Uhoq Vernissage

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Allekanger
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Uhoq Vernissage

Post by Allekanger »

UHOQ VERNISSAGE

Hello! This thread will be about my imagined conworld and all that comes with it. The focus of the conworld is a territory called Uhoq inhabited by the Ivook people. I mean to share my ideas for this conworld regarding geography, history, culture, language etc. Life in Uhoq is based on life on Earth, but it is set in a fictional world. However, some real world elements occur, e.g. mathematical notation and binominal nomenclature.

Since last Lexember, which was very helpful for developing the Ivook language, I've been inspired to share what I come up with with other conarti... condesigners. I've begun to see this as an artform that happens to fit me. As a landscape architect I like to work with both digital illustrations and handmade drawings to present design proposals and I suspect this will shine through also when presenting in this thread.

I hope you'll all enjoy this exhibition and feel free to leave comments if you'd like!
Last edited by Allekanger on 22 Apr 2020 20:35, edited 5 times in total.

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Uhoq: Introduction

Post by Allekanger »

INTRODUCTION

Uhoq (HNUOKHID hanuiokvaid) is a territory located on the eastern coast of a larger northern hemisphere continent and has a humid continental climate. It is bordered by the Soiad Sea (SOQDLU soiadlu) to the east, the Kusun Bay (KUSUNLU kusunlu) to the south and by the large Nalaig Lake (NLIGNIUB nalaignaiub) to the west, as well as by neighbouring countries in the southwest and in the north. The English name of the territory comes from the Ivook name, which roughly translates as 'our land of water skies'. It's short Ivook form is UOK uiok.

Spoiler:
Image
Map of Uhoq (Ivook version) with subregions and cities marked.


Spoiler:
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Map of Uhoq (romanized version) with subregions and cities marked.

The population of Uhoq reaches about 1.6 million people. Roughly one million of the inhabitants of Uhoq live in one of the three largest cities: Nuhsu (NUHSU nuhsu), Sokeiag (SOKEQG sokeiag) and Sosaiak (SOSQK sosaiak). Nuhsu is the the capital of Uhoq, but Sokeiag is the largest city in terms of inhabitants. Uhoq is divided into ten regions of public administration.
Last edited by Allekanger on 30 Apr 2020 14:53, edited 7 times in total.

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Uhoq: Language

Post by Allekanger »

LANGUAGE

The language of Uhoq is called Ivook (IHUKMUB ivukmub) and is a language isolate not related to any neighbouring languages. The standardized Ivook language is based on the Auk dialect (QHUKMUB aukmub), spoken by a majority of the Ivook people. The standard language has around 1.1 million speakers, of whom almost all reside in Uhoq, where it is spoken natively. The remaining 0.5 million inhabitants of Uhoq speak one of the other four major dialects natively, but are able to converse in the standard language as well.


Sounds and syllable composition
The syllable structure in Ivook is (C)V(C), with C being a consonant and V a vowel. Stress is non-phonemic. The phonemic inventory of the Auk dialect is shown below:

Image


1 /ŋ/ only occurs after /a/ and /o/.
2 /s/ has an allophone [ɕ] near /i/ and after /ai/.
3 /j/ only occurs between vowels.
4 /h/ varies between [h] and [x], and is [ʍ] near /u/.
5 /h/ and /v/ occur in near complementary distribution.
6 /v/ is /w/ in some instances near /u/.
7 Vowels /e o/ are mid [e̞ o̞].



Basic grammar bits
Ivook word order is SOV. Ivook is generally ERG-ABS in its alignment(?), where nouns in the absolutive is unmarked, and nouns in the ergative takes the ending -ai or -bai (after vowels). There is also a oblique case ending in -i or -(i)a. The same endings also apply to verbs and adjectives (which are verbs in Ivook), where -ai or -bai (after vowels) marks a coming subclause and -i or -(i)a gives the verb an attributive function.


