorical uses in 2013, but I want to let those marinate a bit longer.
I really like the words in Ilhusa and its etymology, with /p/ > /h/ change (presumably through an intermediary /ɸ/). I also find the new look of Silvish to be interesting, especially with the new initial plural gemination. I've really loved seeing these two over the course of the month!
KaiTheHomoSapien:
Spoiler:
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 19 Dec 2020 21:31 19th

vépos - house, home

There are other words referring to a house as a building, but vepos is the only one that can mean "home". Frequently used in the allative, vépa, meaning "home[ward]" as an adverb.

Example: I am walking home.

Vépa língāmi.
house-ALL walk-1.SG.PRES.ACT
For some reason vépos distinctly reminds me of Finnish and Estonian, so I think it's pretty cool that it's primarily used in the allative. I love the mix of aesthetics this language is developing.

Lexember 20th
mèt3-ang2 /mɛt˧˩aŋ˥/ v to believe in, to trust, to have faith in generally said of people, institutions or processes, not generally of religious figures or religions

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
h₂eːs₂om-i v 'to pray, to orate, to say'

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
tʰeŋ˨˩ n 'dragon' from Proto- Hlai *hnəŋ 'dragon', cf. Bouhin noŋ1, Zandui thaŋ4, Nadouhua taŋʔ4

Sardinian
pregare v 'to pray' from Latin precare, I suspect, possibly through an Italian intermediary, given that the dominant form is precare, with no intervocalic voicing

ti prego bona fortuna!
I wish you good luck!
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

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Davush
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Davush »

20th

sasap 'a type of grain' (likely a loan: a number of nouns of the form CVCV-C with an initial reduplicated syllable and final stop appear, but nowhere else in the language)

sasapatsi 'an ear of grain'

nanzasap 'field for growing grain (nan 'place, house' + sasap)

panzuma 'table, flat surface' (probably from panzu which is a type of wood, + ma suffix, currently unknown function)

Mtanian sasapatsi momea niro nanzasap ira
hold-PST-1sg-3sg ear.of.grain much from-that.3sg table that
'I grabbed many ears of grain from that wheat-field'
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 20

Gán Vẽi (Entry 20):

bỏu /ɓow˨˩˨/ (inanimate or animate)
Noun:
1. (inanimate) heaven; the abode of the gods
2. (animate, collective) the gods
3. (inanimate) heaven, paradise, (pleasant) afterlife
4. (animate) firmament, vault of heaven, celestial sphere
5. (animate, archaic) sky, air, atmosphere, weather
6. (inanimate, informal) bliss, joy, ecstasy
7. (animate, collective, informal, sarcastic) bureaucrats, administrators, staff, court
8. (inanimate, informal) a period of good weather
9. (inanimate, informal) oasis, glade, clearing (in a forest), valley (among mountains), mountain pass
bỏu /ɓow˨˩˨/ (comparative bỏu ma /ɓow˨˩˨ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. heavenly; of or pertaining to heaven
2. godly; of or pertaining to the gods
3. of or pertaining to a pleasant afterlife
4. heavenly, celestial, astronomical, stellar, astral, planetary
5. (archaic) of or pertaining to the sky or weather
6. (informal) blissful, joyous, ecstatic
7. (informal, sarcastic) bureaucratic, administrative, courtly
8. (informal) balmy, calm, nice, peaceful, mild, good, pleasant (of weather)
9. (informal) of or pertaining to oases, glades, clearings, valleys
bỏu /ɓow˨˩˨/ (causative xā bỏu /ɕa˥ ɓow˨˩˨/)
Verb:
1. to reign, to work, to act (of the gods)
2. (polite) to be dead
3. (rare) to move (of celestial bodies)
4. (rare, archaic) to occur (of weather)
5. (informal) to be in a state of bliss, to relax
6. (informal, sarcastic) to govern, to administer, to oversee
7. (informal) to be mild, to be pleasant (of weather)
8. (rare, informal) to take advantage of an oasis or mountain pass while traveling
9. (informal, humorous) to do good deeds for selfish reasons, to try to get into heaven
bỏu /ɓow˨˩˨/
Preposition:
1. (dated, poetic) above, over; higher up than
2. (dated, poetic) over; across, crossing, spanning
3. (dated, poetic) over; covering, on top of
4. (dated, poetic) above, over; surpassing, exceeding

Etymology
From Old TBD bôu "paradise, heaven, sky", from Proto-TBD *bow "sky, heaven".

