Flowering Fields - Snapshots from Rireinu

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eldin raigmore
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Re: Flowering Fields - Snapshots from Rireinu

Post by eldin raigmore »

“you” wrote: In Vanasova, the birthplace of pole dancing, the suit of wands is replaced by the suit of dancing poles (taño).
What does the suit of poles look like?
Also, do you have a story about pole-dancing?
If it originated sort of how it did IRL, it started as an athletic sport, then became a circus act, before becoming erotic; and it is still an athletic sport and a circus act.
I’m not going to ask you for any pictures.
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prettydragoon
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Re: Flowering Fields - Snapshots from Rireinu

Post by prettydragoon »

eldin raigmore wrote: 12 Dec 2021 17:57
“you” wrote: In Vanasova, the birthplace of pole dancing, the suit of wands is replaced by the suit of dancing poles (taño).
What does the suit of poles look like?
The suit of poles is much like the suit of batons (bastoni) in Italian-suited cards. The poles are depicted as straight batons or poles that cross each other (except obviously on the ace of poles).
Also, do you have a story about pole-dancing?
Not so much a story as such, more of a description of the sport. I can say it started rather differently from the Human sport of the same name.

Pole Dancing: Beauty and Grace
The number one sport in Rireinu is the traditional martial art, tañoyora. It is very similar to quarterstaff with a steel pipe. It has a thousand years of tradition behind it. Children learn it in school. Cities close down for championship games. Professional practitioners are very highly regarded; more than one champion has parlayed her popularity into a successful political career. No major gathering is complete without a tañoyora demonstration.

Unfortunately, the literal translation of its name, tañoyora, is 'pole dancing'. This seems to give weird ideas to most galactics.

Brief Description

The goal of pole dancing is to teach the student self-discipline. This is achieved through learning to wield the dancing pole in a graceful and efficient manner.

The taño, or dancing pole, is a length of steel pipe 134 cm long and 25mm/19mm in diameter. It is used to strike your opponent in one of the legal target zones or to disarm her. Before you will be allowed to practise full speed with a partner, you must master the basic saya and demonstrate to the satisfaction of the herenari that you are not a danger to yourself or to others.

The ring is packed earth, marked with a 4 m diameter circle. Where packed earth is impracticable, such as on board a spaceship or in a convention centre, thin mats of approximately similar softness are used instead.

The scoring system in pole dancing is perfectly straightforward:
Clean strike on your opponent's body in a legal target zone: 1 point.
Forcing your opponent out of the ring: 1 point.
Forcing your opponent to the ground (touching the ground at three points or more): 3 points.
Disarming your opponent: 10 points, or victory.

In a competition, the athletes will wear an either red or white headband.

History

In the year 1721ye. Remesena, an ascetic living in the forest near the city of Vanasova, developed the art of pole dancing after defeating a band of brigands with her walking staff. The last brigand managed to cut Remesena's staff in half with her sword, but Remesena smashed her skull between the two halves of her staff. Looking for a replacement staff that wouldn't be as easy to break, Remesena thought of her sister who owned a steel rolling mill in the city.

With a sample pole from her sister's stock the length of her old walking staff, Remesena then invented the art of tañoyora or pole dancing, as an aid to self-discipline and incidentally also an efficient form of self-defense. Ever since her death in 1779ye., Remesena herenari is venerated in Vanasova as Tañoyorano Hase, the goddess or patron saint of pole dancing.

The Home of Pole Dancing

Temple of Remesena, the inventor of pole dancing. Vanasova, Vanasova Province. Attached to the temple is the worlds' leading pole dancing school or sari. The students and masters lead a monastic lifestyle; appropriate for a martial art invented by an ascetic. Visitors may watch students sparring every day. On most anopayu (Sundays), there is a demonstration match by the masters. The eraemo of Remesenasari is Ruvohase herenari (since 2751ye.). Some other notable masters: Uterinu herenari, Sekepura herenari.

Safety Record

Pole dancing is perfectly safe. Well, mostly. Most years, there's no more than four or five deaths in the pole dancing ring. Usually novices killing each other. But back in 2712ye., so about 50 years ago, there was a famous incident. It was in the Teroyire Provincial Championships finals, Hahatiñu had just pulled a flawless Sleeping Crane, and Keriñana tried to counter with a Double Butterfly. But she lost her balance, fell straight on Hahatiñu with her dancing pole level forward, crushed her windpipe and broke her neck.
eldin raigmore wrote:I’m not going to ask you for any pictures.
Then I won't tell you there are two infographics, one that is Safe For Work (at least, assuming that surfing random websites at work can be) and one that isn't.
https://www.deviantart.com/prettydragoo ... -681480925 This one has the stylized Rireinukave figures censored below the neck.
https://www.deviantart.com/prettydragoo ... -675316721 This one is the exact same infographic but uncensored.
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eldin raigmore
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Re: Flowering Fields - Snapshots from Rireinu

Post by eldin raigmore »

Thank you for not telling me where to see the infographics!
I found the SFW one informative.
Deviantart won’t let me see the NSFW one unless I log in to prove my age.
I can’t log in to Deviantart as far as I know.
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prettydragoon
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Re: Flowering Fields - Snapshots from Rireinu

Post by prettydragoon »

eldin raigmore wrote: 14 Dec 2021 04:48 Thank you for not telling me where to see the infographics!
You're very welcome! I'm glad you found the infographic that you could access informative.

If it is any consolation, you didn't really miss anything. When a figure is 170 pixels tall, there isn't much space for salacious detail. Or any other kind of detail either.

