Sarikan

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Harkani
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Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

Phonology:
the left is IPA, the right is their latin script equivalent
==========================================================================
m n/<m n>
p t k ʔ kʷ/ <p t k ' kw>
s z f v θ h ʃ/ <s z f v th h sh>
w l j ɬ/ <w l y ł>
t͡s tʃ dʒ/ <ts ch j>
/ɻ~ɹ/ <r>

a i o u e/ a i o u e

note: while ejectives DO exist, they're mostly considered to be pretty close to the original and are thus ignored in the script (which IS NOT done yet...)
note2: all diphthongs go from open to closed, I.E. ai, ui,oi, and not the other way around (there is no oa, which is realized as owa, or an ia, realized as iya).

==========================================================================


Sarikan is a VSO, agglutinative (or so I believe. It seems to head more towards polysynthetic), austronesian-aligned language spoken in the northern region of Aster'rahl, as part of the Asterian language family.


There are four persons in Sarikan. The fourth person refers to things normally considered to be inanimate, such as concepts. It also refers to things with no sense of self, such as a hive of bees or a corporation, as well as referring to GENERAL concepts of sentient beings or otherwise. TL;DR it's similar to a pronoun for indefinite articles.

(8/14/12) Alright, I've come up with a minor vocabulary that can be found here. Most of it is there, and I know I'm missing some basic words, but that can be fixed.

1/21/12 so I finally got around to updating this page.
Last edited by Harkani on 21 Jan 2013 22:43, edited 5 times in total.
"You can rant all you want about how amazing the video game industry would be if only you controlled it, but all you're accomplishing is confirming my image of you as a total crank." - Micamo 2011
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Re: Sarikan

Post by thaen »

Examples?

Also, phonemes are usually written in slashes //, while the orthographic realizations are written in angled brackets <>.

So,
/m n/ <m n>
/p t k g ʔ/ <p t k g>
/s z ts f v θ x h ʃ/<s z tz f v th kh h>
/w l j ɬ/ <w l y ł>
/tʃ dʒ/ <ch j>
/r/ <r>
Also, you have only a few posts...Are you new to the board? If so, may I be the first to say, "Welcome!"
:con: Nillahimma
:con: Øð!
:con: Coneylang

I am the Great Rabbit. Fear me, O Crabs!
Spoiler:
ı θ ð ʃ ɲ ŋ ʔ ɛ ə ø ʑ ɕ ʷ ʲ ⁿ
Harkani
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

thaen wrote:Examples?

Also, phonemes are usually written in slashes //, while the orthographic realizations are written in angled brackets <>.

So,
/m n/ <m n>
/p t k g ʔ/ <p t k g>
/s z ts f v θ x h ʃ/<s z tz f v th kh h>
/w l j ɬ/ <w l y ł>
/tʃ dʒ/ <ch j>
/r/ <r>
Also, you have only a few posts...Are you new to the board? If so, may I be the first to say, "Welcome!"
yep. I can't be on here often since my computer hates this site and all it entails (i.e. I can often not log in...)
and I can provide a couple of examples. As soon as I figure out how to edit the original post.
"You can rant all you want about how amazing the video game industry would be if only you controlled it, but all you're accomplishing is confirming my image of you as a total crank." - Micamo 2011
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Taernsietr »

You have a few weird gaps: /k tʃ f s/ have voiced pairings, but most others do not (I'd say this is specially weird on the stops.)

Overall, it's a pretty basic IE-looking inventory :D except you mentioned ejectives but gave nothing else on them.

Also, anything on allophony, phonotactics, prosody?

On the vowel roms., why not use something a little more sucinct? Maybe <i e ä> for /i ɨ æ/?

(nitprick) When you say 'oa ia' are realized as 'owa iya', do you mean they get written that way? If you mean they are pronounced as if they were written like that, perhaps you could be a bit clearer. (/nitprick)

I'd also like to see examples of the verb system.

And what do you mean non-verb non-pronouns (I would think you meant nouns, or maybe stuff like relatives and demonstratives?) aren't conjugated but have adpositions? What do they do then?

Wouldn't it be better to call the 4th person a animacy-split 3rd person or something similar?

