Search found 1607 matches

by All4Ɇn
24 Feb 2021 17:10
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 792
Views: 209693

Re: False cognates

:eng: thou (formerly þou)
:eng: you

Given that thou was formerly written as þou and thus could also look like you (like þe/ye) it's easy to think that you was originally just a spelling pronunciation of þou when þ resembled y.
by All4Ɇn
23 Feb 2021 16:38
Forum: Games
Topic: Romanization game #2
Replies: 1076
Views: 72236

Re: Romanization game #2

/p b t d k g/ <p b t d k g> /s z ʃ ʒ h/ <s z ş j h> /t͡s d͡z t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/ <ţ dz ç c> /m n/ <m n> /l j w/ <l y ğ> /i y ɯ u/ <i ü ı u> /e ø ɤ o/ <ë ö e o> /a ɒ/ <ä a> Aa Ää Bb Cc Çç Dd Dzdz Ee Ëë Gg Ğğ Hh Iı İi Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Öö Pp Ss Şş Tt Ţţ Uu Üü Yy Zz Next: /m n ŋ/ /p b t tʰ d k ɡ/ /f v s z x ɣ/ /l...
by All4Ɇn
23 Feb 2021 14:38
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 436
Views: 23828

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Do Romanian cases come directly from Vulgar Latin or are adaptations from Slavic? The nominative/accusative and genitive/dative cases come directly from Vulgar Latin but their survival in modern Romanian is likely because of Slavic. The vocative case was partially inherited from Vulgar Latin in the...
by All4Ɇn
18 Feb 2021 16:13
Forum: Games
Topic: Romanization game #2
Replies: 1076
Views: 72236

Re: Romanization game #2

/p b t d k g/ <p b t d k g> /θ s ɬ ʃ x/ <z s ł x h> /t͡s t͡ɬ t͡ʃ/ <c cł ć> /m n ŋ/ <m n ń> /ɹ l j w/ <j l y w> /r/ <r> /i u/ <i u> /e ẽ o õ/ <e eḿ o oḿ> /a ã/ <a aḿ> Aa Bb Cc Ćć Dd Ee Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Łł Mm Ḿḿ Nn Ńń Oo Pp Rr Ss Tt Uu Ww Xx Yy Zz Next: /p pʰ t tʰ c cʰ k kʰ/ /tɕ tɕʰ/ /s sʰ/ /ɾ j w ɬ/...
by All4Ɇn
14 Feb 2021 01:29
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 436
Views: 23828

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

where do you live? could it be Basque? some Basque speakers in France have [y]. That would be a total shot in the dark, though, so I doubt that's what it is. When I hear an unknown language that sounds like a bunch of other languages, it usually ends up being Portuguese [xP] Unfortunately, "French-...
by All4Ɇn
14 Feb 2021 00:08
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 436
Views: 23828

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I recently heard two European looking men speaking a language and was very surprised that I couldn't even guess which one it was. The intonation sounded quite similar to French but at times I thought it could be German. I couldn't understand a word they were saying which is what made it particularly...
by All4Ɇn
13 Feb 2021 06:25
Forum: Games
Topic: Romanization game #2
Replies: 1076
Views: 72236

Re: Romanization game #2

/m n ɲ ŋ ɴ/ <m n ñ ng nq> /p t t͡s t͡ɬ t͡ʃ k q ʔ/ <p t c ch č k q q̌ /b d d͡z d͡ɮ d͡ʒ g ɢ/ <b d dz dzh dž g gq> /s ɬ ʃ x ħ h/ <s sh š kh ħ h> /z ɮ ʒ ɣ/ <z zh ž gh> /w j l ɾ r ʕ/ <w y l r r ǧ> /i i: u u:/ <i í u ú> /e e: o o:/ <e é o ó> /a a:/ <a á> Pharyngealization is indicated by placing the lette...
by All4Ɇn
10 Feb 2021 07:11
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 436
Views: 23828

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

"Ich bin tanzen" to me has a bit of a prospective nuance, as the change of place usually implies some passing of time. Wikipedia calls this Absentiv. How common is this form in spoken German? I've studied German for years and have never heard anything about this! I would've just assumed it was an i...
by All4Ɇn
01 Feb 2021 19:43
Forum: Games
Topic: Sound Changes Game v2
Replies: 601
Views: 52434

Re: Sound Changes Game v2

<úvoyxéo>

[ˈəʊ̯vvɒɪ̯xxæːʊ̯] > [œvæˈçæːʊ̯]
by All4Ɇn
01 Feb 2021 18:14
Forum: Games
Topic: Romanization game #2
Replies: 1076
Views: 72236