Deviantart have their rules about mature content, and well, they are rules. That they have. Which is why I do try to provide SFW versions of all of my art (or "art") that I post there.
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prettydragoon
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Re: Flowering Fields - Snapshots from Rireinu

Post by prettydragoon »

A traditional type of performing arts

This was originally posted on CWS as part of CoWriMo, a month-long exercise for writing in conlangs. Thus the writing prompt and word count. And the actual text in Rireinutire, together with IPA and gloss.

Prompt: Do you have a traditional type of performing arts in your concountry? Describe it!
Word count: 116 words
Human: 153 words
Tl;dr: Too traditional to make sense, so it must be good.
Spoiler:
Rireinuno risehopu netikiremu [eiha]pa imekave: siki ii netihino seru yakave: eiha ku mete to risehomu to nenimu ukave hii hiye yakavo hii miku vera ii neataromu huhura sati votota opekavo::

netiya kaki soyopope to yutomu to peñakarumu ukave saki ñisa yonekave hii huno seye yoku yakayo~ au hase au nohu· au saña au yite: to ñeki netiya huno mimisopa ii seyeserura tosopukave· site iña iñakañohipe yakaseve hii eihanetisoha kakumu [vayuhinesipoya]mu neakave saku [vaka kana seho]no mumopa moyi kana yakahuve::

piki muva kaki netikaru yakave sakimu kaku netireñi kaneñuta soakave sakumu koñekuropa yutoñi [neikenopo]na neusano semi yakave: tire hipu Harutirepa yakave· site vahu soti aputa· meyoro romaña keñutañi: neataromu kaki ake apureyekave saki netisono ii piyura votokave::

IPA:
ɹiɹeinuno ɹisehopu netikiɹemu eihɑpɑ imekɑve ||
siki ii netihino seɹu jɑkɑve ||
eihɑ ku mete to ɹisehomu to nenimu ukɑve hii hije jɑkɑvo hii miku veɹɑ ii neɑtɑɹomu huhuɹɑ sɑti vototɑ opekɑvo ||
netijɑ kɑki sojopope to jutomu to peŋɑkɑɹumu ukɑve sɑki ŋisɑ jonekɑve hii huno seje joku jɑkɑjo || ɑu hɑse ɑu nohu | ɑu sɑŋɑ ɑu jite ||
to ŋeki netijɑ huno mimisopɑ ii sejeseɹuɹɑ tosopukɑve | site iŋɑ iŋɑkɑŋohipe jɑkɑseve hii eihɑnetisohɑ kɑkumu vɑjuhinesipojɑmu neɑkɑve sɑku vɑkɑ kɑnɑ sehono mumopɑ moji kɑnɑ jɑkɑhuve ||
piki muvɑ kɑki netikɑɹu jɑkɑve sɑkimu kɑku netiɹeŋi kɑneŋutɑ soɑkɑve sɑkumu koŋekuɹopɑ jutoŋi neikenoponɑ neusɑno semi jɑkɑve ||
tiɹe hipu Hɑɹutiɹepɑ jɑkɑve | site vɑhu soti ɑputɑ | mejoɹo ɹomɑŋɑ keŋutɑŋi ||
neɑtɑɹomu kɑki ɑke ɑpuɹejekɑve sɑki netisono ii pijuɹɑ votokɑve ||

Gloss:
Rireinu-GEN traditional perform-art-ACC eiha-ESS name-PRS-HSY ||
this.NOM one theatre-GEN kind.NOM be-PRS-HSY ||
eiha.NOM so many and tradition-ACC and convention-ACC have-PRS-HSY that.CONJ wonder.NOM be-PRS-INFR that.CONJ somebody.NOM even one performance-ACC end-INE as.far.as sit-INF endure-PRS-INFR ||
actor.NOM which.REL elaborate and body.paint-ACC and headdress-ACC have-PRS-HSY that.NOM immediately.ADV indicate-PRS-HSY that.CONJ ones.own character.NOM who.Q be-PRS-Q || xor goddess.NOM xor demon.NOM | xor hero.NOM xor villain.NOM ||
also each actor.NOM ones.own career-ESS one character-type-INE specialise-PRS-HSY | thus not unusual be-PRS-NEG-HSY that.CONJ eiha-stage-ADE who.REL-ACC warrior-princess-ACC see-PRS-HSY that.one.NOM wise old hermit-GEN grandmother-ESS enough old be-PRS-SBJV-HSY ||
narrow number.NOM which.REL play-item.NOM be-PRS-HSY that-ACC who.REL stagehand.NOM manipulate-INF may-PRS-HSY that.one-ACC all-black-ESS body.paint-PPP invisible-PTV seem-NMZ-GEN for be-PRS-HSY ||
language.NOM ancient Haru-language-ESS be-PRS-HSY | thus very difficult follow-INF | often song-COM interrupt-PPP ||
performance-ACC which.REL orchestra.NOM accompany-PRS-HSY that.NOM stage-GEN one corner-INE sit-PRS-HSY ||
Translation in Human:
The traditional performing art of Rireinu is called eiha. It is a form of theatre. Eiha has so many traditions and conventions that it is a wonder that anybody can stand to sit through even one performance.

The actors have elaborate face and body paint and headdresses that show immediately who or what the character is: god or demon, hero or villain. Also, each actor specialises in one type of character in her career, so it is not unusual to see on the eiha stage a "warrior princess" old enough to be the grandmother of the "wise old hermit".

There is a limited number of props that may be manipulated by stagehands, who are painted all in black to make them "invisible". The dialogue is in ancient Harutire, making it very difficult to follow, often interrupted by songs. The performance is accompanied by an orchestra that sits in one corner of the stage.
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