Example sentence:
Vín gỏu bỏu gá.
/vin˩˧ ɣow˨˩˨ ɓow˨˩˨ ɣa˩˧/
[ʋɪ̃n̪˩˧ ɣɔw˨˩˨ ɓɔw˨˩˨ ɣaː˩˧]
vín gỏu=bỏu=gá
ancestor 3s=heaven=INFER
Grandpa probably got into heaven, I figure.

Thedish (Entry 20):

zodiaque /zɔˈdjaːk/ (plural zodiaques /zɔˈdjaːk(ə)s/)
Noun:
1. astrology
2. (informal) divination, fortune-telling
3. (informal) pseudoscience
4. horoscope
5. (rare) ecliptic; the apparent annual path of the sun
6. the zodiac
7. zodiac sign

Alternative forms
zodiaec, zodiaek, zodiake, zodjaque
Etymology
Borrowed from Old French zodiaque, from Latin zōdiacus. Compare English zodiac, French zodiaque, Dutch zodiak.
Usage notes
Senses 1-3 and 5 are typically uncountable, while Senses 4 and 7 are typically countable. Sense 6 may be countable when discussing, for instance, the "zodiacs" of different cultures.

chirkel /ˈt͡ʃɪrkəl/ (plural chirkels /ˈt͡ʃɪrkəls/)
Noun:
1. the zodiac
2. zodiac sign
3. (rare) ecliptic; the apparent annual path of the sun
4. (rare) orbit
5. (rare) cycle
6. (archaic) calendar

Alternative forms
chircle
Etymology
From Old Thedish ċircol, borrowed from Latin circulus, possibly via Old English ċircul. Compare English circle, French cercle, Afrikaans sirkel, Swedish cirkel, Welsh cylch, Irish ciorcal. Doublet of cerkel /ˈsɛrkəl/ "circle (especially in geometry)".

Example sentence:
Y does neut in de zodiaque beloiven, dow y does myn chirkel teken nuw witen.
/ʌɪ̯ duːs nœt ɪn də zɔˈdjaːk bɛˈlɔɪ̯vən | dɔʊ̯ ʌɪ̯ duːs mʌɪ̯n ˈt͡ʃɪrkəl ˈteːkən nɔʊ̯ ˈwiːtən/
[ʔe dʊs nət‿ɨ̃n‿nə zoˈd͡ʒaːk̚ bəˈlɔɪ̯və̃n | do ʔe ˈduːs mẽn ˈt͡ʃɪɾkəɫ ˈtʰeːkə̃n no ˈwiːtə̃n]
y doe-s neut in de zodiaque beloive-en, dow y doe-s myn chirkel teken nuw wit-en
1s.NOM do.PRES-PRES NEG in DEF astrology believe-L.INF, though 1s.NOM do.PRES-PRES 1s.GEN zodiac sign still know-L.INF
I don't believe in astrology, but I do still know my zodiac sign.

Khemehekis wrote: 20 Dec 2020 23:58 This week's theme from the LCV:
What is this, by the way? I think you might have done it last year, too?

qwed117 wrote: 21 Dec 2020 00:12
shimobaatar wrote: 16 Dec 2020 12:14 Etymology
From Old TBD prêêh "to cross, to traverse, to enter, to exit", from Proto-TBD *pɯs "hole, hollow, opening, gap" + *rees "to leave, to depart, to disappear, to die".
I really like how you're making etymologies for the language. The loss of the initial rhotic between prêêh and phéi reminds me of the change between Sanskrit भ्रातृ (bhrā́tṛ) and Hindi भाई (bhāī).
Thanks! What's going on here is something like [pɻ] > [pɻ̊] > [pʂ] > [pʰ].
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Dormouse559
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

20 lexembre - Iluhsa

Not much on Iluhsa for today. Related to this week's theme, I imagine the speakers have or had a focus on the moon. I've decided the language should have a base-14 number system because that's roughly half the number of days in the sidereal month, and the moon's been on my mind lately. BTW, "tetradecimal" is a crime against Greek and Latin.


