Silvish

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cedh
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Re: Silvish

Post by cedh »

So, if I understand it correctly:
- a stressed penult will always be followed by a syllable with an unstressed short vowel
- an unstressed penult will always be followed by a stressed final syllable
- a final syllable with a long vowel will always be stressed

If the above is true, I would suggest the following system, which is similar to your hybrid one but with a few additional rules:
- final stress is typically unmarked
- penultimate stress is marked; using a circumflex if the vowel is long, and an acute/grave if the vowel is short
- in words with an unstressed long penult, final stress on a short vowel is marked with an acute/grave
- final stressed short /e/ is always written é, even when the penult is not long
- in words whose last two syllables both contain vowels with a circumflex accent, the final syllable is stressed

I think this should cover all possible constellations without ambiguity:
/beˈta/ beta
/beˈte/ beté
/beˈteː/ betê
/beːˈte/ bêté
/beːˈteː/ bêtê
/ˈbete/ bète
/ˈbeːte/ bête

Your example text would look like this:

La rrêzoù par cha s' ajìssi d' responsâbletê d' intrettyé trê clê ìnsi que de problêmi lojistic dyun lê neuv uzî qui pouroùye gravaman accablé la hwìn-a lojistìca.

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Dormouse559
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Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 »

Yeah, that system works really well. [:D] I can't wait to start writing things with it. Thank you!

Wé, chou sistêmou màrhe byin byé. [:D] Jou voû pas l' eùra que j' eccrif avé lû. Marchif !

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Re: Silvish

Post by cedh »

You're welcome!

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Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 »

So I don't forget, I learned about an imaginary animal that is said to live in the Alps and other French mountainous areas, called the dahu or dahut. It's distinguished by having one pair of legs shorter than the other, but on either the right or left side. This supposedly makes it easier for the dahu to get around on mountain slopes. There are also names for the two possible leg arrangements. The dahu dextrogyre "clockwise dahu" has shorter right legs and can only go around a mountain clockwise. The dahu lévogyre "counterclockwise dahu" has shorter left legs and can only go counterclockwise.

What exactly a dahu looks like seems to be debatable. A lot of the results on Google Images show a mountain goat-type creature. But there's also a couple that make it look like a nightmarishly stretched rabbit. The Arpitan dictionary where I first learned the term says a dahu looks like a fox.

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Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 »

A little bit of conculture that was on my mind yesterday, plus some related vocab:

Silvia brings in a lot of revenue as an international skiing and snowboarding destination, but there's still a variety of outdoor activities in the summer months. They include hiking (oûra [ˈuː.ʁa]), mountaineering (alpin̄îsmo [ɑl.pŋ̩ˈiː.zmə]) and mountainbiking (velo montânye [vəˈlo mɔ̃ˈtɑː.ɲˑə]).

And for those who miss gliding down the slopes, there's an exhilerating option in downhill longboarding (dessintä long board [dɛˈsɛ̃n.ta ˈlɔ̃ŋ ˈbɔʁ]). In order to reduce the number of people boarding on public roads alongside traffic, some municipalities and ski resorts partnered to allow longboarders to practice on the resorts' roads during the summer. Official competitions are also organized; in those cases, a stretch of road is blocked to traffic, and extra barriers are set up to protect the competitors in inevitable wipeouts (havûtye [ha̝ˈvyː.tjə]). Though Silvia is better known for its dominance in skiing, the country has produced several world champion longboarders.

I've found a video of some people longboarding at various locations that would be within Silvia. Here's another video; it wasn't filmed within Silvish borders, but it is in the Alps and it has fewer cuts.

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Re: Silvish

Post by Lambuzhao »

Dormouse559 wrote:
18 Dec 2019 18:31
So I don't forget, I learned about an imaginary animal that is said to live in the Alps and other French mountainous areas, called the dahu or dahut. It's distinguished by having one pair of legs shorter than the other, but on either the right or left side. This supposedly makes it easier for the dahu to get around on mountain slopes. There are also names for the two possible leg arrangements. The dahu dextrogyre "clockwise dahu" has shorter right legs and can only go around a mountain clockwise. The dahu lévogyre "counterclockwise dahu" has shorter left legs and can only go counterclockwise.

What exactly a dahu looks like seems to be debatable. A lot of the results on Google Images show a mountain goat-type creature. But there's also a couple that make it look like a nightmarishly stretched rabbit. The Arpitan dictionary where I first learned the term says a dahu looks like a fox.
Dahutus montanus! Le dachùt monduño!!

dachùt-ogeoldt
http://ledingoblog.canalblog.com/archiv ... 11028.html

**N.B.: The dahuts that the Çedaran folk know of look more feline~vulpine than goatish.
Also, the adults have less pronounced limb differentiation, and more uniform coat coloration.
If I'm not mistaken, the ones that live in Tirgan montane habitats are descendants of Vivverids that eked out a living in these colder, less hospitable climes far and away from their more tropical cousins.

dachùt-sovogeoltd (a.k.a. dachutìn)-
https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/bogleec ... 6-s45.html
**N.B. - the young have more pronounced limb-length differences due to their preference for more rugged/perilous terrain
to avoid predators and dorturdt or "bokking" (i.e. ramming/shoving) from territorial adults.
Also, the young have a more dappled coat for blending in with the icy cliffsides and purchases.
The Dahut-Ossifrage is their main predator.

