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by Nortaneous
17 Feb 2021 07:13
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 237
Views: 18474

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

I recently feel like making a maximally a-priori "SAE" language (phonology and grammar) which, ironically, is outside of my comfort zone. That got me thinking about a maximally SAE non-SAE phonology. If I've done everything correctly, which I almost certainly haven't, this should score 100 on that ...
by Nortaneous
30 Jan 2021 20:59
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 399
Views: 25495

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Japanese had a lot of /k/s disappear at one point of its development, especially before /i u/ (tho /k/s were reinserted before /u/s in most dialects, or some verbs and adjectives had forms with a /k/ and forms with it dropped). Question: could there be a similar sound change for /t/ in some languag...
by Nortaneous
12 Dec 2020 09:31
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 399
Views: 25495

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So, I noticed some natlangs where /b/ is the only voiced stop. I'm wondering what could have given rise to this asymmetry, as I want to incorporate it into my own phonology. One podcast I listen to says that in Arapaho, it's because the /m/ shifted to /b/ or something like that. Yet, there are some...
by Nortaneous
07 Dec 2020 00:34
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 399
Views: 25495

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

How could the three affricates and the three sibilants have arisen? I find Slavic/Romance k => t͡ɕ change a bit boring. High German had t => t͡s but such an unconditioned change doesn't create interesting morphological alterations. Consonants p t t͡s t͡ʂ t͡ɕ k q <p t c č ć k q> s ʂ ɕ <s š ś> m n ŋ ...
by Nortaneous
17 Feb 2020 19:58
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Californian Polynesian
Replies: 55
Views: 3773

Re: Californian Polynesian

There are Polynesian languages whose consonant inventories have been expanded by language contact. Rennellese: /p t k ŋg ʔ s h β~mb l~ð ɣ m n ŋ/. Basic vocabulary in Rennellese has /ʔ h/ but specialized vocabulary doesn't; specialized vocabulary has /ð ɣ/ but basic vocabulary doesn't. Words with /ɣ/...
by Nortaneous
05 Feb 2020 21:15
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 399
Views: 25495

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Since some of the reconstructions for Old Japanese vowels involves both rising and falling diphthongs, I'm considering having palatalization of both consonants before rising palatal diphthongs (I'm not sure I'll do anything with velarization or rounding), and consonants after falling diphthings (wh...
by Nortaneous
31 Jan 2020 19:39
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Jäzik Panúski
Replies: 52
Views: 10765

Re: Jäzik Panúski

There are Slavic languages that developed front rounded vowels. They can be reconstructed as intermediates in at least Czech and Ukrainian, and are preserved in some present-day Slovenian dialects. Some sound changes that led to the development of front rounded vowels in various Slovenian dialects: ...
by Nortaneous
19 Jan 2020 09:05
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 399
Views: 25495

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

wintiver wrote: 18 Jan 2020 18:07 If anyone knows of having multiple sibilants like this please let me know. Much appreciated.
some Northwest Caucasian and Qiangic languages have four sibilant POAs - for example, Ubykh and Ersu
by Nortaneous
17 Jan 2020 13:14
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Eskêl (Carpathian Bulgar) Scratchpad
Replies: 106
Views: 6964

Re: Eskêl (Carpathian Bulgar) Scratchpad

In fact, no language written in Cyrillic has such orthographic depth as English or French; the deepest might be Chechen and Ingush, but that could be due to the "deficiency" of their orthographies designed by Soviet experts (i.e. they might've failed to notice some oppositions in the vowel system l...
by Nortaneous
08 Dec 2019 04:25
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 237
Views: 18474

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

Ontena Gadsup I... I-... I don't even. I HAVE BEEN LIVING A LIE Papuan languages sometimes get like that. Kobon has a voicing contrast in affricates but not plosives - its full consonant inventory is: tɕ b d dʑ g ɸ s x h m n ɲ ŋ l ʎ w ɾ ɽ j /x/ varies freely between [x kx kʰ], so there's that, but ...
by Nortaneous
12 Nov 2019 19:55
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 237
Views: 18474