However, I do have some more detailed conculture thoughts for Image Silvish

l' Antonjhe / le Tant' Onjhe [lɑ̃ˈtɔ̃ɲ̟.ʒə | le.tɑ̃ˈtɔ̃ɲ̟.ʒə] - the Antonjhe

The Antonjhe or Tant' Onjhe is a spirit or witch said to frequent the valleys and mountain passes of Silvia. Legends portray her variously as a guardian of travelers or as a deadly menace to them. If you get on her good side, she gives you a seemingly unremarkable gift, like an old boot, that fills with gold when you reach your destination. If you displease her, she traps you in a diabolically complex maze; this behavior explains why she is also called le dona dî labirinto "the lady of the labyrinth". Folk etymologies connect the name Antonjhe with the given name Antoinye (Antonia). Meanwhile, Tant' Onjhe literally means "Aunt Onjhe". However, archeologists have disputed these explanations, linking the Antonjhe to inscriptions found around the region dedicated to the Gaulish goddess Imbetogmia (imbeto- "many" + ogmos "path"; "She of many paths"); they hypothesize that Imbetogmia was a mountain deity, with the labyrinth symbolizing the Alps. The Antonjhe's gifts of money may continue associations with trade, a major element of historical life in the Tarentaise and surrounding valleys.


Jackk wrote: 20 Dec 2020 16:38 Wow, thank you—quite the flattering comparison! [<3] Such words are useful I think because they're still recognisable; entirely new words may sometimes be more realistic but also less interesting to read. [:D]
You know, I hadn't thought about it from the familiarity angle. That makes a lot of sense. Still, considering that many of the names we prefer over others have come about due to extremely arbitrary historical events, I wouldn't be surprised to see a lot of recognizable alternates becoming prominent elsewhere in the multiverse, where those events tipped the other way or just never happened. [:)]
qwed117 wrote: 21 Dec 2020 00:12 I really like the words in Ilhusa and its etymology, with /p/ > /h/ change (presumably through an intermediary /ɸ/).
That's correct! Iluhsa does not like voiceless labials and has mercilessly debuccalized them.
qwed117 wrote:I also find the new look of Silvish to be interesting, especially with the new initial plural gemination. I've really loved seeing these two over the course of the month!
Thank you :mrgreen:
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

shimobaatar wrote: 21 Dec 2020 01:35
Khemehekis wrote: 20 Dec 2020 23:58 This week's theme from the LCV:
What is this, by the way? I think you might have done it last year, too?
The Landau Core Vocabulary.

And yes, you remembered right! I started supplying it to the Lexember participants in 2019.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 67,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

qwed117 wrote: 21 Dec 2020 00:12 Weekly Wrap Up
Like the past weeks, I'm just gonna give some appreciative comments to everyone who participated in Week 3 (by order of first participation in the week).

Iyionaku:
Spoiler:
Iyionaku wrote: 14 Dec 2020 06:59 Lexember 12th - Yélian

vástia [ˈvastɪ̯ɐ] - wilderness
Etymology: From vast "wild" + location suffix -ia
Edit: I just realized that in my dictionary on my work laptop the word didn't exist, but in my dictionary on my home PC there was already a word
for wilderness, vastesme. Well, synonyms are great, aren't they?
I really like this word, especially given its similarity to the phrase "vast wilderness". And it's always nice to have synonyms, especially this one which isn't too wild, given say English 'the wilds' vs 'the wilderness'.
As far as I know, this is a false cognate. The first word I remember from this stem was vastag "outside", so it seems that the obvious resemblance to English vast seems to be random.