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Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 »

Thanks for this new data on the mysterious dahu.
Lambuzhao wrote:
22 Feb 2020 16:09
**N.B.: The dahuts that the Çedaran folk know of look more feline~vulpine than goatish.
Hmm, interesting, so they're more in agreement with my Arpitan dictionary. Come to think of it, where are the Çedarans, anyway? I don't believe I know.
Lambuzhao wrote:The Dahut-Ossifrage is their main predator.
"Bone-breaker" [O.O] Don't think I wanna end up on the wrong side of that.

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Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 »

J' ê bezoên d' un rapel de kalendraê, par s' ke j' ê pa dî tou notâ lo-z 8 an dî silvoê lo 2.
[ʒɛː.bəˈzwɛ̃ː dy.ŋʁa̝ˈpɛl de.ka.lɛ̃ˈdʁyː | pɑʁ.ske.ʒɛˈpa diˈtu nəˈtɑː lo.zyˈtɑ̃ŋ diː.siˈvuː ləˈdu]
I need to set a calendar reminder, because I completely missed that Silvish turned 8 on the 2nd.

Bon anneversêro !
[bo.ŋɑ̃n.ne.vɛˈsɛː.ʁə]
Happy birthday!
:mrgreen:

Silvish is once again in a big state of flux, so I can't do as much with it as I'd like to mark the occasion; maybe next year. As I said in the snowball thread, I'm trying to solidify my understanding of the language's dialectal variation, while also working on a standard written form and a standard way of transcribing actual speech.

I wrote the above two phrases using a rough draft of the written standard. It won't have a prescribed pronunciation; people reading out loud just use their own accent. And the pronunciation I gave is roughly the one I've been using around the forum for a while now; it's possibly the accent of the capital city, Moûtiers.

In-world, the transcription system was developed first, as part of a project to document Silvish dialects. Then, the written standard was created for administrative use, based on both the transcription system and pre-existing writings. I think most writing in everyday/local settings will be in transcription, whereas national or official texts will use the written standard.

The phones that correspond to a given spelling can vary widely, to the point where some spellings are meant just as placeholders, not so much as pronunciation hints. For example, <oe> and <ae>; the former is pronounced as any of [u uj ɑj a], and the latter is pronounced as [y jø je e]. When nasalized, <oe> becomes something like [wɛ̃ wɑ̃].

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Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 »

elemtilas wrote:
20 Jun 2020 15:27
Well, if you're not going to share the cake with us, at least share the recipe!

In Silvish!
Bon apetî ! [:P] (Here's the recipe in the current version of the written standard)

Rechèta pau guattê de Silvye

Engredien
  • 6 eûh separà
  • 140g + 100g de çoukro
  • Pelura rappava d' 1 sitron
  • 50g de fekula
  • 150g de farina
  • una pinçèva de sâ
  • au tour de 4 granta kulyaerye de leçê ègro
     
  • Çoukro e buro pau moullo

Prëparasyon
  1. Batê lou jjhaùno d' eûh avek 140g de çoukro e le ppelure rappave de sitron pa lou rrandre bin ekkumeûh.
  2. Ajhottâ petyoâ a petyoâ la farina, la fekula e lo sâ. Au bezoen, asouplissê avek lu leçê ègro.
  3. Komençê a batre lou bblan, dyen un bòlo diferan.
  4. Una koê k' î-z ekkumën, ajhottâ petyoâ a petyoâ 100g de çoukro. Kontinyê a batre lo mekklo, lo montan en nef.
  5. Mekklâ en toute doùçeû lou bblan dyen li jjhaùno.
  6. Burâ larjhemean lo moullo, saùpoùsâ de çoukro. Versâ la prëparasyon dyen lu moullo.
  7. Enfournâ a 150°C 1e a 1e10

On po-t remplaçê lo leçê ègro avek de batu, ou avek de leçê e de jhûh de sitron ou de vinègro ; mé jh' e uzà de leçê avek de jhûh de sitron. Pau gô, jh' avéyo pâh de sitron, alòra jh' e mekklà una granta kulyaerye de vanilye dyen lu leçê. La rechèta d' orijhe reker un moullo de briyòche ; l' e pprobablo k' un moullo de bundt ser aùsï. Jho me su servûh d' un moullo çharnyaeryï, ki a balyè una brava kuçon meâ pâh grançhòza çhe ll' aparançï. To moullo haù ki po-t akeùdre una patta dëlikata devrê servre.