Is definition informed by adpositions?
Native: :bra:
Fluent: :eng:
Inept: :nor: :lat:
Interested: :deu: :zho: :rus: :ara: :heb: :swe:
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Re: Sarikan

Post by thaen »

As soon as I figure out how to edit the original post.
No need. Just post again.
:con: Nillahimma
:con: Øð!
:con: Coneylang

I am the Great Rabbit. Fear me, O Crabs!
Spoiler:
ı θ ð ʃ ɲ ŋ ʔ ɛ ə ø ʑ ɕ ʷ ʲ ⁿ
Harkani
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

Taernsietr wrote:You have a few weird gaps: /k tʃ f s/ have voiced pairings, but most others do not (I'd say this is specially weird on the stops.)

Overall, it's a pretty basic IE-looking inventory :D except you mentioned ejectives but gave nothing else on them.

Also, anything on allophony, phonotactics, prosody?

On the vowel roms., why not use something a little more sucinct? Maybe <i e ä> for /i ɨ æ/?

(nitprick) When you say 'oa ia' are realized as 'owa iya', do you mean they get written that way? If you mean they are pronounced as if they were written like that, perhaps you could be a bit clearer. (/nitprick)

I'd also like to see examples of the verb system.

And what do you mean non-verb non-pronouns (I would think you meant nouns, or maybe stuff like relatives and demonstratives?) aren't conjugated but have adpositions? What do they do then?

Wouldn't it be better to call the 4th person a animacy-split 3rd person or something similar?

Is definition informed by adpositions?
in the order you posed the questions...

They are voiced BECAUSE I DECLARE THEM TO BE SO. That and /b/ tends to bring back baaad memories.

What do ya expect? I'm new to this. IE is to be expected. ANd on ejectives, they are only given to the voiceless stops, and are considered phonemic, but culturally they are not considered "true" consonants and forced to be digraphs in order to realize them I.E. tt for t'.

Prosody is nonphonemic. Its stresses come from its ancestors, which had tones. Otherwise, it seems completely random.

Allophony... hmm... Well, after an ejective, there IS a lengthened vowel, common to all nine dialects. Otherwise, I can't talk about them since it varies from dialect to dialect.

Ah, phonotactics.
Well, the typical syllable is (C)V(C). However, before a consonant, there can be anything that is NOT a stop/the same consonant (or pt/tp/tk/kp/gp/pg). Thus, it can be a nasal, a non-bilabial fricative, a rhotic, or a lateral (I.E. ln, rn, rm, st, nt). Also, there are no word-initial consonant clusters, nor word-final consonant clusters. In fact, you change the form of your conjugation based on whether or not the last syllable ended in a vowel or a consonant.

I don't like the letter e. And I mentioned it's based on Navajo. This includes vowel roms.

The "owa iya" sort of thing is both pronounced and written that way. Sorry, I am terrible at phrasing.

What I mean is simple. If it isn't either a noun or a pronoun, then you don't conjugate them ever in a quadrillion years. essentially, it's like you have (verb) atiri[preposition] (noun) ishatu[postposition] nakhi rii(pronoun). Nouns basically let the listener figure out what you're referring to and adjectives describe them.

I suppose so, since I have no idea what the heck an animacy-split 3rd person is.

I believe so. I can't say much beyond that, since wikipedia is being evil today.
"You can rant all you want about how amazing the video game industry would be if only you controlled it, but all you're accomplishing is confirming my image of you as a total crank." - Micamo 2011
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Taernsietr »

On the consonants: I don't know if you are aiming for a naturalistic language, though I presume you are. I mention that because it's a common newbie characteristic (again, a presumption) to ignore the symmetry languages generally have; which is to say, some gaps *are* found in natlangs, but they aren't that widespread, especially in voicing AFAIK. If you're interested, see this WALS page.
Also, did you mean 4chan's /b/ by any chance? D:

There's nothing bad with making a IE-ish language. In fact, in my opinion is it's even better to start with something you know better before learning of more "foreign" stuff. That said, I also don't see much wrong in adding a feature you're not exactly familiar with, as long as you have a certain understanding of how it works (you did write that you only have voiceless ejectives: voiced ejectives aren't possible). Also, since you added ejectives, might as well put them on your chart :D. And do be clear on the distinction of grapheme (symbol), phoneme (phonological abstraction) and phone (physical realization) - forcing a sound you said to be phonemic to be a digraph does not make it something else.