Dialects
The Ivook language consists of five dialects. The previously mentioned Auk dialect has the most amount of speakers and together with the Sive (SHEMUB sivemub) and Nalaig (NLIGMUB nalaigmub) dialects it makes up the West Ivook dialects. The East Ivook group covers the Samid (SMDMUB samidmub) and Sekid (SEKDMUB sekidmub) dialects. There was also a third group, Nomad Ivook (CKBEMUB tsakbemub), that became extinct during the Middle Ivook period.


Image


While East Ivook preserved most of the sounds of Old Ivook, the West dialects diverged with palatalizations of /t k/ near /i/ and a vowel dance, where Old Ivook /u/ merged with /i/ and Ivook /o au/ became West Ivook /o u/. The present Samid dialect is considered the most conservative, but stands out in that it changed fricatives Old Ivook /s ɬ/ into /h s/ respectively. Little to nothing is known about Nomad Ivook, since there are no written records, but it is thought to have catalyzed the umlauting of some instances of /a/ to /o/ in Nalaig Ivook. Maps of the development of the Ivook language are found below:

Spoiler:
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Old Ivook emerged in the southwest part of the country about 1000 years ago, splitting up from Nomad Ivook. Old Ivook then branched out into West Ivook and East Ivook.


Image

Sekid pastoralists moved north into the highlands pushing Nomad Ivook hunter-gatherers to retreat even further north. West Ivook Sive farmers culture deepened and they expanded their territory northward along the shores of the Nalaig Lake, while West Ivook Auk speakers gained grounds around the Ketuwan River.


Image

Auk Ivook speakers migrated east during the Silver House Period and settled along the coast. The hunter-gatherers of the region were quickly absorbed into the newly established rule and Nomad Ivook went extinct in just a few generations. In the northwest the hunter-gatherers mixed with Sive Ivook speaking people and the Nalaig dialect started to emerge. The isolation of the northwestern shores during the Foreign Annexation further fueled the divergence of the Nalaig dialect from the other two West Ivook dialects.


Image

The five major dialects of the modern Ivook language. The Auk dialect is the basis of the standard Ivook language.
Last edited by Allekanger on 09 Apr 2020 22:13, edited 5 times in total.

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Uhoq: Writing

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WRITING

The writing system used in Uhoq to write the Ivook language is an (impure) abjad consisting of 16 different characters. It's Ivook name is HNUHOD hinuvod. This is an overview of its conhistory and development until modern times, sort of reflecting my actual design process for the script and the evolution of the language of the past few months. The characters are represented with smaller sized bold capital letters in running text (QHUKMUB) followed by a romanization in italics (ivukmub), as there is no font for the abjad to be typed on computers.


Old Ivook abjad
In its early days the abjad was used for schamanistic verses as well as messages on wooden slips, but the number of people with knowledge of the abjad was low. The script was written either horisontally or vertically, but mostly from upper left to lower right.

Image

The twelve characters of the Old Ivook abjad represented eleven consonant sounds /m n p b t d k g s j ɬ/ and two plain vowels /e o/ and two dipthongs /ai au/. Vowels /i a u/ were not marked, but instead included in the consonant characters. The consonant characters (M S H Q N T K L) therefore represent CV syllables with a consonant and optionally one of vowels /a i u/, while adding a vowel character (E O I U) would replace the inherent vowel sound of the previous character with one of /e o ai au/. Characters H T K represented both voiceless /p t k/ and voiced /b d g/.


Middle Ivook abjad
During the Middle Ivook period the design of the characters developed and the characters were ordered into three groups roughly based on their sound qualities. The last group is made up by the vowel characters. The writing direction was established as a mix of horisontal and vertical, where individual words were written in columns forming rows of sentences from left to right, top to bottom. A diacritic in the shape of a dot was used on characters H T K to represent voiced sounds /b d g/.

Image

Sound changes not indicated in the abjad was the West Ivook change from /p/ to /f/ and the following complimentary distribution of the allophones of the new sound (voiceless [f] word initially and finally and voiced [v] word medially). Close vowel /u/ merged with /i/ and mid vowel /o/ heightened to [u.]. Diphthong /au/ was monophthongized to [o]. Sequences /ti/ and /ki/ became /tɕi/ and voiced /di/ and /gi/ became /i/.


