Language practice thread

A forum dedicated to the studying of natural languages and for discussions in languages other than English.
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Dormouse559
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Dormouse559 »

ixals wrote:
31 Dec 2017 16:52
Bu çok enteresan! Ailemin yeni şey için açık olmaduğudan dolayı bunu asla yapamarız. [:S] Aile filmlerini sadece baktık.
That's very interesting! We could never do that because my family doesn't have an open mind for new things. We only watched family movies.
Mais les films peuvent aussi être amusants. Lesquels avez-vous regardés ?
But watching movies can be fun, too. Which ones did you watch?

Pour l'anecdote, je trouve ça très intéressant que le turc a emprunté « Noël » au français.
By the way, I find it really interesting that Turkish borrowed French Noël.

Les emprunts français sont communs en turc ?
Are French loans common in Turkish?

All4Ɇn wrote:
31 Dec 2017 17:55
Je passe ces derniers journées jours avec ma famille. C'est mon premier Noël depuis être allé mon départ à l'université et la virée que j'ai faite pour aller arriver ici était trop longue!
I've been spending the past few days with my family. It's my first Christmas since I got to college and the trip I took to get here was too long!

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eldin raigmore
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by eldin raigmore »

Dormouse559 wrote:
01 Jan 2018 22:58
Les emprunts français sont communs en turc ?
Are French loans common in Turkish?
Yes, they are. "femme de chambre" has become a single word in Turkish.

I think it possible "tuvalet", which is from "toilet", is an English loan.

Sorry I can't say that in either Turkish or French.

If I claimed to be practicing my English, would you forgive me?

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ixals
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by ixals »

Dormouse559 wrote:
01 Jan 2018 22:58
Mais les films peuvent aussi être amusants. Lesquels avez-vous regardés ?
But watching movies can be fun, too. Which ones did you watch?
Biliyorum! Ama aile filmleriyle ailemin filmini kastettim. [:D] Ev videosi gibi?
I know! But with family movies I wanted to say movies of my family. Like a home video?
Dormouse559 wrote:
01 Jan 2018 22:58
Pour l'anecdote, je trouve ça très intéressant que le turc a emprunté « Noël » au français.
By the way, I find it really interesting that Turkish borrowed French Noël.

Les emprunts français sont communs en turc ?
Are French loans common in Turkish?
Evet! Vikipedi, Türk dilde beş bin Fransız kelimenin olduğunu söyledi. Onların nazal ünlüyi Türkçe’ye uyarladıklar gibi en çok hoşuma gidiyor:
Yes! Wikipedia said that there are five thousand French words in the Turkish language. How they adapted the nasal vowels to the Turkish language is what I like the most:
(I won't translate the rest into Turkish because that's too difficult and/or exhausting for me now [D;])

enteresan < intéressant
doküman < document
prenses < princesse
sembol < symbole
konsantrasyon < concentration

See that silent final consonants are completely absent so they don't appear whenever a suffix is added either (doküman > dokümana (document-DAT); spor (sport) > sporcu (athlete)). Then there are some words that - at least in my opinion - look like they could be from another language in the Near East as well just because of how different the orthography is:

kalite < qualité
randıman /randɯman/ < rendement
over < ovaire (this one has been replaced by yumurtalık, apparently meaning "egg container" if taken literally :wat:)
detay < détail

Although I don't know how legit this is, but I've read somewhere on Reddit that you could jokingly (or not) use French words in case you forgot the Turkish word and you would sound very wannabe smart:

hızlandırmak > akselere etmek ("to do accélérer")
hazırlıksız yaratmak > emprovize etmek
uyarlamak > adapte etmek
danışmak > konsülte etmek
Native: :deu:
Learning: :gbr:, :chn:, :tur:, :fra:

Zhér·dûn a tonal Germanic conlang

old stuff: Цiски | Noattȯč | Tungōnis Vīdīnōs

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All4Ɇn
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by All4Ɇn »

Je crois que presque tous mots turcs qui ont un « j » viennent du français.
I believe that almost all Turkish words that have a "j" come from French.
Spoiler:
All4Ɇn wrote:
31 Dec 2017 17:55
Je passe ces derniers journées jours avec ma famille. C'est mon premier Noël depuis être allé mon départ à l'université et la virée que j'ai faite pour aller arriver ici était trop longue!
Oh là là. Beaucoup d'erreurs ! C'est ce qui m'arrive quand je tape trop vite. [xP]
Oh man. So many mistakes! That's what happens when I type too fast
Last edited by All4Ɇn on 20 Jan 2018 06:42, edited 1 time in total.

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Aszev
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Re: Language practice thread

Post by Aszev »

ixals wrote:
02 Jan 2018 00:37
Evet! Vikipedi, Türk dilde beş bin Fransız kelimenin olduğunu söyledi. Onların nazal ünlüyi Türkçe’ye uyarladıklar gibi en çok hoşuma gidiyor:
Yes! Wikipedia said that there are five thousand French words in the Turkish language. How they adapted the nasal vowels to the Turkish language is what I like the most:
(I won't translate the rest into Turkish because that's too difficult and/or exhausting for me now [D;])

enteresan < intéressant
doküman < document
prenses < princesse
sembol < symbole
konsantrasyon < concentration
Auf Schwedisch sind die französischen Nasalvokalen normalerweise als /ŋ/ entlehnt, was oft auch <ng> geschrieben wird.
In Swedish the French nasal vowels are usually loaned as /ŋ/, which is often also written as <ng>.

Zum Beispiel:
For example:

bassin > bassäng /baˈsɛŋː/
gratin > gratäng /graˈtɛŋː/
compliment > komplimang /kɔmplɪˈmaŋː/
bouillon > buljong /bɵlˈjɔŋː/

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