On prosody: even if it is phonemically irrelevant, it is still there. You might want to think how it works in your language, and describe it even if not in the most accurate terms.

On allophony: No need to invent stuff just for the hell of it, but as you try out your language (which you should do, and often) you might see some changes you can have; for example, vowels may have different realizations in stressed positions, consonants may palatalize before high vowels... no real need to have an awesomely huge allophony section, though.

On phonotactics... I don't understand what you mean. Do you mean though (C)V(C) syllables are allowed, stop + stop sequences are not allowed? If that's the case, you can only refer to "external clusters" (where the segments are in different syllables).

On romanization: You said you dislike it, but you use it in the digraph for /æ/ :3. Also, Orthography isn't so good a thing to base upon your inspirations... Especially when they would produce confusing results: You can well have a <tiiin> sequence there which wouldn't become <tiyin> :3. It's okay to try a specific aethetic, just make sure it works well.

Your example didn't give me much - what do those words mean? Also, do think on what you understand by conjugation. By what you're saying, nouns aren't morphologically altered (their form is never changed) but they are inflected externally, by adpositions.

On the pronouns, I just meant you could have a different set for inanimate pronouns instead of calling them a "fourth person".

Definition is simple: an apple (indefinite) vs. the apple (definite). How is this encoded?
Native: :bra:
Fluent: :eng:
Inept: :nor: :lat:
Interested: :deu: :zho: :rus: :ara: :heb: :swe:
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

Taernsietr wrote:On the consonants: I don't know if you are aiming for a naturalistic language, though I presume you are. I mention that because it's a common newbie characteristic (again, a presumption) to ignore the symmetry languages generally have; which is to say, some gaps *are* found in natlangs, but they aren't that widespread, especially in voicing AFAIK. If you're interested, see this WALS page.
Also, did you mean 4chan's /b/ by any chance? D:

There's nothing bad with making a IE-ish language. In fact, in my opinion is it's even better to start with something you know better before learning of more "foreign" stuff. That said, I also don't see much wrong in adding a feature you're not exactly familiar with, as long as you have a certain understanding of how it works (you did write that you only have voiceless ejectives: voiced ejectives aren't possible). Also, since you added ejectives, might as well put them on your chart :D. And do be clear on the distinction of grapheme (symbol), phoneme (phonological abstraction) and phone (physical realization) - forcing a sound you said to be phonemic to be a digraph does not make it something else.

On prosody: even if it is phonemically irrelevant, it is still there. You might want to think how it works in your language, and describe it even if not in the most accurate terms.

On allophony: No need to invent stuff just for the hell of it, but as you try out your language (which you should do, and often) you might see some changes you can have; for example, vowels may have different realizations in stressed positions, consonants may palatalize before high vowels... no real need to have an awesomely huge allophony section, though.

On phonotactics... I don't understand what you mean. Do you mean though (C)V(C) syllables are allowed, stop + stop sequences are not allowed? If that's the case, you can only refer to "external clusters" (where the segments are in different syllables).

On romanization: You said you dislike it, but you use it in the digraph for /æ/ :3. Also, Orthography isn't so good a thing to base upon your inspirations... Especially when they would produce confusing results: You can well have a <tiiin> sequence there which wouldn't become <tiyin> :3. It's okay to try a specific aethetic, just make sure it works well.

Your example didn't give me much - what do those words mean? Also, do think on what you understand by conjugation. By what you're saying, nouns aren't morphologically altered (their form is never changed) but they are inflected externally, by adpositions.

On the pronouns, I just meant you could have a different set for inanimate pronouns instead of calling them a "fourth person".

Definition is simple: an apple (indefinite) vs. the apple (definite). How is this encoded?
again, in the order posed...

no, not /b/, just that I found making satisfying words to be difficult with b or d. Generally I sometimes miss having /d/ and /b/ around for making new words (I still do occasionally mess up the orthography, in fact, by adding /d/ and /b/ where there is none.

I have no idea what the three of theme mean. so I guess I'm stuck on that and will have to try again.

Allophony... ._. I have no words to describe how difficult that is to try and work with.

Whenever I try my language out (I.E. pronouncing it out loud), there is nothing to GRASP in terms of prosody. What I mean by this is that every time I try the language, I stress one thing over the other, or none at all.

