Lesson/Guide Requests

A forum for guides, lessons and sharing of useful information.
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Tuyono
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Tuyono »

Isfendil wrote:
27 Feb 2018 16:07
Any ethiopic language yes, like Ge'ez
[+1] I would specially like anything about Amharic.
Isfendil wrote:
27 Feb 2018 16:30
I do think the board would very much benefit from a Hausa guide though.
[+1] Also this!

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k1234567890y
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by k1234567890y »

It would be right if I can have an online wordlist/dictionary and a reference grammar for most Tungusic and Para-Mongolic languages.
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.

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Linguifex
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Linguifex »

Anybody got anything on how to create a hieroglyphic script à la Egyptian?
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clawgrip
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by clawgrip »

Use lots of rebus writing, to the point where there may be as many phonetic signs as logographic signs. Don't merge multiple signs into single compound characters like Chinese does; leave them independent and string them together.

It's not really a guide, but I have made a language with a sort of Egyptian-style conscript, if you want to look at that at all.

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Shemtov
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Shemtov »

Tuyono wrote:
01 Mar 2018 22:15
Isfendil wrote:
27 Feb 2018 16:07
Any ethiopic language yes, like Ge'ez
[+1] I would specially like anything about Amharic.
Isfendil wrote:
27 Feb 2018 16:30
I do think the board would very much benefit from a Hausa guide though.
[+1] Also this!
I've actually started learning Hausa, so when I'm somewhat proficient, I could do an AMA
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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eldin raigmore
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by eldin raigmore »

Linguifex wrote:
13 Sep 2018 01:16
Anybody got anything on how to create a hieroglyphic script à la Egyptian?
The Index Diachronica PDF link in your sig is broken.

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Ser
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Ser »

eldin raigmore wrote:
09 Jul 2019 00:26
Linguifex wrote:
13 Sep 2018 01:16
Anybody got anything on how to create a hieroglyphic script à la Egyptian?
The Index Diachronica PDF link in your sig is broken.
I think he's not taking care of it anymore, particularly since some people grabbed it and made some things with it for some reason. There was some guy who made a (paid) application that generates conlangs that uses it as a component. You can get the Index Diachronica (and also search it) on this website made by someone else (not Linguifex / Pogostick Man).
hīc sunt linguificēs. hēr bēoþ tungemakeras.

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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Linguifex »

Thanks for letting me know about the link.

chri d. d. has been gracious enough to make a working searchable version, so I'd have to send him any further drafts before I do anything else.

It isn't that I don't want to take care of it anymore, it's more that real life—particularly work and health issues—have gotten in the way. I've been meaning to add to it for quite some time but just haven't had the time or energy.

I'll have to fix the link soon. I think Slorany on reddit has the PDF hosted somewhere, I might just use that link.
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Shemtov
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Shemtov »

Shemtov wrote:
09 Jul 2019 00:06
Tuyono wrote:
01 Mar 2018 22:15
Isfendil wrote:
27 Feb 2018 16:07
Any ethiopic language yes, like Ge'ez
[+1] I would specially like anything about Amharic.
Isfendil wrote:
27 Feb 2018 16:30
I do think the board would very much benefit from a Hausa guide though.
[+1] Also this!
I've actually started learning Hausa, so when I'm somewhat proficient, I could do an AMA
Hausa is too weird to wrap my head around (I get the theory, but as a spoken language..... [O.O] ), but I'm now trying to learn Amharic, so I might be able to do an AMA about the language, especially comparing it to other Semitic languages, like Hebrew and Arabic
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Shemtov
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Shemtov »

Would anyone be interested in an eventual AMA of Spoken Tibetan? Or Mongolian?
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Ser
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Ser »

I'd prefer Spoken Tibetan. There seems to be less easily accessible materials on that, as opposed to Classical/Written Tibetan.
hīc sunt linguificēs. hēr bēoþ tungemakeras.

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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Oil In My Lamp »

Does anyone have or want to give lessons for Tagalog? I would like to get to understand the grammar.
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Shemtov
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Shemtov »

Shemtov wrote:
17 Nov 2017 18:31
Davush wrote:
17 Nov 2017 11:47
Shemtov wrote:
16 Nov 2017 18:46
Is there anybody who knows enough about :ara: dialects to make a thread about them- their different sound systems, their correspondences in their sound systems, their different morphosyntax? I'm learning MSA, and given that I'm Jewish a trip to Israel is likely in my future (though I don't have any plans right now) and despite tensions, Palestinian Arabic is an important language there, especially since the Kotel is in East Jerusalem, and South Levantine Bedawi Arabic is also important there given Negev Bedouins.
I could give a brief overview of the main dialects groups, but I only really speak Northern Gulf/Southern Iraqi (and MSA) with any accuracy, so my description of Levantine/Egyptian/North African dialects would be very broad and general.
I wasn't expecting anyone to speak all the dialects, so I was eally asking for an overview, so that would be fine.
On a similar note, does anyone know enough about the Chinese"dialects" to make a comparitive guide? I'm leaning Mandarin and have read about Cantonese, but I haven't been able to find a good overview of other Sinitic languages
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien

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Ser
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Ser »

Shemtov wrote:
14 May 2020 10:47
On a similar note, does anyone know enough about the Chinese"dialects" to make a comparitive guide? I'm leaning Mandarin and have read about Cantonese, but I haven't been able to find a good overview of other Sinitic languages
I doubt anyone here knows, but I'd love to be surprised.

Also it is true that no good overviews of Sinitic at large exist, even in Mandarin, but this is largely because the varieties of Chinese in general continue to be heavily understudied, especially in terms of their grammar. Much more has been researched and documented about their synchronic and diachronic phonology and their content word lexicon. Note that although decent, very thick dictionaries of single content words of Cantonese, Shanghainese and Min Nan already existed by the 19th century, which were very helpful to early researchers of Middle and Old Chinese in the 1920s and 1930s like Bernhard Karlgren and Yuen Ren Chao, the first long grammatical monograph of Cantonese was not written until the 1990s ("an embarrassing gap considering the extensive related literature, which has now been finally resolved", said one academic review at the time), the first such work on Shanghainese not until the 2000s, and the first one on (Taiwanese) Min Nan not until the 2010s. IIRC the best existing overview of the grammar of a Hakka dialect is about 80 pages long...

Understanding about the grammar of most dialects continues to be confined to papers on very specific topics of specific dialects.

I sometimes wonder if this is an influence of grammar being less prominent, less obvious, in many ways less difficult to grapple with in highly isolating languages, so that people that get involved in Chinese linguistics tend to prefer to care about phonology or lexicography instead. It amuses me that more effort seems to have been made so far to scrape as much old Wu lexicon as possible out of Ming- and Qing-era vernacular literature than to study the grammar of Mao Zedong's old Gan dialect...
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Re: Lesson/Guide Requests

Post by Salmoneus »

It may also reflect the attitude toward 'dialect', and I think it mirrors the history of study of Romance languages. When quaint yokels have funny words, they're interesting, and may reflect ancient heritage lost in the diluted speech of the city (/capital region/etc). When they systematically pronounce things oddly, that's a great resource for understanding the glorious history of the standard language, because their sound changes help you understand the parent language.

But when the quaint yokels just don't know their language good, use childish word orders, fail to understand the obvious inherent logic of polarity-inverting double negation or the like, that's just them being embarrassing idiots and not something worthy of serious study.


Obviously, most academic linguists no longer think like this explicitly. But I do wonder if it shapes subconsciously still the priorities and assumptions of researchers when it comes to non-standard 'dialects'.

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