Search found 2269 matches

by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 23:36
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Solenja
Replies: 19
Views: 155

Re: Solenja

I'd just like to point out: take some of what Khemehekis says with a big pinch of salt, because he's talking about his own, American dialect. In particular: Americans usually have the same sound in "of" and "cut", but the rest of the world doesn't. For the rest of us (well, a lot of us, I don't know...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 19:59
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 396
Views: 165453

Re: English Orthography Reform

from, of, what, because; for some speakers also somebody, anybody, nobody Oh, thanks - I knew those (though I'd forgotten 'because'), but I assumed there were more. Wait, apparently also "was"? There might be others, but the spelling doesn't help - something that looks like it represents /ɒ/ could ...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 18:33
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 396
Views: 165453

Re: English Orthography Reform

Small mistake, though: you have the weak vowel merger in words like "Omerokon" (tangent: why mark schwa before /n/, but not before /l/?), but you don't have it in words like "disuyded" or "distiqgwish"... (should be either "disuyded" and "Omerikon" or "dosuyded" and "Omerokon"). this isn't necessar...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 18:28
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 396
Views: 165453

Re: English Orthography Reform

Yes, it's definitely unusual. <o> is literally the least intuitive vowel possible for that sound! [I also find <eu> for /u:/ to be really counterintuitive, because it's so associated in English with /j/... and speaking of which, using <j> for /j/ when you're not using <y> would be very odd for Engl...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 15:07
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 396
Views: 165453

Re: English Orthography Reform

Yes, it's definitely unusual. <o> is literally the least intuitive vowel possible for that sound! [I also find <eu> for /u:/ to be really counterintuitive, because it's so associated in English with /j/... and speaking of which, using <j> for /j/ when you're not using <y> would be very odd for Engli...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 14:54
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 539
Views: 45246

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I don't understand your question?
by Salmoneus
04 May 2021 13:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Languages with interesting phonotactics
Replies: 35
Views: 10900

Re: Languages with interesting phonotactics

Whisper the words "fat feet". If you can tell the two words apart, then no, voiceless vowels are not impossible.
by Salmoneus
03 May 2021 18:57
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 478
Views: 37299

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Has anyone made a new orthography for English, where, if you see a written word, its spelling always tells exactly how it's pronounced, and if you hear a word, its sounds always tell exactly how it's spelled? In other words, you don't have to memorize both spelling and pronunciation. If does have, ...
by Salmoneus
03 May 2021 00:10
Forum: Language Learning & Non-English
Topic: Last word you learned in a foreign language
Replies: 80
Views: 37319

Re: Last word you learned in a foreign language

I'm having another go at the Irish Duolingo course, after pretty much ignoring it for a year. Good news: my memory for obscure nouns is much better than I expected! Bad news: my memory for even common verbs is much worse than I expected... Anyway, a word I've re-learned: taitin - "to shine". It's no...
by Salmoneus
02 May 2021 20:16
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Danish vowel allophony
Replies: 8
Views: 347

Re: Danish vowel allophony

Well, on the one hand: yes, absolutely, the great majority of languages on Earth are highly endangered. To quote Wikipedia: "the general consensus is that there are between 6,000 and 7,000 languages currently spoken and that between 50% and 90% of them will have become extinct by the year 2100". An...
by Salmoneus
02 May 2021 15:30
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Magical Economics
Replies: 17
Views: 554

Re: Magical Economics

What can we say about necromancers? Well, a necromancer is basically the same as a union boss: she controls a certain amount of labour (that is, she uses her influence over a supply of labour to enforce collective bargaining agreements). So, all else being equal, having a necromancer around raises w...
by Salmoneus
02 May 2021 12:44
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 539
Views: 45246

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So, what does obviative do? It just says 'this NP is lower in the hierarchy' and semantic roles and information structure are coded by cases or word order or something else? That definition is wrong, obviation just marks that one third-person entity is less salient than another and is thus more bac...
by Salmoneus
02 May 2021 12:22
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 539
Views: 45246

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

- Proximate/obviate is a way to mark (4) - they say which non-participant is acting on which. So they're not really the same thing at all. You can have one without the other - D/I languages mostly aren't P/O, except in North America. However, it's not a coincidence that in North America languages a...
by Salmoneus
02 May 2021 00:31
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 539
Views: 45246

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

It would seem odd to have obviation so important as to need marking on the pronouns, yet not be necessary to mark on the nouns. It also means that you have to deduce the reference of the pronouns simply from context, despite it being important enough to have this entire grammatical system built arou...
by Salmoneus
29 Apr 2021 23:29
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Danish vowel allophony
Replies: 8
Views: 347

Re: Danish vowel allophony

I wonder how the dialects will diverge in the coming centuries. Some may develop an 8-way contrast in high vowels /i i: y y: ʉ ʉ: u u: ɪ ɪ: ʏ ʏ: ɵ ɵ: ʊ ʊ:/ from Norwegian/Swedish influence, while others may reduce it to the German system /ɪ i: ʏ y: ʊ u: ɛ e: ɛ: œ ø: ɔ o: a a:/. I'd say a bigger con...
by Salmoneus
29 Apr 2021 03:07
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Danish vowel allophony
Replies: 8
Views: 347

Re: Danish vowel allophony

I wonder how the dialects will diverge in the coming centuries. Some may develop an 8-way contrast in high vowels /i i: y y: ʉ ʉ: u u: ɪ ɪ: ʏ ʏ: ɵ ɵ: ʊ ʊ:/ from Norwegian/Swedish influence, while others may reduce it to the German system /ɪ i: ʏ y: ʊ u: ɛ e: ɛ: œ ø: ɔ o: a a:/. I'd say a bigger con...
by Salmoneus
28 Apr 2021 20:27
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 478
Views: 37299

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

As dormouse said, there isn't evidence to the contrary. But quite clearly there is, otherwise we wouldn't be having this discussion. Of course, by now, better evidence has been provided, showing (as I should have realised, of course) that all the prima facie evidence for the change is actually the ...
by Salmoneus
27 Apr 2021 22:54
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Overcorrecting
Replies: 6
Views: 225

Re: Overcorrecting

So basically Sal, you assume that if speakers of Z learned B, they would not overcorrect and incorrectly add back the distinction in verb forms or other places where the distinction could be "assumed" from a pattern. I'm just double checking if that's what you meant. Well, if speakers of Z learn B,...
by Salmoneus
27 Apr 2021 12:37
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Magical Economics
Replies: 17
Views: 554

Re: Magical Economics

But the answer to "would you have feudalism if you had magic?" is "yes, absolutely"... depending on what sort of magic you had. Specifically magic as a tradeable resource ala the DnD magical item marketplace. If you have trade networks that support being able to walk into a medium sized town to pur...
by Salmoneus
27 Apr 2021 12:27
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 478
Views: 37299

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Give examples of cases where Latin /kk/ becomes /s/. If the /ks/ examples are only reborrowings, it should be easy to find a horde of 'real' reflexes with /s/, or even doublets! I don't know about a horde (like Pabappa said, the phoneme distribution in Latin makes instances rare), but there are exa...