The vowel romanizations are annoying, to say the least. I can't actually change it around, as that involves updating massive amounts of material across the internet and it's a pain to do so. Also, I've gotten used to it, so it would involve me relearning it AGAIN. ugh.

The words are nonsense. Ignore them. ANd yeah, I meant they aren't morphologically altered, but inflected externally. C'mon man, it's my first conlang. I don't even understand anything on WALS yet.

Reworking pronouns is boring. I'll stick with my fourth person pronoun (Nah /n a h/).

In which case there is no dedicated definitive per se. There is "only" (rii), but it can also refer to how many there is of something. Otherwise, it's all indefinite unless you decide to code it with some prepositions as to where it is located...
"You can rant all you want about how amazing the video game industry would be if only you controlled it, but all you're accomplishing is confirming my image of you as a total crank." - Micamo 2011
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Taernsietr »

I hope you aren't feeling overwhelmed by my replies, for I only mean to help...

---

Anyway, it goes like this: a grapheme is a graphical abstract representation of something, which in an alphabet generally corresponds to a phoneme. For example, think of the latin letter <t>.

A phoneme is a phonological abstraction that represents an unit in a language's phonology; take for example /t/ in English: it is generally aspirated ([tʰ]) word-initially (e.g. tip, temper) and may be lowered ("become") to a tap ([ɾ]) between vowels when unstressed (e.g. metal, at all). It can even be elided ("not spoken") word-finally. You might realize these sounds aren't the same, but still think of them as /t/ in English.

Phones are sounds. Inside a phonology, they'll mostly be reffered to as allophones: sounds represented by a single phoneme. So, for English, one can say the letter <t> represents the phoneme /t/, with the environment-dependant realizations [t tʰ ɾ Ø].

And as thaen said, <> is for orthography (graphemes), // for phonemes and [] for (allo)phones. I hope this is clear :3.

---

That being said, you might be thinking of Sarikan orthographically. That's quite notable from the fact you even use <b d> here and there: you're keeping what looks good first and probably hearing it after. It's generally best (harder, granted, but still) to go the other way around, from phones to phonemes to orthography.

Making a creative allophony can be a bit taxing, yes. But as I said already, you don't *need* to do it (or rather: describe it) right away. Remember what I explained on realizations of a phoneme.

If you think there's nothing to Sarikan's prosody, you are probably using your L1's (native language) on it. Which isn't inherently wrong, perhaps only somewhat not creative. Don't feel bad though, prosody can be a bit hard to understand at times, specially if your L1 doesn't give much attention to it. But some things can be quite fun to work with; take intonation in English for example. It generally follows specific patterns for affirmations, questions, sarcastic remarks... and you can even use it to focus one thing or another in a sentence, completely changing the resulting semantics. See the examples:

You are going to clean that mess. (You, not someone else)
You are going to clean that mess. (You don't have any options)

On the romanization: You'll never have more material than you can update. And for something like this, you should. Hell, you don't even have to go on every board you ever posted and rewrite stuff just because you changed it! Imagine if you decided to change the verbal paradigm completely, what would you do then? :3

On definiteness: that is a bit weird. Languages tend to either use articles (English 'a, the', Portuguese 'um, uma, uns, umas, o, a, os, as') or affixes of some sort (Norwegian '-en, -a, -et, -er, -ar, -ane, -ene').

---

There's nothing wrong in not knowing stuff. Hell, I'm also a newbie :P. Just avoid being afraid of changing things because you don't know other ways of doing them. If you learn what aspects are useful (say, definiteness), you can simply think of how you can/want to encode that in your conlang.

And, of course, seeing how languages tend to do things, if you aim for a naturalistic result.
Native: :bra:
Fluent: :eng:
Inept: :nor: :lat:
Interested: :deu: :zho: :rus: :ara: :heb: :swe:
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

Best I got on prosody:
Normally you stress every third syllable in a verb [where S is stress and s is unstressed] to make ssSssSssS, or SssSssSss. However, when using the sarcastic marker, you stress every second syllable for SsSsSsSs as an example.

