Boral scratchpad

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Jackk
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Re: Y nomr « un » a « veint »

Post by Jackk »

Y nomr « un » a « veint »

The first few numbers don't offer many surprises:

un dou trei catr cinq sei set ogt nouf dei
[ɪn du tʁi kat ʦɪŋk si sɛt ojt nuf di]
  • In careful speech catr "four" has variable pronunciation based on the following sound: before a vowel it is said [katʁ], while before stops it is often said [ˈkatə].
  • We have the spelling ogt instead of oit (for what seem to be purely æsthetic grounds on the part of mediæval scribes). Compare noit "night".
Catr ant cinq es nouf.
Four plus five is nine.

onç doç treç catorç cinqueç deissei setteç deisogt deinouf veint
[ɔnʦ dɔʦ tʁɛʦ kaˈtɔɐ̯ʦ ʦɪŋˈkwɛʦ diˈsi seˈtɛʦ diˈzojt diˈnuf vin(t)]

Notes:
  • Note the alternation of the two strategies: from Lt. -decem and deis- as a transparent later derivation. Like many Romance language a mix of the two forms ends up prevailing, although the details of which number uses which strategy are unique to Boral.
  • We have cinqueç rather than the expected cinç < Lt. quindecem by analogy with cinq, cinquent "five, fifty", and since cinç clashes next to the longer catorç, deissei.
Jo creye la deisogt parson star ne m'i clas, for la sta setteç.
I thought there were 18 people in my class, but there were 17.
Spoiler:
  • [i nɔmˌbʁ‿ɪn a ˈvint]
  • [ˈkatʁ‿an ˌʦɪŋk ɛs ˈnuf]
  • [ʒo kʁiˌje la diˈzojt pɑɐ̯sɔn ˌstɑɐ̯ nə mi ˈklas | fɔɐ̯ laˌsta seˈtɛʦ]
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Re: Un Poem Cort - Y Lunnair

Post by Jackk »

Un Poem Cort - Y Lunnair

Here's the refrain from a traditional Boral song, first attested in mediæval times (around 1200) but updated to modern orthography and vocabulary. I took most inspiration from this song (alt link), which is one of my favourite songs.
  •   Y lunnair descende nos fair coronnag,
    dona y við un hour mem dou,
    a notr y ter si dur e fier.
      Y lunnair sbloðisce l'eç sofrag,
    rende y fum an reïnbog,
    e l'aurfia tot y possair.

  •   The light comes down to crown us queen
    gives us life for an hour or two
    in the land of the strong and proud.
      The light dazzles the pain away
    turns smoke into a rainbow
    and gilds all the dust.
Spoiler:
/ˌi liˈneʁ deˌxɛnde ˈno feʁ ˌkoʁoˈnɛʝ(ə) | doˌna i ˈvɪθ ɪn ˌuʁ mɛn ˈdu | a ˌnɔtʁ i ˈtɛʁ si ˌdɪʁ e ˈfjɛʁ/
/i liˈneʁ sbloˈðixe ˌlɛʦ soˈfʁɛʝ(ə) | ʁɛnˌde i ˈfɪm an ˌʁe.ɪnˈbu | e ˌloʁfiˈa tɔt ˌi poˈseʁ/
[ˌi liˈnɛɐ̯ deˌʃɛnde ˈno fɛɐ̯ ˌkoʁəˈnɛʒ(ə) | doˌna i ˈvɪθ ɪn ˌʊɐ̯ mɛn ˈdu | a ˌnɔtʁ‿i ˈtɛɐ̯ si ˌdɪːʁ‿e ˈfjɛɐ̯]
[i liˈnɛɐ̯ sbloˈðiʃe ˌlɛʦ soˈfʁɛʒ(ə) | ʁɛnˌde i ˈfɪm an ˌʁe.ɪmˈbu | e ˌlɔɐ̯fiˈja tɔt ˌi poˈsɛɐ̯/]
Image
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Re: Y nomr « veint-un » a « cent »

Post by Jackk »

Y nomr « veint-un » a « cent »

The written forms of the numbers 21-30 should not be too much of a surprise.

