Search found 2417 matches

by Salmoneus
16 Sep 2021 22:50
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 749
Views: 98000

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So, I want to make a conlang inspired by languages I like, but what do you do if the languages you like are all very different from each other? It's obvious: you continually agonise and keep going back and redoing everything because the two things you want to emulate can't be combined; one day you ...
by Salmoneus
16 Sep 2021 22:45
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: CBB Conlang Relay XIV - IT BEGINS (late signups accepted)
Replies: 42
Views: 1263

Re: CBB Conlang Relay XIV - IT BEGINS (late signups accepted)

Huh. Last time was my first one of these, and I was 'lucky', in ending up at the beginning of one ring - so I got the original, coherent text... easy enough... ...and this time I've ended up at the end of the ring, so I'll get the final, least-coherent version of the text. I have a feeling this one ...
by Salmoneus
15 Sep 2021 02:59
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: What are the differences between lexis, lexicon, vocabulary?
Replies: 2
Views: 144

Re: What are the differences between lexis, lexicon, vocabulary?

I'd say a difference is that lexis isn't really a list of words - it's a way of analysing a language, or it's one of the faculties of language. Lexis is the part of language that's about knowing and choosing and using words (as opposed to morphology, how words are productively related to one another...
by Salmoneus
13 Sep 2021 23:37
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 545
Views: 71039

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Very specific, but is there any reason why the Irish -ach suffix has a voiced fricative in some declined forms (-aigh) instead of the expected voiceless one? Is it just some weird irregularity or is there any reason behind it? I don't know. However, Old Irish had had a sound change, apparently, in ...
by Salmoneus
08 Sep 2021 22:45
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

What is the difference between immediate, direct, and eventual succession? Sorry! I was using 'immediate' and 'eventual' in contrast: immediate succession relating to A being the first successor of B, and eventual succession relating to A being a ruler at some point after B. I've used this is two d...
by Salmoneus
08 Sep 2021 17:35
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

OK, here are the English headline stats, from Alfred through to Anne (she seemed a good stopping point; not only do they stop being officially 'King of England' at that point, but they also become almost entirely constitutional monarchs): Mean Age at Accession: 27 Mean Age of "Natural" Dea...
by Salmoneus
08 Sep 2021 16:02
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

Incidentally, I'm looking at English monarchs now, and they may as well be in an entirely different universe...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 22:53
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

The weird thing about the Roman Empire is, ALL succession was non-institutionalized. There was never any organised way to select a new ruler, or any agreement so far as I can see as to what would constitute legitimacy per se. Or rather: the theoretical method of becoming Emperor, election by the Sen...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 16:41
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: CBB Conlang Relay XIV - IT BEGINS (late signups accepted)
Replies: 42
Views: 1263

Re: CBB Conlang Relay XIV - SIGNUPS OPEN UNTIL MON 13th SEP

OK, I guess. No progress on anything else, so I'm afraid it'll be Old Wenthish again (boring Germanic language).
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 15:35
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

Finally, I’m afraid I feel the need to run through the caveats pedantically. So here we go: First, the time period. I decided to end with Constantine IV, for three reasons: by the end of Constantine’s reign, it was clear that the Roman system had been destroyed, following catastrophic territorial lo...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 15:24
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

So, there we go. What does any of this mean? I don’t know. I think it will be interesting to compare these stats to those of other Empires, or those of mediaeval kingdoms (including Byzantium). For now, I’ll recap some headlines. I’ve introduced here another measure here that I hope may be useful: q...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 15:13
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

Anyway, we can clearly see a transition – albeit still incomplete – from an early practice of nomination of rulers, either by a preceding ruler or by some other authority, political or military, toward a later practice of just crowning a nearby pliable young relative of the last guy. This is associa...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 15:13
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

Overall, it’s clear that there was over time a transition in the nature of imperium. The process became more regular, with less need of ad hoc proclamations – only 14% of Christian Emperors, compared to 43% of Pagans. Irregular, non-BioS inheritance became more common (46%, up from 26%), but BioS in...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 15:12
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

Among the Christians, by contrast, the odds of a theoretically natural death soared to 67% (almost double!), while the odds of (obvious) murder plummeted to only 3%, an astonishing decline. The odds of death in battle against an enemy power, and of being overthrown by rebels, remained (exactly!) the...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 15:11
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

We must recognise, however, that the nature of imperium changed over these 712 years (I’ve given a few examples above). So we can run the numbers on a few subsets of time. First, if we subtract the Crisis of the Third Century – from the death of Severus Alexander to the accession of Diocletian – we ...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 15:10
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

As regards departures, half (35) died of natural causes. The remainder were mostly evenly split between those overthrown by armed rebellions (15), and those randomly murdered (15), with the balance, 5, being those who were defeated in battle by a foreign power (3 by the Persians, 2 by the Goths). Th...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 15:09
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Re: Roman Emperor Statistics

Across the 712 years in question, the average Emperor achieved a reign of 10 years – taking the throne at the age of 40, and surrendering it, one way or another, at the age of 50. Reigns varied greatly in length – from less than a year to over 40 (in the case of Theodosius II) – but they were very ...
by Salmoneus
07 Sep 2021 15:08
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Roman Emperor Statistics
Replies: 15
Views: 322

Roman Emperor Statistics

My latest half-hearted curiosity: wondering how long Roman Emperors tended to reign. Why? Well, general curiosity, I guess, but also with a conworlding interest: if you have a polity in some ways similar to the Roman Empire, how long should you allocate to the rule of each monarch? You can have a gu...
by Salmoneus
01 Sep 2021 00:15
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 749
Views: 98000

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

A question about verb tense/aspect for Osroene: Would it be plausible for a perfect form to be synthetic, while the preterite/simple past is newer and is composed of 2 parts (deriving from an earlier participle)? In more detail concerning intransitive verbs, the perfect is an "original" i...
by Salmoneus
29 Aug 2021 15:28
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 749
Views: 98000

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

OK. I am not a native speaker of English, and may have missed something. In my native language, German, we use zwischen for both 'between' and 'among'. We do in English, too, don't worry. Eldin is right that there's a prescriptivist distinction between the two words - it's grown up over time and is...