Re: Romanization game #2

/p pʰ pʼ t tʰ tʼ k kʰ kʼ k͡p k͡pʰ k͡pʼ/ <p ph b t th d k kh g kp kph gb> /f s ʃ h/ <f s ś h> /t͡s t͡sʰ t͡sʼ t͡ʃ t͡ʃʰ t͡ʃʼ/ <c ch dc ć ćh dć> /m n ŋ ŋ͡m/ <m n ng ngm> /l j w/ <l y w> /r/ <r> /i iː u uː/ <i í o u> /e eː/ <e é> /a aː/ <a á> Aa Áa Bb Cc Ćć Dd Ee Éé Ff Gg Hh Ii Íí Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Uu Pp Rr...
by All4Ɇn
31 Jan 2021 22:31
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 792
Views: 209693

Re: False cognates

:hun: metsz "cut"
:deu: Metzger "butcher"
by All4Ɇn
27 Jan 2021 16:47
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 792
Views: 209693

Re: False cognates

eldin raigmore wrote: 26 Jan 2021 03:12 I seriously thought (still think?) “lazuli” had etymology in common with “azure”?
Those two have the same origin etymologically. Azure comes from French which dropped the initial /l/, perceiving it to be the definite article.
by All4Ɇn
26 Jan 2021 02:11
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 792
Views: 209693

Re: False cognates

:chn: 吠瑠璃 fèi liú lí "lapis lazuli" & :jpn: 瑠璃 ruri "lapis lazuli"
:eng: (lapis) lazuli
liú lí and ruri are both remarkably similar sounding to lazuli but are etymologically unrelated. The Chinese and Japanese word comes from Sanskrit while the English one comes from Persian.
by All4Ɇn
20 Jan 2021 02:31
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Skaalinska
Replies: 13
Views: 1291

Re: Skaalinska

eldin raigmore wrote: 20 Jan 2021 02:21 Suffixed? Or encliticized?
Encliticized is definitely the more accurate term here. Updating the original post.
by All4Ɇn
20 Jan 2021 01:06
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Skaalinska
Replies: 13
Views: 1291

Re: Skaalinska

Definite Articles Definite articles are encliticized after the noun they refer to. The left is for masculine/feminine nouns while the right is for neuter nouns. All articles other than -na cause a single syllable noun to take pitch 1. Nominative Singular: -en/-et Oblique Singular: -en/-et Genitive ...
by All4Ɇn
18 Jan 2021 02:51
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Skaalinska
Replies: 13
Views: 1291

Re: Skaalinska

Irregular Nouns 14 nouns don't fit into the previous declension patterns. With the exception of madur, all of these exceptions occur in nominative/oblique plural form Umlaut Two masculine nouns undergo an umlaut and pitch change with no suffix in the nominative/oblique plural: 1. Fader (father) -> ...
by All4Ɇn
13 Jan 2021 16:02
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Skaalinska
Replies: 13
Views: 1291

Re: Skaalinska

Neuter Nouns The strong and weak neuter nouns have identical declensions with the exception of the genitive plural. All neuter nouns ending in -a take the weak declension pattern. Only 2 native nouns, lunga (lung) and hærta (heart) take this pattern (and only lunga is regular); all other nouns with...
by All4Ɇn
09 Jan 2021 17:45
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Skaalinska
Replies: 13
Views: 1291

Re: Skaalinska

Weak Feminine Nouns All feminine nouns ending in -a take this pattern. The use of the spelling <or> in the plural for /ʊr/ is a borrowing from Swedish and solely used to distinguish this ending from the ending <ur> which is pronounced /ər/. <o> does not represent /ʊ/ anywhere else in Skaalinska. No...
by All4Ɇn
06 Jan 2021 17:50
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Skaalinska
Replies: 13
Views: 1291

Re: Skaalinska

Strong Feminine & Weak Masculine Nouns Rather confusingly, these two categories share the same declension pattern. For masculine nouns its used for nouns ending in a vowel or /r/, those from Old Norse ending in /l n s/ which did not have the nominative ending -ʀ, as well as the noun Gud (God). For ...
by All4Ɇn
03 Jan 2021 17:41
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Skaalinska
Replies: 13
Views: 1291

Re: Skaalinska

Having looked at East Norse, I've decided I'm going to have to keep it as a West Norse language as one of the main reasons old grammatical features of Old Norse have been maintained in Skaalinska is due to the U-umlaut which from my understanding East Norse dropped early on. With this in mind, I'm g...