English translation:
Spoiler:
Recipe for Silvia cake (Savoy cake/gâteau de Savoie)

Ingredients
  • 6 eggs, separated
  • 140g + 100g of sugar
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 50g of starch
  • 150g of flour
  • a pinch of salt
  • about 4 tbsp of soured milk
     
  • sugar and butter for the cake pan

Preparation
  1. Beat the egg yolks with 140g of sugar and the lemon zest until fluffy.
  2. Gradually add the flour, starch and salt. As needed, loosen with the soured milk.
  3. Start to beat the whites, in a separate bowl.
  4. Once they foam, gradually add 100g of sugar. Continue beating the mixture, until it reaches stiff peaks.
  5. Gently fold the whites into the yolks.
  6. Generously butter the cake pan and coat it with sugar. Pour the batter into the pan.
  7. Bake at 150°C (300°F) for 1 hour to 1 hour and 10 minutes.

Soured milk can be substituted with buttermilk or with plain milk plus lemon juice or vinegar; I used milk with lemon juice. For flavoring, I didn't have lemons, so I mixed a tablespoon of vanilla into the milk. The original recipe uses a brioche mold; a bundt pan would probably work too. I used a springform pan, which baked the cake fine but didn't do much in the looks department. Any pan with high sides that can handle a delicate batter should work fine.

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Re: Silvish

Post by elemtilas »

Charming! And delicious sounding to boot!

Quite understandable, though i doubt i could do much with a "normal" Silvish text. My sweetie pie uses soured milk, too, when baking, in stead of buttermilk!

I will have to pass this along so I can actually try some proper Silvish cuisine...once I translate all those foreign measures into something normal!

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Re: Silvish

Post by elemtilas »

And done!

Image

Look forward to enjoying this at the weekend!

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Re: Silvish

Post by Dormouse559 »

Ooh, pretty! Is that alchemical notation?
elemtilas wrote:Look forward to enjoying this at the weekend!
Let me know how it turns out [:)]

And while you're here, I wanted to say: I do get the preference for volume measurements; I'm American after all. But getting a scale was kind of amazing. Not having to wonder whether my brown sugar is packed enough? *chef's kiss*

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Re: Silvish

Post by elemtilas »

Dormouse559 wrote:
03 Jul 2020 05:46
Ooh, pretty! Is that alchemical notation?
Indeed, specifically the ancient art of alcoquemy!
Let me know how it turns out [:)]

And while you're here, I wanted to say: I do get the preference for volume measurements; I'm American after all. But getting a scale was kind of amazing. Not having to wonder whether my brown sugar is packed enough? *chef's kiss*
You know it! The lemons are waiting and the sugar is boughten!

One of these days, maybe in another two or three years or so, we'll try this with home grown lemons!

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Re: Silvish

Post by Lambuzhao »

elemtilas wrote:
03 Jul 2020 16:39

You know it! The lemons are waiting and the sugar is boughten!
One of my favorite summer tunes -

🎶Thy lemons are awaitin' and mi sugar is yboughten
And limonaná's abrewin' ere long! 🎵

Spoiler:
Don't agree with the online recipes. Mine's simple. In a tall cup, put two capfuls of lemon or lime juice, 3-4 packets of sugar. Then fill to a little less than half with cold water. Then add unsweetened mint tea to the top.

**NB1 - I use stevia or splenda, so it maybe 2 splenda packets or about 4 stevia packets
**NB2 - I say "unsweetened" mint tea b/c I brew about 4-5 cups worth of strong mint tea (7-8 bags) using a (¿32 ℥ ?) plastic container used by local Asian togo restaurants for either soup/pho broth/homemade sweet tea.
[:P] [:P] [:P]

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Re: Silvish

Post by spanick »

elemtilas wrote:
01 Jul 2020 19:27
And done!

Image

Look forward to enjoying this at the weekend!
Did you post this on Reddit revently?

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Re: Silvish

Post by elemtilas »

spanick wrote:
07 Jul 2020 20:19
elemtilas wrote:
01 Jul 2020 19:27
And done!
Spoiler:
Image
Look forward to enjoying this at the weekend!
Did you post this on Reddit revently?
I did! I think in Neography. Someone liked it well enough to ask for a resource to be made, so they can use it in their own recipes!

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Re: Silvish

Post by elemtilas »

Lambuzhao wrote:
07 Jul 2020 20:17
elemtilas wrote:
03 Jul 2020 16:39

You know it! The lemons are waiting and the sugar is boughten!
One of my favorite summer tunes -

🎶Thy lemons are awaitin' and mi sugar is yboughten
And limonaná's abrewin' ere long! 🎵

Spoiler:
Don't agree with the online recipes. Mine's simple. In a tall cup, put two capfuls of lemon or lime juice, 3-4 packets of sugar. Then fill to a little less than half with cold water. Then add unsweetened mint tea to the top.

**NB1 - I use stevia or splenda, so it maybe 2 splenda packets or about 4 stevia packets
**NB2 - I say "unsweetened" mint tea b/c I brew about 4-5 cups worth of strong mint tea (7-8 bags) using a (¿32 ℥ ?) plastic container used by local Asian togo restaurants for either soup/pho broth/homemade sweet tea.
[:P] [:P] [:P]
Dancin' to that, friend! All except the bit where you put in the tea! [cross] [cross] [cross]

[cross] [cross] [cross] Wrong Input! [cross] [cross] [cross]
Danger Will Robinson! [cross] [cross] [cross]

Even the kitten says No0000000000000000000!

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