Lexember 21st - Yélian

brigita (can teʻat) [bɾɨˈxiːta] - to come out (as gay, bisexual etc.)
Etymology: brigita "to explain"; literally "explain it to someone"

brigital [bɾɨˈxiːtɐl] - coming-out
Etymology: brigita "to explain" + nominalization suffix -l

Vat yibut peviyliratslota can méva o'Tom nat yipèrsbrigitet can tan - can oyaukó yaidéselrosratanet.
[vɐt ˈɕiːbʉ‿ˌpeva̯iːˈliːɾɐt͡sˌloːta kɐn ˈmeːʋa ɔ̈ˈtom nɐt ɕɨpɛɾsbɾɨˈxiːtət kɐn tan, kɐn ˌoːʃaʊ̯ˈkoː ʃaɪ̯ˌdeːsˌelɾɔ̈sɾɐˈtaːnət]
DEM PST-COP.3SG.INAN relief-big for mother DEF.GEN=PROP when PST-finally-come_out-3SG for 3SG.FEM.OBL - for knowledge-COL PST-PERF-long_time-suspect-3SG
It was a big relief for Tom's mother when he finally came out to her - of course, she had assumed it for a long time.

Bonus word :esp:

explicar [ekspliˈkar] - to explain
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Shemtov »

Day 19:
Maillys: "Afén" "Sacred Stone"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Huēoñ "Cornerstone"

Day 20:
Maillys: "Póĺśybho" "Demon"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Polihezpō "Demonic Madness"

Day 21:
Maillys: "Llyrr" "Lower Deity"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Tlitl "Lower Deity"
Last edited by Shemtov on 27 Dec 2020 19:38, edited 2 times in total.
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

qwed117 wrote: 21 Dec 2020 00:12 Jackk:
Spoiler:
Jackk wrote: 19 Dec 2020 01:13 18m Decembr
in translation from the 1981 scitation paper for the Dijon New School’s Domain History [1] course L'Art Militaire ès Guerres Romantiques (Strategy in the Romantic Wars). The course covers the 1640s to ‘60s, the most active portion of the various conflicts all grouped together under the label “Romantic Wars”.
iii) To what extent was Morrack [Morocco] able to exploit the death of Emperor Cariwasari [7] to increase silver exports to the Vetomund [Eurasia] and finance their ongoing wars with Vascony and Libya?
...
[7] Ruler of the Inca and vassal peoples from 1599 until his (suspected) assassination in 1660, the longest-reigning monarch in Cappatian [South American] history.
I said last week that it's interesting seeing the Boralverse snippets, but I think this aspect of Boralverse is really cool; that it appears that there were less Eurocentric relations between the New World and Old World. Kinda interested to find out what precisely happens in Sahul and in the Americas. Even the date of the American-Old World Interchange must be very different in Boralverse.
I can't express enough appreciation for these weekly wrap-ups! [<3] The New World is part of Boralverse I really ought to look more at, but of course it takes a lot of research, haha.
21r Decembr
excerpted from the Borlish translation of British heroic romance Y Ðreic o Redrωth (The Dragon of Redrouth), written in 2005 by Thoffina ver Girmont. It is loosely based on the old Arthurian tales first codified in eleventh-century Drengot England (and reworked substantially in post-Imperia Wales), but owes more to the popular imagining of these tales in Pacific literary works.
Redrouth se pen de mençon. Jainç forcer nastiscn cos fondaminal de parol intoccabr.
Redrouth is all about lying. Power-plays are built upon the foundations of intangible words.

Parol accaç gent vers abat, a parol poun abat stoppar, test laçar, cour rompr.
Words send men to war, and words can stop a war, can turn a head, can break a heart.

Ny conjuraçon parfait de parol assey forç, e l'un ant capabiltað total sur parol luïsc aðombracer dy Cort a Redrouth.
Power lies in the perfect manipulation of the words, and the one whose mastery of words is complete dominates the Court at Redrouth.

L'oc maistr n'es Rey Jundreth, ni alcun dell'ambasctour zucarrað, ni baron a largeç de collocq.
The master is not King Junderth, nor any of the silver-tongued diplomats, or verbose barons.

L'es y Prinç Heriter Arthur, duellist e tarnaç, degnant alcun hom saif : l'oc es sy grandessem victoir jusc oy.
It is the duellist taverner Crown Prince Arthur, though nobody knows it: this is his greatest triumph to date.

Pu sou ciel all'acr d'addoçment, glay ne man, toð sy tact e commission exact de parol son inutr.
But on the training field, a sword in his hand, all his diplomacies and precise choices of words are useless.

Avant y caller, i poð moment brey e briglant y sona de Prinç souvr.
Before the knights, he can for brief and shining moments lay down the mask of Prince.
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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