Cooking and dining!

Discussions about constructed worlds, cultures and any topics related to constructed societies.
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k1234567890y
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by k1234567890y »

Traditionally Ame people would not have a kitchen inside their houses, their kitchens would be in a stall outside of the house. This is because traditional Ame houses are stilt houses made of wood, cooking in the house would posit risks of fire to the house.

Stoves of traditional Ame houses are made of stone, and has a surface for cooking; traditional cookwares of Ame people are made of clay; also cutting utensils were made of stones, especially obsidians, before the 18th century, this is because Ame people did not have metalworking and metalwares were a luxury in Ame society before the 18th century.

For cuisines, farmers of Ame people are mostly vegetarian, the consumption of meat is rare; consumption of fish, however, is more common among Ame fishers and divers. This difference is due to the difference of the physical environment.
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
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elemtilas
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by elemtilas »

Kitchens are interesting! Thanks for bringing them up!

If the Ame keep the kitchen away from the house because of the fire risk, many people in the Eastlands of Yeola at least attach the kitchen to the house, because stone and brick are so commonly used building materials.

In the cities, most Werrefolk rarely have kitchens, because they rarely have sufficiently large gardens or farms right outside their door to warrant. There might be a small room with a cupboard and table and possibly a sink where boughten foods can be stored and eaten. But they'll do very little actual cooking here. Food stalls and quickfood mongers are the go to.

A large and well to do house, such as the Werreish nobility or most of the ancient houses of the Denê, whether in the city or in the country, will have a proper set of kitchens, and this layout has travelled with the Denê as they came out of the Uttermost West.

Kitchens comprise a suite of separate rooms. A dirty kitchen is where meats are butchered, cleaned, skinned / plucked, dressed and pre-processed. The clean kitchen is where dry goods, such as nuts, fruits, vegetables, fungi and the little grain that Denê actually eat are processed. Both of these parts will have a sink as well as cupboards for tools and cutting boards and so forth. Attached to the dirty kitchen is the smoke house and the woodhouse. The clean kitchen is usually very close to the larder and the pantry. The larder is where prepared foods (cheeses, breads, nut butters, actual butter and so forth are stored; the pantry is where ingredients (flour, nuts, vegetables, etc) are kept. Attached to the clean kitchen is the great oven. Various breads and pastries are baked here.

The dirty and clean kitchens, as well as the larder and pantry, all open into the hearthplace. This is what most Americans or Europeans would call a "kitchen". Here is the hearth and the lesser ovens, various preparation tables, cupboards for tools, hooks for pots and pans.

In the Eastlands, charcoal is often the fuel of choice, though gas is a viable option. Some Denê have experimented with a kind of thaumic oven where a kind of fan rains down highly excited destillate of thaumium while another fan rains up particular spirits of Elektra City. Thus far, the results have been less than stellar, with soggy, poorly cooked food being a common result. That sometimes the food gets up and runs away after being cooked has not gone unnoticed.
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k1234567890y
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Re: Cooking and dining!

Post by k1234567890y »

nice elemtilas (:

some supplement for traditional cooking in Ame culture: there are cases where they put stoves inside the house(some traditional Ame homes are built on water), but usually the stove is put outside of the house when it is possible, especially when a dry land is available.

For Ame cuisine: traditionally Ame people eat porridges made of rice and wheat, some forms of breads, noodles and cakes made of wheat and buckwheat also exist; also, before modern era, Ame people rarely ate raw food, usually they cooked the food before eating.
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
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