In a noun, you stress the last two syllables (sSS). Using Sarcasm, it becomes (sSs).
In adpositions, adjectives, and adverbs, You stress either the first syllable or the last syllable, depending on the stress before the word (sS ssS, or Ss Sss).
All monosyllables are stressed. Unless the next word begins in a stress (ss S, s S, s Sss)

Thus, for a sentence whose rough translation is "I don't speak sarikan", you get...
SHI’ o’telhGAtsutaiK'A TAH sarijanTA

that good enough for ya?
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Prinsessa »

Looks like a very singing language. I would like to hear sound samples.

The sarcasm thing is interesting. Is it attested in any natural languages? It looks like something that could happen somewhere. I've seen weirder stuff in natural ones.
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

Skógvur wrote:Looks like a very singing language. I would like to hear sound samples.

The sarcasm thing is interesting. Is it attested in any natural languages? It looks like something that could happen somewhere. I've seen weirder stuff in natural ones.
You mean to tell me you aren't aware of the one thing that English does RIGHT? It may not be sarcastic TONE, but sarcastic stress is my way of saying "I are unique".
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Xing »

Harkani wrote:
note: while ejectives DO exist, they're mostly considered to be pretty close to the original and are thus ignored in the script (which IS NOT done yet...)
Are the ejectives phonemic (contrasting) or not?

note2: all diphthongs go from open to closed, I.E. ai, ui,oi, and not the other way around (there is no oa, which is realized as owa, or an ia, realized as iya).
Is this another way of saying that a sequence like /oa/ consinsts of two syllables? (A hiatus rather than a diphthong?)

The verb is quite possibly the most important part of the language, as it identifies almost everything in a sentence. By including the agent trigger, it is in fact possible to explain an otherwise complex sentence in one word (although that word DOES tend to be pretty long)
What does "complex sentence" mean? Sentences that involved multiple clauses? How long can those words be? Do you have any examples?

There are four persons in Sarikan. The fourth person refers to things normally considered to be inanimate, such as concepts. It also refers to things with no sense of self, such as a hive of bees or a corporation, as well as referring to GENERAL concepts of sentient beings or otherwise. TL;DR it's similar to a pronoun for indefinite articles.
Why should one analyse the "fourth person" as a separate person, rather than as a gender distinction within the third person?
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

Xing wrote:
Harkani wrote:
note: while ejectives DO exist, they're mostly considered to be pretty close to the original and are thus ignored in the script (which IS NOT done yet...)
Are the ejectives phonemic (contrasting) or not?

note2: all diphthongs go from open to closed, I.E. ai, ui,oi, and not the other way around (there is no oa, which is realized as owa, or an ia, realized as iya).
Is this another way of saying that a sequence like /oa/ consinsts of two syllables? (A hiatus rather than a diphthong?)

The verb is quite possibly the most important part of the language, as it identifies almost everything in a sentence. By including the agent trigger, it is in fact possible to explain an otherwise complex sentence in one word (although that word DOES tend to be pretty long)
What does "complex sentence" mean? Sentences that involved multiple clauses? How long can those words be? Do you have any examples?

There are four persons in Sarikan. The fourth person refers to things normally considered to be inanimate, such as concepts. It also refers to things with no sense of self, such as a hive of bees or a corporation, as well as referring to GENERAL concepts of sentient beings or otherwise. TL;DR it's similar to a pronoun for indefinite articles.
Why should one analyse the "fourth person" as a separate person, rather than as a gender distinction within the third person?
Ejectives are contrasting, yes.

Regarding diphthings, no, /oa/ and /ia/ just don't exist. at all. you pronounce and write it as /owa/ or /iya/.

By complex, I mean you can potentially have like three agents that are affected by a single verb (if you added the conjunction " shii' ", even more). In a verb, you can combine affixes in order to express ideas that would normally require more roundabout ways of saying things. For example, by combining the future and the indefinite tenses, you get a future indefinite (It will happen sometime in the future. I don't know when...) This applies to agent and patient triggers as well. So when you add them, you do it in order of the agents/patients who perform/receive the verb in the sentence.

WHy? because I have arbitrarily commanded it. The third person assumes either A: you know who your talking about, or B: the people you are talking about you have an idea of whom they may be, but are too numerous/remote to refer to normally.

