Cooking and dining!

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Linguifex
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Cooking and dining!

Post by Linguifex »

Well, don't leave us hanging! What are kitchens like in your conworld?
Edit: Modicone: Changed the title. I was so close to deleting this for being a terrible joke.
Edit: Linguifex: For those not in the know, my post was originally a response to a spammer.
Last edited by Linguifex on 25 May 2014 16:26, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Khemehekis »

On the planet of Javarti in the Lehola Galaxy, kitchens and dining rooms are equipped not only with forks, knives, spoons and chopsticks, but also siltis. A silti has several velcro-like spikes on it that allow food to stick to it.
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eldin raigmore
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by eldin raigmore »

I think I want gastronomy, cuisine, etc., to be very "big" (e.g. important art-forms) among the Adpihi; but I've done nothing specific about it yet.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by CatDoom »

The ʔuuleo (an Akanan conpeople living on the northwest coast of Peliaš) place a great deal of social importance on preparing and sharing food. Their agricultural staples are buckwheat and dairy products (made primarily from goat milk), but they supplement these with fish, game and wild plants gathered from the surrounding temperate rain forest.

Traditional ʔuuleo delicacies include knife-cut buckwheat noodles which may, depending on the season, be served cold with fresh vegetables or hot in an herbed broth made with fish or animal bones, and sææ, a tea-like infusion of wild herbs. Sææ may be drunk plain, with lightly salted butter (kičææ), or with milk and honey (giiišææ, often served to children as a treat). The preparation of sææ is a traditional duty of ʔuuleo wives and mothers, and each family generally has their own preferred blend of herbs, passed down from mother to daughter for generations.

The ʔuuleo also make cheeses of varying firmness and yoghurt-based beverages and sauces, and brew beer and mead.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

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eldin raigmore
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by eldin raigmore »

I like both CatDoom's and prettydragoon's posts, for completely opposite reasons.
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Foolster41
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Foolster41 »

Kitchens are pretty simple in Saltha. A small oven/cooking fire and a counter space to work is all that's really needed.

Salthan cooking mostly consist of making things that can be easily eaten with the fingers, or simply drunk from a cup.

They have "regular" foods like dried salted fish, various kinds of meats and bread.

The favorite national dish of Saltha is called Shasulnal , which is bread with fish, spices and vegitables baked inside.

Udesknask finely chopped vegetables (and sometimes meat) wrapped in a large edible leaf (such as grape leaf), fried and usually served with a vinegar sauce to dip.

Relaikesasesh is a spicy poultry soup, and Relshasesh is a spicy fish soup. Traditionally they are served with a a piece of bread that's in a form of a scoop, but in modern times with the advent of food processors, there is a variant of this dish, usually called Relaikeesash (lit. "spicy poultry water") and Relshasash (lit. "spicy fish water) respetively, which is much more pulpified and is simply drunk.

Shekshasa is fresh raw fish that's salted and dipped in citrus juice. Before refridgeration this was only available on the coastal cities, since even with the salting it would have to be very fresh to be safe to eat,

To drink, Salthans enjoy Hodnaksashe, a wine made form fermented cactus.
Gilesshase (lit. Sweetwater) is a strong drink made from sugarcane.
Chersashe is a novelty wine that is fermented with a cricket inside it.
relnakshase is Sweetwater blended with black tea.
Girelgishu is a wine that's been fortified with sweetwater.

I wish I had more on different regional foods, or how Salthan cooking has changed through the centuries, but I haven't gotten that far yet. I've tried, but I'm a bit overwelmed with where to even begin. I feel like I need to flesh out the "character" of their food and come up with more kinds of dishes first maybe.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Yačay256 »

The Cooperative People's Republic of Yeatuf (/ˈjəä̯.tɨf/; also as the CPRY for short) is in a slightly alternate Earth's Bismark Archipelago, Yeatuf cuisine thus reflects both my own tastes coupled with what would be available to a developed country in that area.

The main staples are bananas (most importantly of the fehi group, but also of many cultivators from other groups), ube and air potato yams, taro and sweet potatoes. These are mostly processed into flatbreads or noodles or are simply cooked whole in various ways.

Protein comes from plants and aquatic meats. With regards to plants, the chief source is the winged bean - whose seeds alone are made into many things such as tofu, tempeh, flour and a type of plant milk. Other sources of plant protein include sea vegetables, wattleseed and certain nuts. As for aquatic meats, most come from aquaculture and these include abalones, lobsters, cobia, sole, marine and freshwater snails, gouramis, eel-tailed catfish, kuruma prawns and giant tiger prawns, redclaws, scallops, oysters, flower crabs and mud crabs.

