CBB Conlang Relay XII - FINISHED!!

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Iyionaku
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Iyionaku »

The second ring sounds completely like one of these rather mundane stories that were passed down for so many generations without ever being written, that it's completely epic in the end.

A spinning crowd on the dance floor? Hmm... what about Barbarians? No no, a single ruffian it is. Y'know what, let's just drop them entirely.
Your sister you say? What about... your master?
What about the dancefloor? Doesn't it sound more dramatic if you capture the emeralds sapphires from the... 4th corner of a worm?
And lastly, you should drop the moon and the sun. A gem of dark ice and a firefly does the job way better.

With my own torch, I am pretty much satisfied. I was pretty sure I had fucked up with shimo's torch entirely, especially after I got to know his torch was 20 words shorter than mine! Turns out we counted different things, and our English torch is almost identical. The sense of the text, however, was pretty much identical. The only sentence I did fuck up entirely is, ironically, the last one, where I was 100% sure I translated it correctly! It didn't matter in the long run though, as Parlox decided to drop this sentence completely. [:D] I separated this sentence from the rest of the text with a paragraph in my torch, what might have caused this issue.
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.

Salmoneus
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Salmoneus »

Maybe next time we need to get a bit more on the same page with the concept? I thought we were just translating the text, but some participants appear to have thought that we were each writing our own new texts loosely based on the same narrative - so in many cases you can't follow particular expressions as they evolve through the text, because they're just dropped or added to willy-nilly.


For instance, and not to pick on them, but Cedh's story, while evocative, is clearly in no way a 'translation' of the text he was given. It appears, for example, that he took a clause that he translated as "they left", and replaced it with a clause that he translated as "the people continued to dance and sing in their ritual, walking away towards the sacred megalith". That's not a translation, that's a new story!

Likewise, "it was easy to steal a full pile of things" becomes "I easily managed to find the amulet among the magical herbs and other strange things". And "I needed to go to the party" becomes "I needed to take my chance right now while everyone else was away at the celebrations for the spring equinox".

I mean, I know that some words will have to be changed to fit the cultural demands the language has to meet - I get "aristocrat" becoming "shaman", for instance. But I can't believe that any real language lacks a word or phrase for "to leave" that doesn't literally translate to "to continue to dance and sing in one's ritual as one walks away toward the sacred megalith". That's not "a small amount of semantic elaboration to make it make sense"! No wonder this one stage increased the text by 50%!

If you were called to the stand in court and asked to translate "they left" into Ronc Tyu, would you really under oath give that translation?

Surely the point of the exercise is to see how wildly the text can change accidentally, through translation, rather than how much we can intentionally embellish or alter the story?

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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Jackk »

MOONRISE

Time for out second phrase! I imagine not much can outdo
  • slip away > Who can see how little time I have left? / often
but we shall see...

The starting text has, simply, "moonrise". Unsurprisingly, many languages don't use a simgle word for this (indeed, the Boral is ort luner "lunar rise" so we quickly e x p a n d:
RING 1
> the moon's rising > the rising moon > the moon rose
RING 2
> the rising of the moon > the rise of the moon > the rising moon

Then suddenly, simultaneously [O.O] we see "rise" translated as "move into the sky":
RING 1
> the moon ... rose in the sky > the bright moon rose up to the sky > the glowing moon moved up in the sky > the glowing moon rose into the sky
RING 2
> the moon which went into the sky
Here we really begin to diverge. Ring 2 has now passed through a verbless language [:O] so we now get
> the big moon and the sky > the large moon and the sky > the enlarged moon of the sky > the giant sky making me overlook it [the moon]

Meanwhile, Ring 1 continues doing its thing:
the moon shining in the sky rose > the moon rose shining in the sky

Then finally the verb shifts meaning and we finish with
> the moon joins in the shining > the moon is shining also
Ring 2 really goes for it now, with three consecutive big-brain manœuvres:
the cramped-feeling sky felt like a dark time > the vapour that’s like a dim icy colour that pressurises itself is an event > vapour with a colour like dark ice which is condensing

Thus we arrive at
> smoky; it looks like black ice slowly freezing
The end result:
moonrise > the moon is shining also / smoky; it looks like black ice slowly freezing

I must say, I adore the aesthetic of Ring 2's result here [:D] (shhh never mind that I translated it to English at the end there [B)] )

Tune in next time for more Relay ShenanganryTM!
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Frislander »

spanick wrote:
11 Sep 2020 02:38
One that I find funny about Ring 1 is sister to cousin. It seems innocuous, but the word for “cousin” I got from Frislander was specifically male cousin and I then in turn used the term for older brother/older male parallel cousin. The original “sister” switched genders and relations but could very easily have ended up switching to “brother” in the very last round!
That's a particular vocabulary choice on my part, there isn't a generic "cousin" root in Asta so being the man that I am I defaulted to male because I had no gender information to go on in the text I got.

