Vulgar: a language generator

A forum for all topics related to constructed languages
User avatar
Ahzoh
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4134
Joined: 20 Oct 2013 02:57
Location: Canada

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by Ahzoh »

GamerGeek wrote:I don't like the fact that it has a premium version, but it's still really cool.
I agree, socialist that I am, but we live in a capitalist system and people need to eat.
Image Śād Warḫālali (Vrkhazhian) [ WIKI | CWS ]
Linguistx
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 9
Joined: 11 Apr 2017 11:45

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by Linguistx »

Creyeditor wrote:Wow, I really like the latest version of this [:)]
It's getting better and better,
Thanks! The latest design is even even better, I think you'll find.
I agree, socialist that I am, but we live in a capitalist system and people need to eat.
Incentives, yes. Without incentives the site wouldn't have been built.
Iyionaku
mayan
mayan
Posts: 1927
Joined: 25 May 2014 14:17

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by Iyionaku »

Bugtracker: If you provide a set of identical vowels and consonants (e.g. (/a a a a a/ and /p p p p p/, it sets itself into an infinite loop. It neither breaks nor tells the user that this is not possible (unlike when you have too few sounds).

The results when you set vowels in the consonant section and the other way round are kinda cool, I might even use that for a new language.
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
YourFace
hieroglyphic
hieroglyphic
Posts: 63
Joined: 10 May 2015 20:05

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by YourFace »

There's a weird quirk where different vowels in the same "part" of the mouth (such as /u/ and /y/) will have the same grapheme (<u> in this case) despite the fact that (probably) they did not descend from a single vowel (e.g. /u/, i guess).
Linguistx
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 9
Joined: 11 Apr 2017 11:45

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by Linguistx »

Iyionaku wrote:Bugtracker: If you provide a set of identical vowels and consonants (e.g. (/a a a a a/ and /p p p p p/, it sets itself into an infinite loop. It neither breaks nor tells the user that this is not possible (unlike when you have too few sounds).
Thanks for that. The code is not smart, it just goes "5 vowels and 5 consonants, yep, that's enough". I will make this a low priority fix.
Iyionaku wrote:There's a weird quirk where different vowels in the same "part" of the mouth (such as /u/ and /y/) will have the same grapheme (<u> in this case) despite the fact that (probably) they did not descend from a single vowel (e.g. /u/, i guess).
That's semi by design. Romanizing every single IPA sound is an ugly process. I wanted to avoid excessive amounts of accent marks. This means some IPA sound double up. But you do have complete control over the romanization in the full version.

I made /y/ the letter "u" because French does it. In fact French has both /u/ and /y/ as "u".
User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2943
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by Dormouse559 »

Linguistx wrote:I made /y/ the letter "u" because French does it. In fact French has both /u/ and /y/ as "u".
French only has <u> for /u/ in certain loanwords, like tofu. The usual spelling for /u/ is <ou>.
Linguistx
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 9
Joined: 11 Apr 2017 11:45

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by Linguistx »

Dormouse559 wrote:
Linguistx wrote:I made /y/ the letter "u" because French does it. In fact French has both /u/ and /y/ as "u".
French only has <u> for /u/ in certain loanwords, like tofu. The usual spelling for /u/ is <ou>.
I stand corrected.

Nonetheless, the issue of romanizing every IPA symbol still stands.
User avatar
GamerGeek
sinic
sinic
Posts: 347
Joined: 17 May 2017 18:10
Location: The Universe
Contact:

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by GamerGeek »

Dormouse559 wrote:
Linguistx wrote:I made /y/ the letter "u" because French does it. In fact French has both /u/ and /y/ as "u".
French only has <u> for /u/ in certain loanwords, like tofu. The usual spelling for /u/ is <ou>.
This sounds suspiciously like... another language...
YourFace
hieroglyphic
hieroglyphic
Posts: 63
Joined: 10 May 2015 20:05

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by YourFace »

A little goof you made: in the example text, you've programmed it to use the 2nd person pronouns rather than the 3rd person. "... And you stood holding your hat and turned your wet face to the wind..."

Also, is that sentence a quote from something? I have no idea what its significance us.
Linguistx
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 9
Joined: 11 Apr 2017 11:45

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by Linguistx »

YourFace wrote:A little goof you made: in the example text, you've programmed it to use the 2nd person pronouns rather than the 3rd person. "... And you stood holding your hat and turned your wet face to the wind..."

Also, is that sentence a quote from something? I have no idea what its significance us.
Hey you're right! I'll definitely fix that.

It's a line from Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses. You can hear Werner Herzog reading it aloud here. It's probably the best thing ever. I wanted to translate the whole thing, but it would just become unwieldy.
User avatar
Üdj
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 23
Joined: 07 Sep 2022 00:24

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by Üdj »

Criticisms:
- /ɸ/ is always <ph>. Even if the language doesn't have a sound spelled <f>, and even if it has no <p> or <h>.
- I just generated a random language and got one pharyngeal consonant, a palatal implosive but no palatal stops, and a glottal stop (and a pharyngeal fricative) but no /h/. I think this stands alone and doesn't need an explanation for why it's a problem. Not natural at all.
- Very Anglocentric romanization -- find me one other natural language that uses <u> for /ʌ/ when it has /u/ too.
- Ridiculous vowel systems. Here's the one I just got: /a aː ã e eː ẽ i iː ĩ o oː õ u uː ũ ɔ ɔː ɔ̃ ɛ ɛː ɛ̃ ɪ ɪː ɪ̃ ʊ ʊː ʊ̃ ʌ ʌː ʌ̃/.
- Always spells /ʎ/ with a diacritic on <y> (like ý, ÿ, or ŷ) and never related to <l> at all.
- Going back to phonology, here's a fun question: what language has no /m/? Apparently "Wâbago" doesn't. Also, it has affricates but no fricatives.
- I just made a language with the diphthong /ɨi̯/ -- and no other diphthongs.
- I have yet to make a language that has tones unless it is prompted to.
- It spells diphthongs differently from sequences of those vowels.
/ɸ/, /ʍ/, and /ɴ/ are great sounds, and nothing you say can convince me otherwise.

Native: :usa: Conversational (on a good day): :bra: Moderate: :epo:
User avatar
Ahzoh
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4134
Joined: 20 Oct 2013 02:57
Location: Canada

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by Ahzoh »

Üdj wrote: 20 Sep 2022 04:40- I just generated a random language and got one pharyngeal consonant, a palatal implosive but no palatal stops, and a glottal stop (and a pharyngeal fricative) but no /h/. I think this stands alone and doesn't need an explanation for why it's a problem. Not natural at all.
The generator does not seem to strictly follow the rules of naturalism. Then again, Phoible (the website that documents natural language phonologies) has some really strange languages with strange inventories.

/ʔ/ but no /h/ is not strange, and is found in Akkadian. /ħ or ʕ ʔ/ but /h/ is not strange either and probably found in some Caucasian or Semitic language. Can't say much about a palatal implosive but no other type of palatal, though I think it is heard of to have a palatal implosive but no plain voiced version of that plosive.

And, as OP said, the anglocentric romanization is somewhat by design so as to reduce the usage of diacritic'd letters.
Image Śād Warḫālali (Vrkhazhian) [ WIKI | CWS ]
User avatar
lsd
greek
greek
Posts: 535
Joined: 11 Mar 2011 21:11
Contact:

Re: Vulgar: a language generator

Post by lsd »

as interesting as a conversation with a chatbot...
Post Reply