Vegetables and fruits are diverse.

The main sweetener is sugar, mostly from palms but also from sugarcane. Sugarbag and honey is also used.

Little red meat or poultry is eaten, and both types of meat are very expensive. Other protein sources include many species of insects, some farmed, such as bee brood, termite pupae, mealworms and ants and their eggs. Sago grubs are considered a delicacy.

Most food is prepared as stir-fries, stews or soups or salads. A modern country, Yeatuf kitchens are small but with all the necessary modern conveniences, such as solid surface glass worktops, absorption refrigerators, induction samovars, gas stoves, toaster ovens and so on. People sit cross-legged on cushions while they eat at low tables.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Lambuzhao »

Kitchens themselves on most of Tirga are messy, dimly lit, never as clean as they should be, affairs. They often double or triple as apothecaries or alchemical laboratories, when necessity requires.

As for cuisine on Tirga, that's another thing entirely.

The two main grains on Tirga are millet (Tetrasetaria spp) and koodra (Paspalorum spp.). In fact, the cooler more temperate parts of Tirga are the "Millet Lands", while the more tropical regions of Tirga are known collectively as "Koodra Land".They are used to make gruels, milks, crispbreads, Leafwrap stuffings, and noodles.

\Potacomestibles include soups, stews served with crusty leavened breads, flat crispbreads, or woowads of steaming millet, koodra, kashi. A subsection of soups is the gruels, which are any mashed grain or nut potacomestible, lightly seasoned. These come in two forms: raw and fermented. Raw include the gamut of liquidy (cebada, avena, horchata), to the more congealed foods like rice-pudding or polenta. I am using decidedly Terran terminology here to provide ready comparison. More on the actual foodstuffs is forthcoming. Although somewhat labor intensive, nut & grains milks are also
popular and refreshing drinks. Two popular ones are made from furzeik (a descendant of Quercus, with fist-sized acorns), and chatyo-seed (an arborescent descendant of either Dandelion or possibly Sunflower).

The fermented gruels are used mostly for sacrificial purposes, but also gave rise (in strained form) to a number of popular spirits on Tirga.

Meats are legion. There are a number of descendents of pigs mucking about wild on Tirga, and they form the basis of an unending list of pupular dishes. Next comes coney, which refers to descendants of rabbits, although they are mostly used for pack animals and dairy purposes. Third, there is cuy, which are large lumbering descendants of guinea-pigs. These are used for dairy and some meat production, and in some places, are used as draft animals. There are also the hulking
Edit: poggles bossums
and graceful voalthra, which are descendants of the Virginia Opposum. Their meat is sweet and not unlike lamb. A rare delicacy is the mighty bullross, which is an aquatic monster of rodentine descent (Nutria? Beaver?).

Apart from meat, some animals like the coney and cuy, produce milk and milk-products. Because of its rich, heavy consistency, bunream (a.k.a. coney milk) is used to make a popular comfort food called muscarpone. It is said that the best muscarpone is to be had from does which feed on the herbs and bryophytes of the deep woodlands. It is prepared through clabbering with rennet, vinegar, or some other acidic congealant. It is often fresh, and is not unlike whipped cream cheese or farmer's cheese. It can be aged, but no more than 1-2 months. It is light yellow with a brownish rind, and has a slightly spicy, subtley nutty flavor. Muscarpone with berries on crispbread is a most popular treat for breckesse, or any time of day (the various names for meals and their times of day will be discussed later).

Fowl are also popular. Phonnixes are a noble bird that usually grace the table on special occasions during Lesser Hustniçe (more or less Autumn, after Indian Summer) and Quinqox (i.e. winter). It is not entirely clear from genetic testing what the provenance of the Phonnix is. Some populations seem to be of Pheasant lineage, while others seem to be of mixed Galliform x Phasianid heritage. Either way, they are good eating, especially with Otumbleberry preserves.

As for seafood, the following are among popular choices. Muddy lakes and estuaries are home to the enormous Monstruo, a bluish bememoth of carp descent, and fatheads (catfish). Rivers are home to speedy tiger trout and mosaicfish, and others whose names I cannot recall. But the most popular "fish" of all is not technically piscine. They are the mullygrubs, which are neonatenous descendants frogs or toads. They go by countless names: squiggles, taillies, uglies, pug-uglies, muddiwhorls, whumps, spankies, higguts, chubs, chubsies, chubwhumpers, taddies, pollies, nibblers, scooters, etc. They are basically large tadpoles. Although it's been said that these are the larvae of the ginormic Wheuchre-Peuchres of hirquitallient voice, this is not true. The actual rumor is that they were bred specifically with a gastronomic focus. Mullygrubs have virtually no skeleton to worry about, have large muscular tails, and all the "guts" are easily separated from the tail-meat. Thus, because of their utility and ubiquity, mulligrubs are to seafood what swine are to land-based cuisine.