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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by DesEsseintes »

Salmoneus wrote:
11 Sep 2020 13:06
Maybe next time we need to get a bit more on the same page with the concept?

[...]

Surely the point of the exercise is to see how wildly the text can change accidentally, through translation, rather than how much we can intentionally embellish or alter the story?
I agree.

Perhaps there should be more clarity on this issue before the next relay. I certainly also believed that the purpose of the game was to stay as faithful to the text as possible.

At the end of the day, it’s only a game, and I don’t think it’s the end of the world, but I also do think games are more enjoyable when you feel you are playing with the same set of rules as everyone else.

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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Jackk »

Linguifex wrote:
11 Sep 2020 01:45
littlesalmon wrote:and then the king's heap
Linguifex wrote:which exist for the sake of a cohesive timeline
How did I screw that up that badly?
Let's have a look at the context of that phrase shall we? [}:D]
THE BARON'S VAULT

Probably I should be entirely unsurprised that such a culturally-loaded term as "baron" would go on a fun journey. [:D] The Boral was y tesoir dy baron, where tesoir means "bank, (bank) vault, treasury"

RING 1

the baron's vault > the jarl's [jarl! exciting!] treasure-chamber > the nobleman’s treasure chest

RING 2
the baron's vault > the bank of the baron > the lord’s vault > the chest of the lord > the treasure chest of the King [ooh we've gone up in the world!]

Here Ring 1 seems to lose the nobleman entirely [:O] but they come right back, so presumably it remained in the conlang. Nonetheless cultural fun happens and we find religion:
> the chest of valuables > the aristocrat's box > the box of the priest > the priest's box > his shaman box > the shaman’s box
Meanwhile Ring 2 keeps on with the king, for a moment giving the tresure to the narrator!
> my royal treasure > the king's treasure hoard > the monarch's hoard > the king's heap

Now Ring 1 has my favourite shift of all, a fun spatial mix-up:
> a priestess in the box
But this was clearly too unexpected and beautiful to survive:
> set it itself [an amulet] > only [herbs] in exchange
Now! we get onto the magnificent
> for the sake of a cohesive timeline
(Extremely curious to know the gloss of the intermediate lang here[:D])
This quite reasonably becomes
> for the sake of everyone there for days > for the benefit of everyone there on those days
which I somehow fashioned into
> modern [tools] ... so that everyone ...
Final result:
  • the baron's vault > only [herbs] in exchange / modern [tools] ... so that everyone ...
I can't tell which of these is more divergent! [B)]
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by spanick »

Frislander wrote:
11 Sep 2020 14:13
That's a particular vocabulary choice on my part, there isn't a generic "cousin" root in Asta so being the man that I am I defaulted to male because I had no gender information to go on in the text I got.
I figured that how we got from cousin to male cousin. I imagine that the last language to use “sister” may also use that term for “(female) cousin” which got put into a language which doesn’t specify the gender of cousins.
Baron also underwent a transformation from male to female. That’s a story I’d like to know.

I gotta say, I’m overall pretty pleased with how close my translation is to yours. My English translation is choppy and doesn’t flow well, but the main concepts are there. I totally misunderstood the coordinating conjunctions in Asta, which led to some very unnatural phrases.

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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Salmoneus »

Anyway, a couple of things spring out at me from the pre-Cedh texts that were partly my fault, so I'll explain a few...


The tense

I was aware the original was in the present tense, but there's just no way that an Old Wenthish narrative could be written in the present tense. This also helped me avoid some awkward tense questions where the original (as I translated it, which seems to have been accurate) felt of dubious grammaticality ("In that time, I have to find the emeralds, rejoin carrying everything I could steal..." etc - 'that time' and 'I have to' seem to clash, 'could' doesn't feel possible for me there because of the surrounding present tense (I'd have to say "can" or "am able to", or if I really needed the subjunctive I'd have to say "would be able to" or "might be able to" or something) etc), and I'd have had to make difficult decisions about how to preserve the original tense implications while ensuring grammaticality in the Old Wenthish. Putting it all into a nice, ordinary past tense made this all a lot easier while also, as I say, making it much more plausible as an Old Wenthish narrative.