Saiah Ivook abjad
After the Foreign Annexation the abjad was revised during the Saiah period, due to both phonological changes and a greater need for consonant predictability, as an increasing amount of people learned to read during this period. The Saiah Ivook abjad saw the introduction of the four new characters C D G B, representing /tɕ d g b/ respectively. The dotted versions of characters H T K were thus no longer used.

Image

Character C was created to write the new phoneme /tɕ/, having emerged from palatalized /t k/. Other phonological changes during this period inlcude fricative /f/ being debuccalized to [h] (except near /u/ where it remained [f]), while remaining voiced [v] inside words. The Saiah Ivook abjad is the current writing system of the Ivook language.


Sample text: The whale and the seal
Below is a short story of a whale that falls in love with a seal, but gets heartbroken. It's meant to show what Hinuvod writing looks like. There is both a digitally made version and a handwritten one.

Image

Digital version of the story 'The whale and the seal'.

Spoiler:

Image
Handwritten version of the story 'The whale and the seal'.

Below is a romanized version of the sample text and a translation:
Spoiler:
NU K SUHG
NUBI GO KQUD QTE HQUB TQK
SUHG KM EQGQ KUBSQ
NUBI NLQ CNO SUHGQ
NUBI MUBEK SUHGQ C LHE UCI NELI
SMET KE Q NHQ HSU KQE Q LKU TENQ SUHGIQ CHNQ MEL S
SUHGI HSU KQE HOQ QTE Q LKU QBOKQ QHQ DO S


nu ka suwag
nubai go kiud ite hiub taiak
suwag kam eiagi kubasa
nubai nali tsano suwagi
nubai mubek suwagi: 'tsa lave utsai nelai
simet ke a nava hasu kie a laku teni suwagaia tsihna mel sa'
suwagai hasu kie hoia ite a laku iboka ava do sa


The whale and the seal
The whale was swimming around the islands looking for fish
A seal was resting on the cliffs
The whale saw the seal and fell in love
The whale said to the seal: 'if we can't be together,
Take my heart and hide it somewhere only you will know'
The seal took the heart and swam up a river and hid it in the dark depths of the forest
Last edited by Allekanger on 04 Apr 2020 14:40, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Uhoq Vernissage

Post by Aszev »

I enjoyed reading this presentation. It's well-structured and your images are pleasing to look at. It was a good selection of information for an initial presentation, I find. I look forward to seeing more [:)]

To what era of Earth's would Uhoq's present day compare, technology and quality of life-wise? How big is Uhoq geographically?
Allekanger wrote:
28 Mar 2020 17:03
Map of Uhoq with subregions and cities marked.
I would suggest adding the relative positions of the major cities when you mention them below.
Allekanger wrote:LANGUAGE
I like the look of your language. The phonology feels simple with suitable quirks to go with it; I especially like the variation between /h/ and /v/.

Has the Auk dialect spread from a western core area? It looks like it has spread eastwards to previously non-Ivook speaking areas. The shape of its distribution reminds me of Mandarin Chinese in relation to the other Chinese languages.

Where was Nomad Ivook spoken? A possible suggestion could be to add a dotted are on the map to show it.
Allekanger wrote:WRITING
I like the look of your script, and I enjoyed reading about its development. It reminds me of the Inuktitut script, but more internally consistent in its design, or however I should express that. The division of the letters into sections of four reminds me of the Futhark; might that have been an inspiration?
Allekanger wrote:The writing direction was established as a mix of horisontal and vertical, where individual words were written in columns forming rows of sentences from left to right, top to bottom.
Is there any real-world prescedent for this?

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Re: Uhoq Vernissage

Post by Allekanger »

Thank you! I'm glad you enjoyed it! And you've provided very helpful critique!

I apparently did not remember to include a romanized version of the map, but there is one now, so hopefully it'll be easier to follow the navigation in the text. The world in which Uhoq exists is paralleled with our real world in terms of technological development. Quality of life I'd say is good in the Uhoq region, with modern infrastructure and today's means of communications. However, there are remote rural villages that don't enjoy the same standard as densely settled areas. I think I'll get in more on this in the history part that is soon to come.