But that's not to discount another denizen, the Crowned Prince of the creeks and swamps of Tirga.
That is the Crawdad, or yabbie or crawfish. These crustaceans rule the pots and cauldrons of the lacustrine and riparian regions. The uses for these tasty morsels, both culinary and other, can fit whole tomes in and of themselves (which they have!). Suffice it only to mention Ceathair Ghalkhrefandr's voluminous
work 1,001 Days of the Crawdad. In a word: Yum!

So much more to say. I haven't even gotten into Vegetables, Gums, Fungi (both Sessile and Motile), Mealtimes, Tableware, Beverages (Soft, Spirited and Toxic), nor Noodles, Dumplings and Leafwraps, oh my!

Bon Appetit!
Last edited by Lambuzhao on 24 May 2014 13:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Khemehekis »

Poggles?!? Do silver spiders eat them too?
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Lambuzhao »

Poggles already taken?! Really?! So that's what these were called-
http://images3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb2 ... Poggle.jpg

:?: [}:(]

Fudge.

My name was originally based on the word "puggles" which are baby platypuses.

It's supposed to be a big, fat, bearlike opposum, like this-
http://www.shawnolson.net/media/1/image ... m_2785.jpg

http://www.shawnolson.net/media/1/image ... m_2776.jpg

http://www.terrierman.com/BossPossumAurora.JPG


Well, thanks for the heads-up. Based on the jpg above, I think I'll rename them Bossums (Pelorodidelphis aurora).
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Re: Cooking and dining

Post by Felbah »

The Amutetikam people of the Amutet continent enjoy large feasts and tables laid out with food. Their religion creates a necessity to have many meals to dedicate to the gods. This is generally what happens in an Amutetikam dinner:

The lord of a settlement or tribe calls all the other lords, chiefs, and anyone else to dinner. They arrive, flustered and dirty from bareback horse riding. They take a bath in some heated springs, which hopefully, the lord of the manor would have chosen well...
Then, after a long and well awaited sleep, the chefs prepare for the so-called 'day of eating'. This is the day which everyone in the settlement gets to eat as much as they can, washed down with warmed water from cleaner springs. Roast and char-grilled pork bellies, chickens and vegetables are just some of the seven courses. The second-last course is the main course - sometimes, a whole meal can be decided by this dish and how good it tastes. For not only does this show the chef's expertise, but also it purportedly shows the gods' favour upon the settlement. The best horse in the settlement (very often the lord's own horse) would be sacrificed, and the remaining meat would be cooked in a similar manner. The best meals have fruit glazes and other exquisite shows of chef's brilliance, but the horse on its own can be good. Prayers are said in between each mouthful.
Finally, the dessert. It has been said that the Amutetikum people were the first to invent the dessert. All they know is how to make a good one. In a very similar way to how aputen is made, the fruit would have fermented and would then have been made into a pie. A very large pie. Enough for each member around the table to have at least two large pieces, and the thicker and richer it is, the better according to most chiefs.
Then, they sleep, ready for the next day. The next day is a day of religious observance, where each member of the group will dress in their oldest clothes and eat only bread. But the bread is usually very good, as it is made by the same experienced chef as for the rest of the meal. Church ceremonies happen, and while it is not a solemn occasion, there is none of the same merrymaking as in the day before.
Thirdly, the day of drinking. Aputen (a fruit liqueur), fresh from the mountains where it has been frozen, is brought down, usually to the adoration of most of the crowd of people. The day of drinking is not just about the drinking - it is also about how much partying can be had in one day. Jesters perform, dances are danced, but most often, there are a good deal of drunken people by the end.
Finally, the day of trade. This day is effectively a carnival, where everyone in the land is invited to trade and buy things. Food, trinkets, pets, even livestock is bought and sold at these days. But, after a while it must come to an end. After another sleep, the caravans make their ways home. Thus ends the feast.
As you can probably guess, feasting is a large part of Amutetikam culture. They love a good feast, and believe that it performs a religious duty and will get them favour amongst the gods.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Linguifex »

