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by Salmoneus
15 May 2021 16:26
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 487
Views: 38775

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

FWIW, while I'm not an expert, my impression is that both verbs are also much less common in Old English than you might expect. Looking at Beowulf, there's a lot more use of "frame" and "work" instead - although of course poetry might use more ornate language than ordinary speech (translations of th...
by Salmoneus
14 May 2021 20:35
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 487
Views: 38775

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

ixals wrote: 14 May 2021 01:08 Do North Germanic languages not have cognates of make and do? Or am I just blind?
Sorry, I meant to quote this in my reply so it wouldn't get lost. For my answer, see above...
by Salmoneus
14 May 2021 15:48
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 487
Views: 38775

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

For the first, Orel connects Icelandic maka , 'to smear', and indirectly (through non-verb forms) Old Norse makr , 'more unsuitable' and maki , 'match, mate' (continued in Icelandic as 'spouse'). He gives a Slavic cognate also meaning 'to smear', and a Greek cognate meaning 'to knead'. Orel doesn't ...
by Salmoneus
14 May 2021 15:23
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: What are you listening to/watching?
Replies: 264
Views: 17168

Re: What are you listening to/watching?

I did the quiz thingy before checking what this is all about. I got Abnegation. But then I read that "Faction leaders want their members to think and act a certain way" and "The factions have conditioned their members to think and act a certain way" I immediately thought, nah. Too much like real li...
by Salmoneus
12 May 2021 20:19
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Yay or Nay?
Replies: 145
Views: 13545

Re: Yay or Nay?

The real answer, of course, is that you should use Germanic logograms...

...but unfortunately you'd have to restart the Germanic logogram project again to do so. And I'm guessing it's been pruned...
by Salmoneus
12 May 2021 17:25
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 569
Views: 47873

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

There's no answer to that, because "time travel" is not a well-defined concept. The two big questions would be: how widespread is time travel?; and what are the consequences of time travel on causality? [is this an eternal loop scenario, or a rewriting/many-worlds scenario? And if it's an eternal lo...
by Salmoneus
09 May 2021 19:04
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 569
Views: 47873

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

it would be so: a) Aḳālum uśśêkun âdī pariñtu sun-FEM arms-3fs many-MASC vanish-3fs the many-armed sun vanished / the sun with many arms vanished b) Uśśê Aḳālam âdī pariñti arm-CNS sun-FEM many-MASC vanish-3ms the many arms belonging to the sun vanished It is a difference over whether the possessor...
by Salmoneus
08 May 2021 00:37
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 402
Views: 166071

Re: English Orthography Reform

This is a good point – and one that at least I myself have probably never really considered. It does make a lot of sense, though; many of the irregularities occur in fairly common words, so they're relatively easy to memorize. Although I'm guessing they can still be a bit of an extra hassle for chi...
by Salmoneus
07 May 2021 16:42
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 569
Views: 47873

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I think it would be necessary to be more clear what is meant by 'person' here, and indeed 'human'...
by Salmoneus
07 May 2021 16:24
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: PPIE
Replies: 10
Views: 274

Re: PPIE

Very interesting. As for your assertion, in regards to their geographic proximity, I do believe there might be some genetic relationship between PIE and PNWC. Not my assertion! Just a common theory. NWC and PIE look quite similar, and would have been spoken in or around the same location. Either a ...
by Salmoneus
07 May 2021 12:44
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: PPIE
Replies: 10
Views: 274

Re: PPIE

To be frank, there's a lot of blurring between "PPIE" and "PIE". Most of the "PIE" you'll see is actually just LPIE - that is, Late Proto-Indo-European, rather than Proto-Indo-Hittite. I don't think we can really securely reconstruct PIH, so a lot of the PIE you'll see is basically LPIE, with some f...
by Salmoneus
06 May 2021 14:10
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Solenja
Replies: 30
Views: 546

Re: Solenja

Park Bom wrote: 05 May 2021 23:46 Thank you Salmoneus for your input / explanation. [:3]
English is just complicated...
Yes; at least, our vowels are.

Sorry for the hijacking: there's an old saying from another board - 'sooner or later, all threads if they last long enough become English pronunciation discussions'...
by Salmoneus
06 May 2021 14:04
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 402
Views: 166071

Re: English Orthography Reform

(minim rule?) <o> for <u> adjacent to <m n> as in "come", "tongue" etc. (which might not be entirely about minims) Oh right, that. Sorry, don't remember hearing that (or any!) term for it. Other irregular sound shifts that exist in some dialects: - /ɔ/ in 'God' Oh, I didn't know that! - /ɛ/ in 'can...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 23:36
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Solenja
Replies: 30
Views: 546

Re: Solenja

I'd just like to point out: take some of what Khemehekis says with a big pinch of salt, because he's talking about his own, American dialect. In particular: Americans usually have the same sound in "of" and "cut", but the rest of the world doesn't. For the rest of us (well, a lot of us, I don't know...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 19:59
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 402
Views: 166071

Re: English Orthography Reform

from, of, what, because; for some speakers also somebody, anybody, nobody Oh, thanks - I knew those (though I'd forgotten 'because'), but I assumed there were more. Wait, apparently also "was"? There might be others, but the spelling doesn't help - something that looks like it represents /ɒ/ could ...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 18:33
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 402
Views: 166071

Re: English Orthography Reform

Small mistake, though: you have the weak vowel merger in words like "Omerokon" (tangent: why mark schwa before /n/, but not before /l/?), but you don't have it in words like "disuyded" or "distiqgwish"... (should be either "disuyded" and "Omerikon" or "dosuyded" and "Omerokon"). this isn't necessar...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 18:28
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 402
Views: 166071

Re: English Orthography Reform

Yes, it's definitely unusual. <o> is literally the least intuitive vowel possible for that sound! [I also find <eu> for /u:/ to be really counterintuitive, because it's so associated in English with /j/... and speaking of which, using <j> for /j/ when you're not using <y> would be very odd for Engl...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 15:07
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: English Orthography Reform
Replies: 402
Views: 166071

Re: English Orthography Reform

Yes, it's definitely unusual. <o> is literally the least intuitive vowel possible for that sound! [I also find <eu> for /u:/ to be really counterintuitive, because it's so associated in English with /j/... and speaking of which, using <j> for /j/ when you're not using <y> would be very odd for Engli...
by Salmoneus
05 May 2021 14:54
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 569
Views: 47873

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I don't understand your question?
by Salmoneus
04 May 2021 13:01
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Languages with interesting phonotactics
Replies: 39
Views: 11171

Re: Languages with interesting phonotactics

Whisper the words "fat feet". If you can tell the two words apart, then no, voiceless vowels are not impossible.