I have updated and added maps in the language section that show the development of the language. The Auk dialect really did spread from a Western core, somewhere between Nuhsu and Sokeiag. You have a keen eye! The Nomad Ivook speakers were immersed into the Auk dialect as technology and education spread eastward throughout the country during the Silver Kingdom period.

The total area of Uhoq I estimate to be about 65 000 sq km. It's roughly the size of Lithuania. The distance from Sokeiag to Nuhsu is approximately 70 km, and the distance between Nuhsu and Sosaiak is about 240 km.
Aszev wrote:
02 Apr 2020 22:09
I like the look of your script, and I enjoyed reading about its development. It reminds me of the Inuktitut script, but more internally consistent in its design, or however I should express that. The division of the letters into sections of four reminds me of the Futhark; might that have been an inspiration?
Thank you! Having a native script for the language was important to me, since I enjoy writing. Inuktitut script is very dear to me, but it wasn't a primary source of inspiration for Ivook, I think. The Thai script functioned as a trampoline for the aesthetics of the Ivook script, but the abjad has evolved a bit beyond its "Thai roots". Futhark, however, must've played a role in dividing the characters into groups, but I think the idea of basing the groups on sounds come from a lot of South East Asian Brahmic descended scripts. The rows and columns were a conscious design move on my side, because I didn't want to bother with punctuation marks (I just thought it looked cluttered all the time). I don't know of any natural language that does this though.
Last edited by Allekanger on 30 Apr 2020 14:38, edited 1 time in total.

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Uhoq: Climate and Vegetation

Post by Allekanger »

CLIMATE AND VEGETATION

Uhoq lies approximately between the 50th-54th parallels north and has a temperate climate with regional differences in precipitation. Most of the country enjoys warm summers and cold winters ("Dwb") and slightly more precipitation in summer than in winter, but the east coast receives more rain due to the heavy seasonal monsoons in pushing against the mountains along the coast. The vegetation cover somewhat mirrors the amount of precipitation with thicker forests in the east and less tree cover in the interior. However, the relatively sparse tree cover of the interior is also due to the landscape having been kept open by grazing animals.


Spoiler:
Image
Map of Uhoq showing mean annual precipitation with lightest blue being about 700 mm a year and darkest blue slightly over 1200 mm a year.


Spoiler:
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Map of Uhoq showing vegetation cover with lightest greens indicating farmland or grasslands, medium greens broadleaf dominated forests and darkest green conifer dominated forests. Bluegreen shows the extent of the temperate rainforest along the east coast.
Last edited by Allekanger on 22 Apr 2020 20:33, edited 1 time in total.

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Uhoq: Landscape and Places

Post by Allekanger »

LANDSCAPE AND PLACES

The Uhok landscape differs throughout the country, spanning from open marshes and grasslands to forested mountains and intimate dells and groves. A large part of the country has long been under the impact of humans, from early hunter-gatherer groups to husbandry and farming to modern urban lifestyles. Most Ivook today live in urban settlements, but the nomadic lifestyles, especially that of herding and transhumance, are upheld still and it is common to send children and teenagers to spend weeks or months at a time together with Ivook elders and wise ones to learn about the traditional way of living in different areas. Ivook folklore talks about certain landscape elements as being the earthly homes of the spirits of nature. Examples are eye-catching geological formations, old forests or big trees and secluded lakes. Some of these commonly known areas and places, as well as some cities, are presented below.


Spoiler:
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Map of Uhoq (Ivook version) with various landscapes and places marked.


Spoiler:
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Map of Uhoq (romanized version) with various landscapes and places marked.



Nalaig Lake (M)
NLIGNQUB nalaignaiub

The Nalaig Lake is considered the mother of waters among the Ivook and it is the place where humans first appeared in the world, when they walked out of the water and onto land, according to Ivook creation story. Biologically this freshwater lake is home to many species of fish, of which many are endemic to the Nalaig Lake. Seals and otters are among the mammals inhabiting the lake, accompanied by many pelagic species of birds. The lake is bordered by several countries and it is an important waterway for trade among the peoples in the region as well as a source of food.