Felbah wrote:Thirdly, the day of drinking. Aputen (a fruit liqueur), fresh from the mountains where it has been frozen, is brought down, usually to the adoration of most of the crowd of people. The day of drinking is not just about the drinking - it is also about how much partying can be had in one day. Jesters perform, dances are danced, but most often, there are a good deal of drunken people by the end.
Finally, the day of trade. This day is effectively a carnival, where everyone in the land is invited to trade and buy things. Food, trinkets, pets, even livestock is bought and sold at these days. But, after a while it must come to an end. After another sleep, the caravans make their ways home. Thus ends the feast.
Why the drinking before the trading? I would think it quite trying to do business while hung over.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

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Linguifex wrote:
Felbah wrote:Thirdly, the day of drinking. Aputen (a fruit liqueur), fresh from the mountains where it has been frozen, is brought down, usually to the adoration of most of the crowd of people. The day of drinking is not just about the drinking - it is also about how much partying can be had in one day. Jesters perform, dances are danced, but most often, there are a good deal of drunken people by the end.
Finally, the day of trade. This day is effectively a carnival, where everyone in the land is invited to trade and buy things. Food, trinkets, pets, even livestock is bought and sold at these days. But, after a while it must come to an end. After another sleep, the caravans make their ways home. Thus ends the feast.
Why the drinking before the trading? I would think it quite trying to do business while hung over.
T'is true, but most of them don't want to travel home in that state either. And it goes on for the entire day, which the noblepeople spend most of the early hours trying to get themselves fully un-hungover.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Linguifex »

Khemehekis wrote:On the planet of Javarti in the Lehola Galaxy, kitchens and dining rooms are equipped not only with forks, knives, spoons and chopsticks, but also siltis. A silti has several velcro-like spikes on it that allow food to stick to it.
What kinds of foods do you normally use a silti to eat?
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Khemehekis »

Linguifex wrote:
Khemehekis wrote:On the planet of Javarti in the Lehola Galaxy, kitchens and dining rooms are equipped not only with froks, knives, spoons and chopsticks, but also siltis. A silti has several velcro-like spikes on it that allow food to stick to it.
What kinds of foods do you normally use a silti to eat?
From my Javarti page:

The Javartis cultivate many of their own plants. Fruits include the tetramerous kaga; the aggregate, bubble-shaped ükha; the wavy-bumped jata; the soyko (a xylocarp like the coconut, with brown outside and cream inside); the kündu, with diagonal bumpy waves on its outside; the cherry-shaped semilti, with many tiny seeds inside; the peachy, beige-yellow tabeymu with a creamy inside; and the phallic tayga. Vegetables inlude the asparagus-like, thin vümu, the qaqoxü, a wavy-patterned squash-like vegetable that is botanically a fruit; the echeverria- or rose-like vegetables such as the alko, roga and dzosotu; the kohlrabi-like khordu; the stalky mükaysta with edible, little round leaves; the lefay garza; and the luzdi (a sausage-shaped tuber) and asanvi (two-lobed white tuber, also cultivated for its sugar). The three most important olvas (an order of pseudograins) are ghaylva, temni and zdanka. The vervi is grown for its nut. Ratxi, with its magenta, bird-of-paradise-like flowers, is the main fiber plant of Javarti. The neküstu, with its rhomboid shape, is an important hardwood tree. Ornamental flowers include the yellow-and-purple zdikhi and the spadix-and-spathe yellow-and-white tsanqa. Joysana, with its leaves that start out straight up than wilt out at the ends and its white flowers, its grown for its infusion. The mirga is a tall, billowing tree that produces seed-pods with green, triangular seeds packed with protein -- the equivalent of legumes in the Javarti biosphere. Juli, with its white, four-petaled flowers, is grown for its depressant drug juliksa (similar to drinking kava). Wild plants include the ango, a tropical tree; the nalpozgita, a tropical epiphyte that looks something like a giant oak leaf; and the aqi, an ornamental herbaceous plant with leaves of three. Domesticated rengadzis include the dzolmu, a pet that lives on scraps; the nüsta, a small, furry pet with a beaver-like tail that fills much the same role as a guinea pig or hamster; the ghotxo; cultivated for its meat and well as shaven for its heavy coat of renga; the kono, a carnivorous pet that can also pull ploughs and chase wild quarry; and the dapalvu, an indulgently delicious creature. Domesticated khüvas (the ornithologue, or bird-analogue, bioswath on Javarti) include the egg-laying pongha with its oval torso, and the squat, short-tailed edible maqi. The münetxi, a khüva, is often kept for its ability to pollinate bigger flowers, while the tibo, a snouted kheski (six-legged insectologue), pollinates most smaller flowers and is often raised for this purpose by farmers.

