Search found 543 matches

by Maximillian
10 Oct 2012 11:13
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7348
Views: 946210

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Xonen wrote:Although in Russian, from a synchronic point of view at least, it could be argued that the stem of the word is actually zamk-, and the -o- that gets added in the nominative singular is epenthetic.
What about the fact that this "epenthetic" vowel is stressed?
by Maximillian
09 Oct 2012 18:37
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: Introduction thread(s)
Replies: 632
Views: 222133

Re: Introduction thread(s)

Cool, another Israeli! Welcome!
by Maximillian
18 Aug 2012 08:31
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 11792
Views: 1422765

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Keenir wrote:But what do you do when one of the realizations is no sound? Could I say Initial <'> can be realized as both ['] and as [ ].?
Initial <'> can be realized as both ['] and as [Ø]
or
Initial <'> can be realized as both ['] and as zero sound
by Maximillian
28 Jul 2012 09:48
Forum: Beginners' Corner
Topic: Where can get info on Celticlangs?
Replies: 12
Views: 1557

Re: Where can get info on Celticlangs?

The Celtic Languages (Martin J. Ball and Nicole Müller)
by Maximillian
20 Jul 2012 21:16
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7348
Views: 946210

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Not sure if this belongs here, but...
Can anyone point me to some books about the history of writing? Preferably not something heavily academic, more in a spirit of popular science.
by Maximillian
19 Jul 2012 07:14
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7348
Views: 946210

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

thaen wrote:In languages with past/non-past distinction, which is marked?
The "past" is usually marked, AFAIK; or both.
Look at Germanic and Uralic languages for examples.
by Maximillian
17 Jul 2012 12:13
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Conlanging Course for University
Replies: 17
Views: 4078

Re: Conlanging Course for University

Trajan wrote:Would that be the presentation that lsd just posted?
Yes, that is it.
by Maximillian
16 Jul 2012 20:09
Forum: Teach & Share
Topic: Conlanging Course for University
Replies: 17
Views: 4078

Re: Conlanging Course for University

I remember that Trailsend did some presentation explaining conlanging and using Feayran examples.

Would be interesting to see what you'll end up with. Please don't forget to share. [;)]
by Maximillian
10 Jul 2012 21:56
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Menlish, the language of MEN!
Replies: 69
Views: 8507

Re: Menlish, the language of MEN!

Micamo wrote:...because men don't know how to admit when they're wrong.
I think you confuse us with women... :roll:
by Maximillian
06 Jul 2012 20:21
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Menlish, the language of MEN!
Replies: 69
Views: 8507

Re: Menlish, the language of MEN!

nmn wrote:gɹa gagr gɻa gagr gɾa gagr gʀa gagr gʁa gagr!
gaɾ... [:'(]
by Maximillian
06 Jul 2012 19:07
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Menlish, the language of MEN!
Replies: 69
Views: 8507

Re: Menlish, the language of MEN!

Can we have more rhotic sounds, like [ɹ], [ɻ], [r], [ɾ], [ʀ] and [ʁ]? Also, rhotics could be syllabic.
by Maximillian
04 Jul 2012 20:57
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: The worst sounding natlang ever
Replies: 234
Views: 32357

Re: The worst sounding natlang ever

Chagen wrote:I don't really see much a of a difference between, say, "I hate the sound of Arabic" and "I hate people who speak Arabic".
This is just silly. So, I hate the sound of pop music, does it mean I hate all those who create it and listen to it?
by Maximillian
04 Jul 2012 20:52
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: How natlangs look in the future!
Replies: 124
Views: 13170

Re: How natlangs look in the future!

All verbs in Ivrit use the א aleph to mark the FUT.1SG like the quote upstairs? Is א used to mark any other future numbers/persons/genders? Yes, yes it does. However, it is a tricky way to describe it. Aleph itself is not pronounced anymore in modern Hebrew, and in writing it acts more like vowel-b...
by Maximillian
04 Jul 2012 16:54
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: How natlangs look in the future!
Replies: 124
Views: 13170

Re: How natlangs look in the future!

I have some predictions about the future of Colloquial Hebrew: The sound [h] (I am not sure if it could be called a phoneme anymore) will finally disappear; today it is hardly used anyway. The future 1PS marker will change from the today correct א to more commonly used י: ani y ileḥ instead of ani e...
by Maximillian
04 Jul 2012 14:54
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Favorite Phoneme!
Replies: 421
Views: 38665

Re: Favorite Phoneme!

I just love to make [ʀ]! It tickles the throat nicely. :roll:
by Maximillian
04 Jul 2012 14:47
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: The worst sounding natlang ever
Replies: 234
Views: 32357

Re: The worst sounding natlang ever

I don't like the sound of Arabic. I hear it all the time, and no matter who's the speaker and what they speak about, it just sounds awful. Yep. I used to hate French, but I've learned to tolerate it. I still think it's probably the most overrated language on the planet , though. [+1] And German is t...
by Maximillian
03 Jul 2012 07:52
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Things that are too common
Replies: 59
Views: 5286

Re: Things that are too common

C.J. wrote:Or maybe I'm completely wrong and Indo-European is the only family without tonal languages.
Even among IE there are/were somewhat tonal languages: Norwegian and Swedish, Slovenian and Serbo-Croatian, Ancient Greek, Latvian and Lithuanian, etc.
by Maximillian
01 Jul 2012 15:31
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 7348
Views: 946210

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Any one know a good way to write a language with palatalization using the roman alphabet? It also has the semivowel [j] that I already write as /j/ Whenever I encounter problems such as this, I look for inspiration in languages that have the same features. So, palatalisation? There's Polish , Czech...