Sive Orchards (N)
SHEQ HNSUBN siveia hansubin
Image

The town of Sive is the oldest city in Uhok and started out as a trading post along the banks of the Sihmo River. Strategically situated on the trading route between the Nalaig Lake and the Kusun Bay, the city saw its golden era during the silver rush in the Himubauk Period when silver was shipped from the Tahmong Mines to the Nalaig Lake region. Merchants invested in theaters and public baths, and particularly in public gardens and orchards with various fruits and berries. The mild climate of the region made fruit trees thrive with species such as cherries, apples, apricots and pears. The berries of the gardens include raspberries, currants, strawberries and grapes. The orchards became popular among the locals as places of recreation as well as for harvesting food. The fruits and berries were also given as gifts to the spirits at shrines. Today the orchards are a popular tourist attraction and together with the preserved old town they make up the identity of Sive.


Bendil Lowlands and Sekid Grasslands
BENDLHID bendilvaid, SEKDMUKL sekidmukil

These two areas represent two different ways of using the land agriculturally. The Bendil Lowlands, with its clay dominated soils and two big rivers flowing through it, is suitable for farming and the fields are used to grow grains (oat and buckwheat) and various vegetables (legumes, roots, bulbs, cabbages etc.). The Sekid Grasslands, with its dryer till soils, hosts instead fields of grasses, herbs and shrubs, which are grazed by herds of livestock. Rather than growing crops, food production centers around dairy products and meat, which are sold to other parts of the country. The Sekid Grassland has a high biodiversity regarding herbs and insects, due to the widespread use of meadows and pastures.


Tangis Wetlands
TINSNM tangisnim

Image

The Tangis Wetlands consists of salt water marshes and seasonally flooded meadows, making them an important habitat for many species of birds, amphibians and insects. During spring the wetlands are a busy stop for many migrating birds on their way to nesting grounds further north. The Tsakbe people used to harvest shellfish in the wetlands and put out nets to catch fish.


Sokeiag (H)
SOKEQG sokeiag

Sokeiag is Uhok's largest city with about 450 000 inhabitants. It started out as an industrial town in the Annexation Period and quickly grew in size as more people came looking for work in the factories. The new port made large scale fishing and shipping goods between continents easier. The city fared quite well compared to other parts of the country during the economic crisis that marked the end of the Annexation Period. Many people in the city today still work in factories, but wages are low and maintenance of the city has been neglected or unprioritized for many decades. Living costs are also lower because of lower standard in residential areas. Crime rates above national average has so far been avoided, but continued neglect of social perspectives is deemed likely to increase chances of people ending up in poverty and possibly criminal activities or drug use. Despite its rather gloomy future, the city has spent a lot of efforts on making health, recreational activities and sports accessible to its residents. Several arenas have been built with the help of state funding and several internationally successful athletes originate from Sokeiag.


Aitmos Cliffs (L)
ITMOSDEM aitmosdem

Image

The Aitmos Cliffs are limestone rocks stretching along the eastern shores of the Nalaig Lake. The rocks are about 30-40 m tall in average, but some cliffs are up to 120 m tall. The cliffs are home to colonies of seabirds having made their home in the fresh water environment of lake. The lime stone has abraded in many places and left caves, cracks and rock sculptures along the shores. The caves are thought to be the entrances to the underworld inhabited by the lizard-like lah spirits (LH lah).


Tedok Hills
TEDOKTU tedoktu

The Tedok Hills are a smaller mountain range separating the Bendil Fields from the Nalaig Lake. Its name means 'red rock', which refers to the red granite making up parts of the bedrock in the area. The hills average about 350 m above sea level, with the highest point being 631 m above sea level. The hills were the main source of wood for the lowland cities of Uhok and were frequented as hunting grounds by the residents of the region. The mountains escaped the logging rush during the Annexation period due to regional laws protecting the hills from industrial harvesting techniques. The Tedok Moutains are, along with the forested areas along Uhok's southwest border, home to the country's only population of wolves, which have been pushed out of other areas in Uhok due to competition with humans and tigers. Other animals common to the Tedok Hills are boars, moose, hares, foxes and deer.