Javarti cuisine pulls mainly on the culinary strength of its native animals and plants (plus the occasional mushroom). Fruits, vegetables, olvas, nuts, meat, seafood and mirgas are the main food-groups in the Javarti diet. Culinary fruits include the kaga, ükha, jata, soyko, kündu, semilti, tabeymu and tayga, all eaten as snacks, desserts, juiced, or as flavorings or parts of sweets. Many dishes included mixed vegetables or meat, seafood or qasa mixed with vegetables. Qaqoxü fills the role of cucumber or squash in these dishes, while alkos, rogas and dzosotus have a more leaf-vegetable-like or Brussels-sproot-like texture. Garza is popular as a leaf vegetable, the standard salad herb of Javarti. Mükaysta is often eaten as a main course. Vümu can be eaten alone but is more often mixed with other vegetables. Pickled vümu, or azgi, is used whenever a pickled vegetable is called for in a recipe. Khordu is usually eaten alone but can be sliced up. And luzdi is eaten baked, mashed, fried, steamed, candied or as chops. All-vegetable dishes include vegetable soup; salted luzdi; ubali (oval-shaped pieces of luzdi baked on a sheet and then turned upside-down so the unexposed side is facing up and topped with sweet toppings); Seylvi's special (mükaysta with sliced roga and sliced qaqoxü alko, riga and dzosotu with azgi); and khaba (baked luzdi with azgi and qaqoxü).

The rengadzi animals most often eaten are the ghotxo (whose meat is called vuri), the dapalvu (whose meat is called palvu), the zayma (a seal-like creature renowned for its blubber called dzesti), and the pürmo (a favorite hunting target), Edible khüvas include the maqi (whose meat is called üngolu), the pongha (whose meat is called jinkhu), the wild, sharp-nosed, arrow-tailed vilkha, the ring-necked arvu, the bumpy-nosed matürvi, and the large, plesiosaur-necked djilghano. Popular seafood includes the armadillo-shelled, wobbling txiva with antennae and barbels; the ampoyla, which looks like a cross betweem a sea slug and a caterpillar; the six-legged, triangular zgendi; and such types of lonkho (a four-legged, meaty, flat-bodied class of animal) as the lobster-bodied, moustached, white-eyed ampova; the dzasta (a barbeled, bell-curve-and-its-mirror shaped creature) and the chunky poynu, with bumps going down its back. Some creatures have special terms for the meat of their young: a baby ghotxo is a pingha, and pingha meat is called ezbü a baby dapalvu is called a vanonda, and vanonda meat is called khepa; a maqi under two years is called a rezda, and rezda meat is called urarsa; and a pongha under three years is called a dardü, and dardü meat is called tsatxi. Vuri and palvu steaks are revered as high-class eat-out dining. Ground vuri is known as rurzi. Sausages of palvu in ghotxo intestine are called ghiburta, and sausages of khüva in dapalvu intestine are called djavu. Burtanga is sliced sausage filled with palvu blood in zayma intestine and seasoned with salt then set out to dry for three days. Lunch meat includes layba (vilkha organ meats with salt, cut into circles), bubu poqa (pongha organ meats mixed in a blender with pongha eggs and cooked in juices), and malmoyvi (dapalvu organ meats cooked in pongha fat and a hot sauce, leaving red circle-shaped bumps all over the finished product). Nuggets and sticks of various meats and seafoods are popular as well, especially ülqo (jinkhu sticks). The ribcages of pürmos are called jandi, and come at high price in most restaurants. Smoked dzasta strips are called isti, while smoked poynu strips are called saymüla and salted poynu strips are called noymi. The Javartis were also the inventors of qasa, a form of meat grown without brains or even heads. Qasa is fertilized with the genes of the animals it replicates, and looks and tastes just like meat or seafood, but without the ethical questions that surround raising and killing animals. Vegetarians often eat qasa, but some, the azoöproteinarians, forgo any form of animal protein, and there is even a word in LIE, "aqasarian", for people who specifically avoid eating qasa. Qasa exists for vuri, palvu, dzesti, pürmo, üngolu, jinkhu, vilkha, arvu, matürvi, djilghano, txiva, ampoyla, zgendi and most lokho species, as well as such foreign meats as pork, chicken, tapir, wenschar, fezina, shrimp, lusbukhet, lusbef and lusifes. All pet food for carnivorous pets on Javarti is now made with qasa.

