Search found 2276 matches

by Salmoneus
09 May 2021 19:04
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 552
Views: 46019

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

it would be so: a) Aḳālum uśśêkun âdī pariñtu sun-FEM arms-3fs many-MASC vanish-3fs the many-armed sun vanished / the sun with many arms vanished b) Uśśê Aḳālam âdī pariñti arm-CNS sun-FEM many-MASC vanish-3ms the many arms belonging to the sun vanished It is a difference over whether the possessor...
by Salmoneus
08 May 2021 00:37
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 400
Views: 165764

Re: English Orthography Reform

This is a good point – and one that at least I myself have probably never really considered. It does make a lot of sense, though; many of the irregularities occur in fairly common words, so they're relatively easy to memorize. Although I'm guessing they can still be a bit of an extra hassle for chi...
by Salmoneus
07 May 2021 16:42
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 552
Views: 46019

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I think it would be necessary to be more clear what is meant by 'person' here, and indeed 'human'...
by Salmoneus
07 May 2021 16:24
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: PPIE
Replies: 8
Views: 176

Re: PPIE

Very interesting. As for your assertion, in regards to their geographic proximity, I do believe there might be some genetic relationship between PIE and PNWC. Not my assertion! Just a common theory. NWC and PIE look quite similar, and would have been spoken in or around the same location. Either a ...
by Salmoneus
07 May 2021 12:44
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: PPIE
Replies: 8
Views: 176

Re: PPIE

To be frank, there's a lot of blurring between "PPIE" and "PIE". Most of the "PIE" you'll see is actually just LPIE - that is, Late Proto-Indo-European, rather than Proto-Indo-Hittite. I don't think we can really securely reconstruct PIH, so a lot of the PIE you'll see is basically LPIE, with some f...
by Salmoneus
06 May 2021 14:10
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Solenja
Replies: 23
Views: 322

Re: Solenja

Park Bom wrote: 05 May 2021 23:46 Thank you Salmoneus for your input / explanation. [:3]
English is just complicated...
Yes; at least, our vowels are.

Sorry for the hijacking: there's an old saying from another board - 'sooner or later, all threads if they last long enough become English pronunciation discussions'...
by Salmoneus
06 May 2021 14:04
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 400
Views: 165764

Re: English Orthography Reform

(minim rule?) <o> for <u> adjacent to <m n> as in "come", "tongue" etc. (which might not be entirely about minims) Oh right, that. Sorry, don't remember hearing that (or any!) term for it. Other irregular sound shifts that exist in some dialects: - /ɔ/ in 'God' Oh, I didn't know that! - /ɛ/ in 'can...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 23:36
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Solenja
Replies: 23
Views: 322

Re: Solenja

I'd just like to point out: take some of what Khemehekis says with a big pinch of salt, because he's talking about his own, American dialect. In particular: Americans usually have the same sound in "of" and "cut", but the rest of the world doesn't. For the rest of us (well, a lot of us, I don't know...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 19:59
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 400
Views: 165764

Re: English Orthography Reform

from, of, what, because; for some speakers also somebody, anybody, nobody Oh, thanks - I knew those (though I'd forgotten 'because'), but I assumed there were more. Wait, apparently also "was"? There might be others, but the spelling doesn't help - something that looks like it represents /ɒ/ could ...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 18:33
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 400
Views: 165764

Re: English Orthography Reform

Small mistake, though: you have the weak vowel merger in words like "Omerokon" (tangent: why mark schwa before /n/, but not before /l/?), but you don't have it in words like "disuyded" or "distiqgwish"... (should be either "disuyded" and "Omerikon" or "dosuyded" and "Omerokon"). this isn't necessar...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 18:28
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 400
Views: 165764

Re: English Orthography Reform

Yes, it's definitely unusual. <o> is literally the least intuitive vowel possible for that sound! [I also find <eu> for /u:/ to be really counterintuitive, because it's so associated in English with /j/... and speaking of which, using <j> for /j/ when you're not using <y> would be very odd for Engl...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 15:07
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 400
Views: 165764

Re: English Orthography Reform

Yes, it's definitely unusual. <o> is literally the least intuitive vowel possible for that sound! [I also find <eu> for /u:/ to be really counterintuitive, because it's so associated in English with /j/... and speaking of which, using <j> for /j/ when you're not using <y> would be very odd for Engli...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 14:54
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 552
Views: 46019

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I don't understand your question?
by Salmoneus
04 May 2021 13:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Languages with interesting phonotactics
Replies: 39
Views: 11060

Re: Languages with interesting phonotactics

Whisper the words "fat feet". If you can tell the two words apart, then no, voiceless vowels are not impossible.
by Salmoneus
03 May 2021 18:57
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 478
Views: 37693

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Has anyone made a new orthography for English, where, if you see a written word, its spelling always tells exactly how it's pronounced, and if you hear a word, its sounds always tell exactly how it's spelled? In other words, you don't have to memorize both spelling and pronunciation. If does have, ...
by Salmoneus
03 May 2021 00:10
Forum: Language Learning & Non-English
Topic: Last word you learned in a foreign language
Replies: 80
Views: 37418

Re: Last word you learned in a foreign language

I'm having another go at the Irish Duolingo course, after pretty much ignoring it for a year. Good news: my memory for obscure nouns is much better than I expected! Bad news: my memory for even common verbs is much worse than I expected... Anyway, a word I've re-learned: taitin - "to shine". It's no...
by Salmoneus
02 May 2021 20:16
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Danish vowel allophony
Replies: 8
Views: 392

Re: Danish vowel allophony

Well, on the one hand: yes, absolutely, the great majority of languages on Earth are highly endangered. To quote Wikipedia: "the general consensus is that there are between 6,000 and 7,000 languages currently spoken and that between 50% and 90% of them will have become extinct by the year 2100". An...
by Salmoneus
02 May 2021 15:30
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Magical Economics
Replies: 17
Views: 714

Re: Magical Economics

What can we say about necromancers? Well, a necromancer is basically the same as a union boss: she controls a certain amount of labour (that is, she uses her influence over a supply of labour to enforce collective bargaining agreements). So, all else being equal, having a necromancer around raises w...
by Salmoneus
02 May 2021 12:44
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 552
Views: 46019

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So, what does obviative do? It just says 'this NP is lower in the hierarchy' and semantic roles and information structure are coded by cases or word order or something else? That definition is wrong, obviation just marks that one third-person entity is less salient than another and is thus more bac...
by Salmoneus
02 May 2021 12:22
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 552
Views: 46019

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

- Proximate/obviate is a way to mark (4) - they say which non-participant is acting on which. So they're not really the same thing at all. You can have one without the other - D/I languages mostly aren't P/O, except in North America. However, it's not a coincidence that in North America languages a...