Nuhsu (Q)
NUHSU nuhsu

Image

Nuhsu is located on the banks of the Ketuwan River and it is the capital of Uhok. It has been the seat of different form of governments since its founding during the Old Ivook Period. Located on the fruitful Bendil Lowlands, the agriculture supported the city's establishment as a local ruling power. Although its growth took off economically during this time, it could not compete with the city of Sive, which held the golden trading position on the Sihmo River. Nuhsu was and remained, however, an important center of art and philosophy and many buildings dedicated to different styles of art, music and culture called igelko (QGELKO igelko) are still active to this day. Several art and music schools serve the community and the city is home to many globally appreciated artists, authors and musicians. The city has been spared from devastating fires and many old shrines, temples and gardens date back from its founding days. The city plan has streets bordered with rows of trees in straight lines branching out from the center, but with quite irregular blocks structures in between these main avenues. The city's population numbers about 300 000 inhabitants.


Osaim Woods
OSIMQBOK osaimibok

The Osaim Woods are a large area of forest covered land dominated by deciduos trees typical of mild temperate climates, such as oak, ash and beech. The forest was once grazed by herds of livestock, but was abandoned when the fishing industry became more profitable. The abandonment resulted in a partially layered forest depending on the dominants tree species. Some areas have a mixed tree flora, while others are pure beech forest, with little other vegetation due to the dense canopy. Trees, in Ivook beliefs, are home to the many of the spirits in the world and are considered sacred. They play an important role in Ivook legends and young Ivook are often given a pendant made from the tree associated with the person's inner spirit or personality as a rite of passage into adulthood. The Osaim Woods are thought to be the home of Unaiak (UNQK unaiak), the great boar-like forest spirit who is the guardian of the forests and plants new trees and herbs.


Tsom Flooded Shrines (T)
COMBUNOG tsombunog

Image

The Tsom Flooded Shrines is made up of many stepping stones laid out in the water and stone pillars erected close together at a wading spot in the Ketuwan River as a passage way for people and kelim spirits (KELM kelim) wanting to cross the river. By letting the spirits use the pillars to cross, the local Ivook asked for a safe crossing for themselves as well when using the stepping stones near the water. The Tsom Flooded Shrines partially dry up in early summer making for an easier crossing. The shrine also has altars on each side of the river where travelers can place gifts and receive what others have placed before them, often various forms of food. Wayside shrines with altars like the Tsom are common along frequently used routes between villages or sacred places.


Ludmang Space Range (K)
LUDMINQ QKOKLNK ludmangi akoklanak

Image

The Ludmang Space Range is an international space center and rocket launch range. The space range is a collaboration between universities and institutes in the cities of Nuhsu and Sosaiak as well as space agencies abroad. The space range launches satellites and high-altitude balloons for measurements of the Earth's atmosphere and rockets studying the moon. While Earth is home to the Earthworld (HNID hanaid), the Moon is believed by the Ivook to be the location of the Otherworld (LHU lau), where small, mischievous creatures (KMOS kimos) and monsters dwell. Love is also said to come from the moon and weddings usually take place during full moon. New scientific findings from the moon are frequently presented on national television broadcasts to eager viewers wanting to know more about this distant world (and hopefully catch a glimpse of a monster). People today use the word LHU lau to refer to the Otherworld, and the dialectal (and now standard) word LBU labu to refer to the Moon as a celestial body. The Ludmang Space Range is only used for unmanned launches.


Sidmavak and Taimuwek Mountains
SDMHKTO sidmavakto, TIMUHEKTO taimuwekto

The Sidmavak and Taimuwek Mountains are often told to be opposites, with the Taimuwek range being the places where water arrives on land through heavy rainstorms, while the Sidmavak range, with its many hot springs, is where water returns to the sky. The mountains blocks the rain clouds coming in from the east and casts a rain shadow over much of the Sekid Grasslands, creating the drier area more suitable for grasses, herbs and shrubs, rather than forests. The clouds and mist around the mountains are said to be the home of Samog (SMOG samog), a hare-like spirit that brings the snow in winter by scattering fur from its body all over the land. The Taimuwek Mountains includes the highest point above sea level in Uhok at about 870 m.