Among the olvas, ghaylva is considered something like a miracle crop. This one millet-like plant, with its characteristic pairs of leaves facing each other, produces so many foods for the Javartis. Its flour made into boyla (a substance like dough), the boyla can be cooked flat on an oven to make makho or cooked with yeast to make qünsi. When it is toasted, you get ghaylva tortillas, or eyndja. An eyndja folded once like a taco and filled with food is called a dalpa. Filled with meat and mirgas and then double-cooked flat, a noykümba is made. An eyndja cooked, filled with fruits and then double-cooked produces a sweet known as a djoysa. Boyla pressed on the outside of a bowl becomes banda and is very full and thick, like a chalupa. Banda wrapped in a semicircle around meat and dzosotu becomes a jipibu, while banda in burrito shape and filled with vegetables is called a tayna. Seafood bandas are called qotoru. An eyndja cut into triangular chips is called a dendi; when this chip is topped with mirga and vegetables with possibly some khüva as well, the result is called a taylanü. When cooked with water, like pasta, an orange food called turtayna results. Turtayna can be cut into rectangular strips (sapatu), thick but long rectangles (gaynda), thin, cubical pieces (oyti), long, spaghetti-like noodles (lemitxi), something like lemitxi but even thinner (sutxi), something like lemitxi but very thin (djurna), scalloped pieces (pimiki), triangles (khusu), bowtie shapes (viqi), bagel shapes (bovoru), small rings (txodja), arches (kaymi) or giant balls of savory fillings (djineystu). The ultimate ghaylva dish is omposto, a semircircular "ball" of cooked boyla with a hole at the top, through which one can see such fillings as meat, seafood,v vegetables and mirga. Another important olva is temni, with its two broad leaves per stock and its full head of grain. Temni produces ghoynkha under most cooking conditions, which tastes like bread. When steamed it yields a pasta-like dish called txeyndi. The most popular form of txeyndi is karmanda, which resembles macaroni, although the chow-mein-like singu is also a big hit at most restaurants. A bubbly form of temni, cooked with extra yeast in a closed oven, is guysi. There is also the rice-cake-like ghoso, made from the thin, pretty-flowered olva known as zdanka. Straight zdanka grain tastes a lot like orzo, and zdanka grains uncooked can even be sprinkled onto desserts.

Several dishes combine meat/qasa with plants. Mükaysta with vuri is one of the most famous Javarti dishes. Teja combines ground palvu with alko, roga and qikhu (a paste made from mirgas). Gen. Laykeynxa's jinkhu consists of jinkhu with qaqoxü, dzosotu, mükaysta, asanvi and azgi. Xadaxa consists of asanvis and arvu with nuts and qikhu. Garza, vümu, qaqoxü, asanvi, eggs and zayma baked in a "pie" is known as axilgha. Turtayna with sausage on boyla is known as tsalba. Eggs with turtayna, or Ritxi's Breakfast, is a popular breakfast food in rural areas.

Mirgas can be eaten straight, or as paste (qikhu), or roasted (ketidji).

Sugar from the asanvi flavors candies like the spice drops and oyju (the latter of which is made from juli nectar allowed to ferment and then hardened). Many treats, such as alkos, roga, garza and luzdis, are allowed to caramelize and then they are sevred as desserts. The caramel extracted from them makes caramel candies like those sold by Brach's. Fermented caramel is popular too. Kagas, ükhas, jatas, semiltis and tabeymus are often allowed to ferment and then eaten as liqueur candies. Sugar is also often extracted from the soyko and made into cookies. Soyko and zdanka cookies are called jitepas (nakhanxas if covered with ground soyko and ango seeds), while soyko and temni cookies in bagel shape are called ogolos. Djüntas resemble doughnuts and are baked out of ghaylva.

Water is the most important drink on Javarti, but there are others. The juices of kagas, ükha, jatas, kündus, semiltis, tabeymus and taygas are all commonly drunk. Txalza, or soyko "milk" is common in rural areas, and served at thatched buildings called alpas. The infusion of the joysana plant, called joysana itself, is extracted from the leaves of the plant. Another popular infusion is xoyva, brewed from ango leaves. The intoxicating infusion of aqi leaves is called tempapeyka. Soda is served at basically every establishment across the planet. Wines are fermented from ükha, semilti and tayga; soyko wine is called quva. Ghaylva produces a 20% alcoholic drink called marxa. The most popular marxa brands are Kilenxe, Loto's, Azbirma, Portü, Zarita and Tseji. Zbomü is another alcoholic drink, brewed from zdanka and known for its urine-yellow color. Zbomüis 44% alcoholic, and popular brands include Ozdi, Tarayka, Nenvu and Xalülgha. Fermented tsanqa nectar is known as tsoyleyza.