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

I'm not sure about this, but I seem to remember that no languages distinguishing a front and a central /a/ is precisely the reason why no separate symbols for the two exist in IPA. However, a language that does distinguish them may have been discovered since the invention of the IPA. The Hamont dia...
by Nortaneous
27 Oct 2019 23:41
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Languages with interesting phonotactics
Replies: 23
Views: 9941

Re: Languages with interesting phonotactics

Solarius wrote: 22 Oct 2019 21:49 IIRC there's a Qiangic language which recently underwent monosyllabicization, but in such a way that the permitted clusters were identical in onset and coda--i.e. [ClaCl] was valid but [ClalC] wasn't.
Ronghong Qiang, described in LaPolla's grammar
by Nortaneous
22 Oct 2019 15:42
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: Languages with interesting phonotactics
Replies: 23
Views: 9941

Re: Languages with interesting phonotactics

Allowing /s/ + stop clusters to begin a syllable is actually one of Indo-European peculiarities , since these clusters also go against the sonority hierarchy. In that context Western Romance languages which put a vowel before these clusters are actually making things more normal! It's not that weir...
by Nortaneous
16 Sep 2019 06:51
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here [2010-2020]
Replies: 11605
Views: 1545035

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Vlürch wrote: 14 Sep 2019 21:57 The links could be marked with "nostalgia warning (or cringe warning if you're a totes no homo bro)",
Dir en Grey isn't that gay - look up Daigo Stardust
by Nortaneous
24 Aug 2019 20:09
Forum: Games
Topic: Romanization game #2
Replies: 1076
Views: 71911

Re: Romanization game #2

Speaking of which, part 2: /p t k m n j l w h a i u e o d t͡ʃʼ ʙ ŋʘ↑ʼ k͡ʟ̝̊ːʷ gǂ͡˞χˀ ᶣɞ̂ˑ ʬᴙ!!/ Let's keep it simple and assign sounds to letters in alphabetical order: <a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v>. So a hypothetical example sentence /ŋʘ↑ʼuk͡ʟ̝̊ːʷaʙi gǂ͡˞χˀaʬᴙ!!o pi t͡ʃʼehiŋʘ↑ʼu/ ...
by Nortaneous
24 Aug 2019 08:44
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here [2010-2020]
Replies: 11605
Views: 1545035

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

the only language I know of with *tʰ > r̥ is Nivkh, and Nivkh doesn't object at all to /r̥/ in clusters
by Nortaneous
24 Aug 2019 08:44
Forum: Games
Topic: Romanization game #2
Replies: 1076
Views: 71911

Re: Romanization game #2

ɶʙ ɞʛ wrote: 24 Aug 2019 01:24 Is an /ħ/ vs /ʜ/ distinction even attested?
yes, in Aghul and (according to PHOIBLE) Bats
by Nortaneous
16 Aug 2019 06:14
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: False cognates
Replies: 792
Views: 209468

Re: False cognates

:eng: quick Old Chinese 霍 /*qʰʷaːɡ/ - quickly, suddenly Maybe it's a bit of a stretch, but they do have similar meanings and velars and uvulars aren't that different. Also, even though I don't know of one, I wouldn't be too surprised if there was some English dialect where "quick" is pronounced [kw...
by Nortaneous
16 Aug 2019 06:08
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here [2010-2020]
Replies: 11605
Views: 1545035

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Is there a way to get [fˠ → ʍ], with [ʍ] being a true fricative? Woleaian had *f *pʷ > f ɸʷ (and Proto-Micronesian *f patterned as palatalized - cf. *f > ɦʲ in Marshallese), and Irish Gaelic has vʲ/w - so yes, you can just do that Does any natlang feature (a set of) preglottalized (voiceless) nasal...