Saiah Lake
SQHNQUB saiahnaiub

The Saiah Lake is a rift lake located between the Sidmavak and Taimuwek Mountains. It is the main water source of the Ketuwan River (KETUHNMO ketuwanmo) and is a much appreciated fishing spots, both for locals and tourists. Whitefish and trouts are common in the lake. The lake is surrounded by grazed pastures and small villages near the shores. The inhabitants along the lake practice a form of transhumance, in which summers are spent by herders and their herds on higher altitudes, while returning the the lakeside in winter. The Ivook believe that a fallen star has been hidden in the Saiah Lake by Oias (OQS oias), a blackbird-like spirit that reveals the stars at night through its transparent wings. Oias hid the star to protect it from the kimos of the Moon.


Tahmong Mines (S)
THMONKOSN tahmongkosin

The Tahmong Mines were a source of silver during the Himubauk Period. The silver was initially brought to the capital by horseback, but after seemingly endless attacks and robberies of the caravans, the silver was eventually shipped by boat up the Ketuwan River. The silver was considered to be of excellent quality and was used to make jewellery and dinnerware. The Silver House (HMUBHUK himubauk) castle in Nuhsu, the seat of the king and from which the Himubauk Period takes its name, is decorated with several tons of ornamental silver from this period. The most notable ornament is the Compass Star (UBNIKMS ubnaikmis) above the entrance of the building, which is featured on the flag of Uhok and symbolizes the united nation. Today the Tahmong Mines are a museum of the Himubauk Period and the silver mining era.


Edso Rainforest
EDSO edso

Image

The Edso Rainforest stretches along the eastern coast on the slopes of the Taimuwek Mountains. Its marine location with westward winds coming from the sea makes it a constant moist environment with an average precipitation of over 1200 mm annually. Spruce, fir, oak, alder and maple dominate the forest on lower altitudes, with pine, also here spruce and birch gradually taking over with higher altitudes. The Edso Rainforest has long been considered a sacred place and with a partially inaccessible terrain the forest has remained unexploited. As an old-growth forest the Edso hosts many species dependent on old or dead wood, such as lichens, fungi, beetles and many birds. Many legends in Ivook folklore takes place or refers to the Edso Rainforest and the ever-present mist is a source of mystique and obscurity. The mist is believed to be the embodiment of certain spirits with the power to entrance or confuse people who wander into the forest. The Edso Rainforest is considered to be the place where spirits travel between the Earthworld and the Otherworld. The Edso Rainforest is viewed as a place of chaos and madness, but also vitality and creativity, and is often thought of as the opposite of the Nalaig Lake, which associated with calm, serenity and wisdom.


Tsinkas Garden (O)
CNKSBUNOG tsinkasbunog

The Tsinkas Garden is a large garden or shrine with many old solitary trees. Located at the outlet of the Tsinkas Lake and the source of the Mivo River, the garden consists of many species of trees planted many centuries ago, some of which are not normally found in the surrounding areas, but instead originating from the southwest part of the country. Giant pines, spruces, oaks and beeches are surrounded by flowerbeds, paths and ornamental rocks. The garden is managed by hand and with the help of grazing cattle. The garden was partially destroyed by a fire during the Annexation Period and burnt trees can still be seen among younger trees succeeding their older fallen comrades. The biggest tree is a spruce called Tsugnavok (CUGNHOK tsugnavok) reaching 56 meters in height with a tree girth of 5.1 meters. The garden have traditionally been a place of calm and meditation and only a certain number of people are allowed in the garden at once to maintain the peacefulness.