The mass

The OW text is actually a bit tricky here, because it uses a verb-derived form (which in my torch I called a verbal noun, although I'm actually now calling them gerunds instead) - so literally "a crowding about s.o.". Click went for "mass" - I'm not sure if they thought that's what I meant (not realise I meant people), or if that's just how his conlang expresses crowds (after all, it can be that in English too). In any case, although the mass survived Cedh, ixals turned it back to "crowd" anyway, perhaps because Cedh had by then made it clearer that people were intended.

Leaving the path

The original apparently was "step out into the back street" - I'm not sure how I could have guessed "step into", because the Boral seems just to say "go out into". However, I evidentally did misunderstand the sense somewhat beyond that - "step out into" suggests the narrator is leaving a building, whereas I took from it just "leave into" or "exited into", and I assumed the sense was that she was already in one street and was turning into a side street.

In hindsight, I should have realised that the swirling crowd (apparently I should have said "revolving" crowd, but that seems an odd idea to me!) were the same people as the party, and hence must be indoors. But I didn't - I for some reason assumed she was already outside the house, but in a crowded street. I guess this also made more sense to me because I assumed the jarl's mathomchamber was in the building - if it isn't, why would she have to go back to the party just to escape from it? - and hence she wouldn't just have stepped out into the street.

ANYWAY... if I'd realised she was just leaving the house, I'd probably have gone with something that translated as "entered the alley". Instead, I went with the sense of turning from the street into the alley. And that's where I appear to have thrown click. See, the word I used for 'turn' (cognate to hypothetical English "forwend") means to leave a path... and the word for "alley" is literally 'little path' (hyp.Eng. 'pathock') - small unpaved road or street. Click reasonably translated that as 'footpath', but I think the combination of 'leave a path' and 'footpath' made them think she was leaving the footpath - rather than leaving ONTO the footpath. Case may also be an issue here - "in pathocạ frauáddo" requires that the translator notice that 'path' is accusative, not dative, and thus it means 'into the alley', not 'in the alley'.

This then became the slightly more emphatic 'turn to get away from the footpath' in brblues' translation, before Cedh thought better of the whole incident and replaced it with the more evocative "The people continued to dance and sing in their ritual, walking away towards the sacred megalith."

The Red Dot Far Away, Moving

I was meant to guess here that the Boral word for 'red' actually meant 'pink' in this context; but I failed.

More to the point, I had to do a bit of work with the phase "lost all trace of red/pink". I decided "lose" in this sense, particularly with an inanimate agent, and I instead reorganised the alignment and went with "all trace of red had gone". "All trace of red", however, I felt was also too idiomatic, so I went with the more literal "last red speck" (úteró... fleacca flannó). However, this caused two problems. Firstly, the word for "last" is the same as "later" (there is no regular superlative, the comparative is used instead), and the word for "later" is the same as "farther" or "outer". This is of course reflected in English too, but with a later random split - 'outer' vs 'utter'. Secondly, the wordfor 'speck' is more ordinarily 'mark', 'stain', 'fleck' or 'spot'. It can mean any discolouration or small but visible dot of colour.

Anyway, this expression literally means "the farther(most) red fleck", intended to be taken in a sense like "the final visible speck of red", but Click has not unreasonably gone with the more literal "the farther-away red spot".

This then seems to have become "a red speck... from far away" (the adjective getting mislaid), which cedh translated nicely as "a red dot somewhere far away". But Cedh then took a gamble and replaced this with "the sun... like a red gemstone". [I don't know whether 'dot' translates regularly as 'gemstone' in Ronc Tyu, or if that's an embellishment].

Meanwhile, because I changed 'had lost all red' to 'all red had gone', we developed some motion. The word I used translates to 'leave (not to return), disappear (from), die, be extinguished', but Click understandably went with a more literal "move away from". This then went back to 'disappear from', then 'descend', then 'hurry', and so on.

[Cedh momentarily had the more intriguing "I disappeared as a red dot", but evidently thought better of this fanciful notion and replaced themselves with the sun...]