Being the world traders that they are, the Javartis are not content to eat and drink only their own plants, animals and mushrooms. Important fruits include bananas, pineapples, apples, grapes and oranges; imported vegetables include potatoes, tomatoes, beans and onions; other imported plants include coffee, tea, wheat, barley, rice, ba e monu, marijuana, pham, oezha, camoscas, poppies, roses and a plant called nidu. Nidu, found on many planets (the LIE name is from Bodusian), can be made into a curd much like tofu. Potatoes are sometimes substituted for luzdis, whereas nidu is cooked into soft, dalpa-like pieces of food called belayvas. Belayvas can be wrapped around various savory fillings like a taco. A more burrito-like nidu wrap is called a pampa. Pampas are filled with all sorts of fillings, such as eggs, palvu, jinkhu, arvu, alko, azgi, dzosotu, luzdi, garza, zayma and mirgas. A nidu crêpe is called a saypaxü. Popular foreign animals include salmon, shrimp, pigs, sheep, chicken and ducks.

Informal, formal and luxury restaurants are established across Javarti. At many of the luxury restaurants, people can be pedicured while eating, or eat in a hot tub. You may have the opportunity of eating with some sexy women, ilti or non-ilti. (Luxury restaurants with men have been less in demand.) There are also nude restaurants, where everyone eats naked and adult films are shown. Restaurants called ambültas serve mostly breakfast; fast food restaurants serve lots of nidu wraps, tsalba, axilgha and sweets. Bars serve all alcoholic drinks, while at a xoyvelpa you can drink xoyva (and buy snacks). Künghis are the bohemian establishments that specialize in joysana. Candy stores sell candy exclusively, while grocery stores sell all sorts of food. A grocery store has the meat and qasa up front, the vegetables to the back right of the meat, the fruit behind the vegetables, the nuts and snacks at the center, carbohydrates at the very back, seafood and seafood qasa to the back left of the meat, mixed foods behind the seafood and seafood qasa, beverages and drugs behind the nuts and snacks, and non-foods (such as diapers) in front of the nuts and snacks. Because of the way an ilti's brain processes knowledge of food groups, Javartis have an intuitive, inborn understanding of where everything in a grocery store is, and will not get lost in the grocery store. Javartis eat three meals a day. When they eat at home, their entire families join together thrice a day to eat, seated at the large tables in their luxurious rooms. More often though, they are eating out, or some members of the family will be eating out and others will be eating in. At the beginning of each home or formal restaurant meal, a cloth serviette is placed to the left side of the food and used to wipe. At the right is a red, square towel called an orpü, used exclusively for cleaning up spills. Javarti meals start with a drink before each course, and end with a drink. Kitchens, dining rooms and restaurants are equipped not only with froks, knives, spoons and chopsticks, but also siltis. A silti is a long utensil with a dome-shaped end covered with velcro-like spikes that allow food to stick to it. Foods eaten with the silti include ubali, layba, bubu poqa, malmoyvi, nuggets, ülqo, djoysa, banda, omposto, guysi, and belayvas.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Khemehekis »

The perfect article for this thread:

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/w ... taste-like
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by Reyzadren »

Cooking is a not a big thing in my conworld because food is not a necessity. Hence, in most places, kitchens are only as small as toilets, if at all.

However, for those in the subculture scene, teahouses themselves often merge the kitchen and dining area to create a seamless guesting experience. As workers, fire magic users heat up the pot, water users provide the water, and earth users freshen up the tea leaves to be brewed, all in front of visitors for a spectular performance, whether it's a staycation or self-collection.
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by sasasha »

Aretian cuisine largely splits into two halves, the south-eastern redroot sphere and the north-western goldear sphere.

Redroot is something I liked the sound of about seventeen years ago but have never quite decided what it was. I think of it as a cross between carrot, beetroot and sweet potato, but this might be a good opportunity to define its features a little...

I think it is a fairly sweet, fibrous tuber that grows best in wetlands, alluvial plains and waterlogged terraced fields. Large reeds grow out of it, which cannot be eaten but are also harvested, used as building materials, textile ingredients, and made into papyrus-y stuff. It has been bred to have hardy varieties suitable for growth in non-waterlogged soil, though these are less favoured, and generally smaller. Waterlogged varieties are called 'moonroot' or 'moon redroot', dry soil varieties 'sunroot' or 'sun redroot'. The tubers can be fairly long (especially moon redroot) and chaotically formed similar to mandrake roots; the Nicufenki read their fortunes in the shapes of arithmantically selected redroots ritually exposed at certain full moons.