Asobde Highlands
QSOBDEHID asobdevaid

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The Asobde Highlands was the last area where the traditional hunter-gatherer lifestyle was practiced in Uhok, before the logging industry drew people away from the area. The mainly coniferous forests were heavily exploited during the logging rush, which resulted in environmental disasters such as habitat destruction, biodiversity loss and contaminated waters. Today forestry is much less practiced in the region and attempts to restore former habitats have been made. Local and national government still struggle to mend the wounds and regain the trust of the people from the events that happened, both the environmental impact as well as the following economic crisis in the country that resulted in poverty and even famine for tens of thousands of Ivook people, many of whom resided in the Asobde Highlands. The environmental destruction and the loss of lives during this period has become a part of Ivook folklore as the Great Sorrow (HUKLUN huklun).


Sosaiak (E)
SOSQK sosaiak

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Sosaiak is a seaport city on the east coast of Uhok. Its has a population of about 250 000 inhabitants and it is the third largest city in Uhok. The city sits on the shores of the Ansiuk Sound (QNSQUKHEN ansiukven) overlooking Hoiub Island (HOUBGO hoiubgo) to the east. Having been part of the Tsakbe nomadic area, the region experienced a heavy rise in exploitation during the Annexed Period, when logging became a major industry. Sosaiak was originally founded as a port where timber could be shipped off internationally. The city saw a wave of labor immigration during the Saiah Period and today Sosaiak is an educational and commercial center in Uhok, being the seat of two institutes of higher education and several international companies. Sosaiak has the highest standard of living in Uhok, but the gap between the urban dwellers and the population of the nearby Asobde Highlands as well as the rest of the Utsekid region is still very wide. The area receives about 1000 mm of precipitation annually due to heavy seasonal rainstorms coming in from the sea. The most iconic building of the city is the Moon Tower (LHUTED lauted), which was built in commemoration of an earlier burnt down light house on the same spot. The two spheres on the tower's spire represent the two worlds, the Earthworld and the Otherworld, and their dance through the cosmos guided by the Sun (QO io).


The sea (U)
LU lu
The sea is the home of Aimusin (IMUSN aimusin), a great whale-like water spirit. Aimusin brings rainstorms from the sea to bless the land with life-giving water. The end of the sea is where the world meets the sky and the vast spaces beyond the fragile wall of Aimusin's bubble, in which the world rests.
Last edited by Allekanger on 30 Apr 2020 14:40, edited 3 times in total.

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elemtilas
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Re: Uhoq Vernissage

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Just checking in to say how much I've been enjoying your work! (And also thanks for fixing the broken links!)

Allekanger
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Re: Uhoq Vernissage

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elemtilas wrote:
23 Apr 2020 00:56
Just checking in to say how much I've been enjoying your work! (And also thanks for fixing the broken links!)
Thank you! =) I'm glad you like it! I was worried the last post had too much text and information in it for people to be bothered to take it on, but I guess it works then.

I didn't know the links were broken and I didn't know I fixed them, but I'm happy they work anyway! =)

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elemtilas
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Re: Uhoq Vernissage

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Allekanger wrote:
25 Apr 2020 11:18
elemtilas wrote:
23 Apr 2020 00:56
Just checking in to say how much I've been enjoying your work! (And also thanks for fixing the broken links!)
Thank you! =) I'm glad you like it! I was worried the last post had too much text and information in it for people to be bothered to take it on, but I guess it works then.

I didn't know the links were broken and I didn't know I fixed them, but I'm happy they work anyway! =)
Indeed! Well, one map and a couple images weren't working; and then they were; so some magic got done!

As for longer posts, I may not be the best person to gauge whether they work or not by! If you look at my world's thread, you'll see I tend towards long posts.

Just keep your world coming and we'll be content! :mrgreen:

Allekanger
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Re: Uhoq Vernissage

Post by Allekanger »

elemtilas wrote:
25 Apr 2020 14:04
As for longer posts, I may not be the best person to gauge whether they work or not by! If you look at my world's thread, you'll see I tend towards long posts.
I did, and I really enjoy reading your stories, so I'll go for long posts too!
elemtilas wrote:
25 Apr 2020 14:04
Just keep your world coming and we'll be content! :mrgreen:
I'll try my best!

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