So "lost all trace of red" becomes "the sun rises into the sky like a gem"

The cloudless clouds

This all wasn't helped by what I had to do in the rest of that clause. The original has a nice, simple, "the cloudless sky" (which loses the red). Unfortunately, Old Wenthish has a problem: there is no word for "sky" per se; instead, the plural "clouds" is used. This equation is sadly natural for those of us living on Atlantic islands - the poetic English wod for the sky, "welkin", literally just means "clouds", while its replacement, "sky", is just the borrowed Norse word for "cloud". (OW did have the equivalent to English "heaven", as well - but, as in English, this tended to be used in theological or metaphysical contexts, rather than meteorological observations; it would have been possible to translate directly as "cloudless heaven", but that would probably be interpreted as paraside, or, for the really educated, the void between the celestial spheres, rather than just 'the blue stuff you see looking up).

I didn't want to have to say "the cloudless clouds", so I went with what I think OW would have used in practice: the blue clouds. Unfortunately, the word for "blue" is also the word for "green", so I literally translated "the cloudless sky" as "the green clouds". Fortunately, Click realised this and stuck with 'blue'. However, this introduces clouds into what should be a cloudless story.

I don't understand really what happens to them. They gain a collective noun, becoming a herd of clouds (nice!), before Cedh claims to have eradicated them entirely, translating them as simply "the sky". And yet ixals, after Cedh, is talking about a herd of clouds again, so unless that's a massive coincidence, I don't think Cedh's story itself is a direct translation of the Ronc Tyu text!

The herd, in any case, is thinned down to one cloud, before finally expanding back to the clouds.

As for the colour, the blue clouds were obviously a bit confusing, and so they became clouds that simply turned blue.

[this could have ended up worse. The OW phrase literally, in order, goes: "outer then fleck red green clouds before departed". Fortunately, Click observed the case agreements (or common sense) and did not think that the farther dot had left the red-green (or red-blue) coulds...]


-------------

Put these together and "the cloudless sky has lost the last residue of red" becomes "the sun rises into the sky like a gem thrown through the clouds", and the entire narrative is now set at dawn rather than dusk...


I'll talk about a few other bits later...

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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by spanick »

After rereading the final English translation, I see that Jackk did actually end up using “brother” instead of cousin.

sister > (female?) cousin > cousin > male cousin > older male cousin/older brother > brother

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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Jackk »

SCATTER ... ONTO THE DANCEFLOOR
The Boral for this phrase is scadrir sull'area fruy "to scatter on the dancefloor", with the object (his valuables) preceding the verb. Early development is rather sensible:
Ring 1
scatter ... onto the dancefloor > strew ... onto the floor of the dance area > got strewn all over the dance hall’s floor [avoiding responsibility there! [xD]] > has been scattered over the dance room floor > got scattered all over the dancefloor
Ring 2
scatter ... onto the dancefloor > scatter ... on the dance floor > scatter ... at the dance floor > distributed on the dance floor

Now Ring 1 loses the dance—very sad. But then suddenly we start rending the earth in twain, hooray!
> scattered on the floor > splitting the earth > split open the ground > the ground broke > broke the earth > shatters the world

And we finish Ring 1 as a single adverb. [:D]
> earthshatteringly-[loud]
Meanwhile, Ring 2 decides a dancefloor is no place for a king (and that the floor is square, I assume):
> rush towards the four corners of the royal stage > comes quickly to the 4 corners of the stage > come quickly towards the four corners of the stage > the 4 corners shall swiftly be entered by it [we must reverse the polarity lol]

Having lost much of the semantic content, the syntax is free is slip further:
> shall swiftly come to be in four sides > will be inside the fourth part > Its four segments

And thus we end with something a firefly really ought not to be doing:
> It separated into four ... parts
Final Result
  • scatter ... onto the dancefloor > earthshatteringly-[loud] / It separated into four ... parts
One general phenomenon I have noticed is that the texts appear to diverge slowly at first, and accelerate rapidly apart. It reminds me of choas theory, where minute differences in initial conditions cause exponential differences later on. [:D]
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Salmoneus »

While that may partly be random luck of where certain languages or translators are in the chain, I think a lot of it is probably what you mention there about losing the semantic thread.

I would hypothesise that mistranslations go through a cycle:

coherent > incoherent > coherent

Or more accurately:

fraying > patching > reworking > fraying

In phase 1, the text is more or less coherent. Translators feel confident in translating fairly directly. However, over time oddities build up, until the coherence of the text is threatened. During this phase, the sense remains largely intact, although many seeds of future shifts are sown. I've called this "fraying": the text gradually comes apart.