The fourth person can be used to identify someone you DON'T know, in addition to my previous statements (inanimate things, things that have no self, and general concepts of sentient beings or otherwise). Thus, instead of slamming them all together in one person, I've decided to arbitrate everything by adding a fourth person.
"You can rant all you want about how amazing the video game industry would be if only you controlled it, but all you're accomplishing is confirming my image of you as a total crank." - Micamo 2011
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Omzinesý »

Is /a/ a back vowel /ɑ/ in the lang. I think the vowel system would be more harmonic.
My meta-thread: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=5760
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Xing »

/a/ and /æ/ can be pretty similar. It may be a bit unusual to have them both, especially if there are no low back or mid front vowels. It's likely that /a/ will be retracted to /ä/ or /ɑ/, and/or that /æ/ will be raised to /ɛ/.
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

Xing wrote:/a/ and /æ/ can be pretty similar. It may be a bit unusual to have them both, especially if there are no low back or mid front vowels. It's likely that /a/ will be retracted to /ä/ or /ɑ/, and/or that /æ/ will be raised to /ɛ/.
considering this is all stuff I can pronounce (albeit with difficulty and an inevitable accent...), I have to sorta skip the /ɑ/, since I attempt to pronounce it and it comes out more akin to /o/ than /ɑ/. I hate being unable to pronounce stuff.

And I just realized that the diphthong /aæ/ is now possible according to my phonotactics (not sure if using correctly). Groooaaan.
Omzinesý wrote:Is /a/ a back vowel /ɑ/ in the lang. I think the vowel system would be more harmonic.
I don't care about a harmonic vowel system, yet. shyichayayonitzaeł nah shi' ayaritii tah.
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Xing »

Harkani wrote:
Xing wrote:/a/ and /æ/ can be pretty similar. It may be a bit unusual to have them both, especially if there are no low back or mid front vowels. It's likely that /a/ will be retracted to /ä/ or /ɑ/, and/or that /æ/ will be raised to /ɛ/.
considering this is all stuff I can pronounce (albeit with difficulty and an inevitable accent...), I have to sorta skip the /ɑ/, since I attempt to pronounce it and it comes out more akin to /o/ than /ɑ/. I hate being unable to pronounce stuff.

And I just realized that the diphthong /aæ/ is now possible according to my phonotactics (not sure if using correctly). Groooaaan.
What languages do you speak? Why would [ɑ] come out as [o] rather than [ɔ]? (Since you have the latter in your inventory, I suppose you can pronounc it, and [ɑ] is more close to [ɔ] than to [o]). What about the front vowels - [e] or [ɛ]?
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Re: Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

Xing wrote:
Harkani wrote:
Xing wrote:/a/ and /æ/ can be pretty similar. It may be a bit unusual to have them both, especially if there are no low back or mid front vowels. It's likely that /a/ will be retracted to /ä/ or /ɑ/, and/or that /æ/ will be raised to /ɛ/.
considering this is all stuff I can pronounce (albeit with difficulty and an inevitable accent...), I have to sorta skip the /ɑ/, since I attempt to pronounce it and it comes out more akin to /o/ than /ɑ/. I hate being unable to pronounce stuff.

And I just realized that the diphthong /aæ/ is now possible according to my phonotactics (not sure if using correctly). Groooaaan.
What languages do you speak? Why would [ɑ] come out as [o] rather than [ɔ]? (Since you have the latter in your inventory, I suppose you can pronounc it, and [ɑ] is more close to [ɔ] than to [o]). What about the front vowels - [e] or [ɛ]?
I speak pure AAVE. I can't reproduce [ɑ] to save my life. besides, when you actually do start to try pronouncing the language, everything with an "a" in it starts to sound ridiculous with either [ɑ] or [ä]. I simply like [a] more. even though [æ] is a pain to work with.

and front vowels that arent bore me.
"You can rant all you want about how amazing the video game industry would be if only you controlled it, but all you're accomplishing is confirming my image of you as a total crank." - Micamo 2011
Harkani
hieroglyphic
hieroglyphic
Posts: 64
Joined: 11 Jul 2012 05:25

Re: Sarikan

Post by Harkani »

Couple of things regarding Sarikan:
1: now you can directly conjugate the nouns. yay.
2: x is no longer a phoneme. It got boring, what can I say. Words that used to have x are now k' or kw.
"You can rant all you want about how amazing the video game industry would be if only you controlled it, but all you're accomplishing is confirming my image of you as a total crank." - Micamo 2011
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