It can be roasted (traditionally in ashes wrapped in its own leaves; the sugars leaking out caramelise onto the inside of the leaves which are eagerly licked by children) and eaten as is, or it can be dried and ground into a pinkish flour. The flour can be baked into flatbreads and cakes, or it can be eaten as a paste mixed with e.g. yoghurt, spiced fruit pastes; anything tasty, really. Redroot boiled in its own sugars, processed with Dulgan tree sap and the leaves of the dragonspice bush produces a gum-like sweet which is very chewy and said to bestow energy (as well as tooth decay).

Redroot is high in protein and fibre. Virtually every meal contains it in some form. There is a tangy taste to it which has to be cooked out enough otherwise it can be bitter, and a distinctive aroma is produced by some varieties while cooking which North Aretians say is unpleasant. It does not grow north of the Aretian Alps. The post-thermal history of southern Aretia is one of boom-and-bust empires seeking to control irrigation systems for redroot production. In Syamomein, the cuisine is based on sunroot varieties. Other savoury crops include various kinds of beans, Salvian barley, and a millet-esque crop. Many fruits are grown including citrine, olive-analogues and grape-analogues. The Aretian goat and Aretian yak graze the uplands providing dairy and meat. Big game are hunted in the forests, rivers are extensively managed and fished, and saltwater fish are particularly important in Nicufenki cuisine, since the Gulf juts a huge distance inland and isn't far from anywhere in Nicufenk.

The north-western goldear crop is wheat-esque and its cuisine has received less thought so far. Goldear and Redroot are harvestable at quite different points in the year, which contributes to perennial hostilities in central Aretia as states along the border between the two cultural spheres wax and wane in resource reserves throughout the year and sequentially raid each other.

Further north still in the Kelsi archipelago the sunbloom produces its distinctive oil-nuts during the long summer, which along with torrents and cascades of berries supplement the diet of yumta (reindeer-ish) meat and cheese, fish, seal and whalemeat which prevails throughout the rest of the year.

A forbidden delicacy is angel (Vashari) eggs. They are believed across Aretia (and the other continents too) to bestow magical powers, either directly or on the child if a mother eats them whilst pregnant. The illicit trade in angel eggs is the cause of 90% of Vashari-human wars. Unfertilised though most eggs may be when the humans steal them, Vashari communities still protect them with their lives. Angel eggs are the size of a human head and contain a greenish translucent jelly-like substance. Eaten raw they are said to send the eater mad. The way they are cooked in Yaro and Ethi black magic is into a fried pudding mixed with animal blood (or the spell-seeker's own...)

A seaweed similar to bladder wrack is eaten as a staple across the west coast of Aretia, which other Aretians consider putrid.

As to kitchens themselves. South Aretian urban architecture is all about the central courtyard, which is where most milling, butchering and large-scale cooking is done. Communal stocks of staple foodstuffs are generally produced in extended family units, courtyard by courtyard. Individual apartments off the central courtyards have their own hearths but they are more for indoor warmth and smaller cooking projects. There's always someone cooking something: elderly family members spend most of their time rooting through pantries and rustling up snacks whilst babysitting. In rural communities the same holds, but the extended family space is generally organised as a compound often in a clearing with separate buildings around a large central area in the centre of which ideally sit a water source and a communal fire.

North-western Aretians generally live in more private houses and have a kitchen per small family unit. The Sèilit have a particularly curious architectural style for their kitchens, at the centre of which is a tall, round iron oven, accessible from all sides, complete with rain collector and many compartments at different temperatures, not unlike an Aga arranged into a tower and fitted with numerous gizmos. These hark back to the Sèilit's nomadic past, when each family would have a carriage containing their family's ancestral oven, which got bigger and more elaborate as time went on (some even doubled as forges). It was with this piece of technology that the Sèilit were able to exploit the harsh northern climate and turn the once remote Urngese plain into an industrial powerhouse.

What the Sèilit actually cook isn't very tasty unless they can afford to import Southern niceties from Jodarn or Western foodstuffs via Bey; all that really grows in Urngas is oats and apples, and the plain does not get the long summer bonus that is a big factor at higher latitudes. They eat tough old horsemeat, tap living animals for blood pudding, and consider old jerky to be good enough to eat no matter how indistinguishable it has got from leather, all of which bothers visitors - but waste not, want not.
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