In phase 2, the text is problematic. The translator may still be able to make some sense out of it, but there are things they don't 'get' - nonetheless, they try to translate them as accurately as they can, even though this means the incoherence is maintained, or even added to. However, because they don't understand certain elements, they're no longer translating directly, meaning-for-meaning, but are having to actively try to make sense of what they've been given. During this phase, the core sense largely remains, but the drift becomes quicker, and in particular subunits start to move around, syntactically and semantically, as the translators have, as it were, little jigsaw pieces that individually they can translate, but they're not 100% sure how they're meant to fit together. I've called this "patching": the text has fallen into pieces, but the translators diligently try to keep the pieces stuck together somehow.

In phase 3, the text is unworkable. Something, the translator thinks, has clearly gone wrong here, and if they're going to deliver something that actually makes sense they're going to have to take control of the issue: they start making more guesses, they gamble on what they think it means and rephrase awkward phrasings with simpler expressions that they hope are accurate. At this point, big drifts can take place, if they guess wrong. I've called this "reworking": rather than diligently copying, the translator has felt the need to translate more loosely in order to keep things making sense.

In phase 4, the reworking has produced a coherent text again. However, we are back where we started and it begins to fray again.

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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Jackk »

Salmoneus wrote:
11 Sep 2020 16:44
I would hypothesise that mistranslations go through a cycle:

coherent > incoherent > coherent

Or more accurately:

fraying > patching > reworking > fraying
...
That sounds very plausible [:D] 3 > 4 certainly describes my experience of translating the rings into English right at the end.
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Salmoneus »

Returning to Moonrise


So, R1 manages to turn the moon not having risen yet into the moon rising. How is this? Well, this is my fault again, at least partly.


The Boral translates (I thought!) to "it is only half an hour until moonrise" (though apparently the 'only' wasn't to be translated?) This is a weird sentence! What is "it"? What does "is" mean? and what does "until" really mean? (note that 'until' doesn't mean what it usually means). This sentence looks a lot like the sentence "it is angry until it is fed", but semantically it's almost unrelated! In the latter, there is anger present every moment until the feeding, but in our sentence there isn't a half hour present every moment until the rising!

I didn't feel I could use this English idiom in Old Wenthish.

Instead, to convey the sense of time remaining, I used an expression of lacking: it lacks only half an hour before moonrise. To do this, I used a prepositional expression that frustratingly doesn't exist in English, but does exist in Irish: "to be from", meaning to be lacking or to be wanting. "A cat is from him" = "he lacks (needs, wants) a cat".

However, OW doesn't need the dummy pronoun. And rather than the copula, it prefers a dummy positional noun. "It is half an hour to moonrise" = "half an hour lies from moonrise".

The big problem, however, arises from the Boral word "for" - only, just, except. I translated this as English 'only', but Old Wenthish doesn't have a word for 'only', at least in this context.

Instead, like older English, it uses the circumlocution, "nothing but". "only the rain" = "nothing but the rain". And 'but' is still at this stage "bi út" (by out - more idiomatically 'outside of').

Meanwhile, the pronoun "fram" (from) unfortunately also means "apart from, without" (see = lacking, wanting, above). However, it only means this in the more literal, prepositional sense - "a cat without a tail", "a man apart from his wife", etc - not in the more conjunctional sense of "other than" or "only".

Thus, we get the OW:

áid náinna lag fram rísn éscas bi út ta halbo úaro
lit.
and nothing lay from (the) rising of (the) moon but (/outside) (a) half hour.

Click has reasonably, but wrongly, translated this as:
and for half an hour there was nothing outside but the rising moon.

So, he's correctly gotten from 'and nothing lay' to 'there was nothing', and he's correctly expecting a 'but'. But he takes 'fram' as supplying the 'but', whereas it actually supplies the (temporal) location: so 'but the rising moon'. (the OW is actually 'the moon's rise'; don't know if this is a mistake on Click's part, or just the way his conlang says it, since "the rise of the moon" and "the rising moon" are semantically (if not syntactically!) equivalent in this sentence). That's left him with "bi út ta halbo úaro"; he's literally translated the first two words as "outside", but taken "ta halbo úaro" as meaning "for half an hour"; in fact, 'ta', just links 'bi út' to the half hour (technically, it turns the adverbial 'bi út', outside, into the prepositional 'bi út ta', outside of, = other than).


To be fair, though, this is kind of a difficult bit of syntax to work out, and I hadn't actually noticed at the time that 'fram' could lead a translator astray in this context, sorry.


Anyway, after this point, we've gone from the moon not rising yet, to the moon rising. Indeed, Cedh briefly toyed with "only the moon outside rose" (rather than the inside moon, I assume), before replacing this with "the moon climbed up brightly" (in the sky), dropping the 'only' and 'outside' entirely, and replacing them with 'brightly' (which later becomes 'shining').





---------------


I'd like to say, by the way, that Click did a reasonably good job, overall. The OW syntax is sometimes counterintuitive, and I gave him rather a lot of grammar to have to read through, so I'm glad the result ended up so close to the original!

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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by DzêtaRedfang »

I actually want to return to the "In Disguise" briefly. I don't think it most accurate to say it became merely "often" or that the Atruozan stage was merely "several times every now and then". Rather it should be "(I) have seen something several times every now and then".

From this it goes:
(I) have seen something several times every now and then > (I) often did not find anything > often (I) don't catch anything

Not as fun as it just collapsing into often I suppose, but it's still a very fun result nonetheless at the end, especially to look at how the verb shifted twice in the last two stages. [:D]

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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by ixals »

I have to agree on what Sal has said. Cedh's translation helped changing the original text a lot but in the end this is a translation game and not a writing class.
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Iyionaku »

What does google translate think your language is?
Challenge for Ring 2 (as I was in there):

Jackk: Corse
shimobaatar: Hausa
Iyionaku: Haitian
Parlox: Galician
sasasha: Haitian
Yrusia: Frisian
kiwikami: Igbo
Reyzandren: Hausa
littlesalmon: Samoan
Linguifex: Hungarian
DzêtaRedfang: Vietnamese

Final text of Google Translate relay 2:

When I was able to escape by returning, I lost all my reflexes and flew into the blue water. The first star to shine in the sky; Half an hour a month.
When I was there, I brought the tools, gave it to my brother, went to a party together, grew up taking anything to the store, threw magic spells at him, and dancing, I went inside. Night
My sister has to do these signs.
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.

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Linguifex
roman
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Linguifex »

In defense of cedh here, Ronc Tyu is a bit constrained by its nature of having come from an Akana conlang relay, so certain lexical/grammatical quirks or gaps and certain cultural constraints are baked into the language. I feel some latitude should be allowed for translation by sense/culture.
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Index Diachronica PDF v.10.0
Conworld megathread

AVDIO · VIDEO · DISCO

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Frislander
mayan
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Location: The North

Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by Frislander »

Google Translate for Ring 1

Sal: Irish (obvs)
Click: Hungarian
brblues: Igbo
Cedh: Vietnamese
ixals: Somali
loglorn: Sesotho
DesEsseintes: Irish (again)
anonymous123: Lithuanian
Frislander: Azeri
spanick: Gujarati.

Also prize to Cedh for "text Google Translate can get the most out of" with the following result:
Spoiler:
Se twín nyu hic to. Ne ndza is entirely pei uźec vei gyoun. How to fix pyec to faen faen binc, o dzó zuc zuc kracan. Ne brinc sruo.

I signed up for the job, and continued to work. Myou loot pyonc trae. The country is usually in production, in the middle of the day, and in the short term.

If so, stir fried pya ndzu śou-mó. It is very important to have a micrometer to make it easier. If mbrinc dàon htsí htsí, htlanc na twin no binc yu zrou-mbì binc yu zrou-mbì. If you do not have a problem, you will be at risk first. If the hair is tied up, the hair will be very tight. Embankment yéi hihfyáon hunggòun wo ne, o wo diec wie fae lo ngwin, o wo na ndao gló wie fae hfyao hfyao lin kwé, o wo ki méc dyo htroa dyo, drenc ne ráon tswi blo śea ne téc śenc gibyonc.

Ndźei has a large cocoon, it is a huge massacre, I have a lot of apples in nwa nwa.

DzêtaRedfang
hieroglyphic
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by DzêtaRedfang »

How the heck did GT take Atruozan to be Vietnamese [xD] [xD] [xD]

Atruozan is far to the other side of the synthetic spectrum to the isolating Vietnamese lmao.

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loglorn
mayan
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Re: CBB Conlang Relay XII - ONGOING (signups remain open)

Post by loglorn »

Unfathomable amounts of cursed diacritics can only mean one thing.
Diachronic Conlanging is the path to happiness, given time. [;)]

Gigxkpoyan Languages: CHÍFJAEŚÍ RETLA TLAPTHUV DÄLDLEN CJUŚËKNJU ṢATT

Other langs: Søsøzatli Kamëzet

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