veint-un veint-du veint-trei veint-catr veint-cinq veint-sei veint-set veint-ogt veint-nouf trent
[vinˈtɪn vin vinˈdu vinˈtʁi viŋˈkat vinˈ̠ʦɪŋk vinˈsi vinˈsɛt vinˈtojt vinˈnuf ˈtʁɛnt]

Phonetically it is worth noting that the final [t] in veint only surfaces before a vowel, and the nasal assimilates in place - see veint-catr [viŋˈkat]. This pattern continues for all higher multiple of ten, which are as follows:

dei veint trent carent cinquent seisent settent ogtent nouvent cent
[di vint tʁɛnt kaˈʁɛnt ʦɪŋˈkwɛnt siˈzɛnt seˈtɛnt ojˈtɛnt nuˈvɛnt ʦɛnt]
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Re: Un Poem Cort - a deeper look

Post by Jackk »

Un Poem Cort - a deeper look

Let's take a look at the etymology of a few of the more interesting words in the short refrain I showed earlier:
Spoiler:
    Y lunnair descende nos fair coronnag,
dona y við un hour ben dou,
a notr y ter si dur e fier.
    Y lunnair sbloðisce l'eç sofrag,
rende y fum an reïnbog,
e l'aurfia tot y possair.

    The light comes down to crown us queen
gives us life for an hour or two
in the land of the strong and proud.
    The light dazzles the pain away
turns smoke into a rainbow
and gilds all the dust.
  • lunnair
    This word means "light", or often "a ray of light", and descends from Late Latin luminaria through Middle Boral lumnair. It showcases the usual reflex of the Latin inflection -aria, -air.
  • fair coronnag
    A collocation with the sense "to crown", literally "make coronation". Boral exhibits more productive use of the suffix -ag /ɛj/ < Lt. -āticum than similar suffixes in other Romance languages (Fr. -age, Pt. -agem, etc.)
  • ben
    Meaning "or", ben comes originally from Lt. bene and cognate to Fr/Sp. bien etc. In early Old Boral seen in the construction o ben "or else, or even" (cf. Fr. ou bien with the same meaning), but by 800CE the o was completely dropped.
    (More on the ripple effects of this semantic change later [:D] )
  • sbloðir
    From the Mediæval Latin exblaudo "I dazzle", via Old Boral esblodir with the same meaning. (The word is cognate with Eng. bloat, Dan. blød "soft"). An example of the Middle Boral aphæresis of initial /e/ before a sC cluster. It is also an augment -ir verb like we have seen before.
  • reïnbog
    A Old English borrowing of the word reġnboga "rainbow". Though it is spelt with a final <g> (a holdover from the time of the borrowing), the final vowel is /u/ where we would expect /oj/. We deduce that this discrepancy has existed from at least 1200CE, given the presumed rhyme with dou /du/ "two".
  • aurfiar
    Meaning "to gild", this word is first attested in this extract, being formed from aur < Lt. aurum "gold" (with an etymological spelling introduced later during the Renaissance) and the suffix -fiar < Lt. -(i)ficare, which formed factitive or causative verbs. The Boral reflex was still productive at this time.
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Re: Conjugation of star - to be

Post by Jackk »

Conjugation d'y verb star to be

"To be", as in many languages, is one of the most irregular verbs in Boral.

Image

Notes:
  • We see that the conjugation (as in French) takes various parts from either the Latin verb essere "to be" or the verb stare "to stand". The irregularities in the Latin (for example in the remote past and the imperfect subjunctive) remain, now along with more suppletion in the imperfect and participle forms.
  • There is a general rule exemplified above that the third person singular pronoun has two forms: i before a consonant sound, and l' before a vowel sound.
  • The present indicative forms have informal contracted forms used much more often in speaking than in writing:
    jo's tu's i's ; nos'm vos'st il'n
Spoiler:
  • /kɔnˌʒigaˈʦjɔn di vɛʁb ˈstaʁ/
  • [ʒɔs tɪs ɪs | nom vos(t) ɪn]
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Un theorem fondamental

Post by Jackk »

Un theorem fondamental

Cas y theory di group, la's un theorem fort important ant analog parmi plusour branc di mathematic avançað:
In group theory, there is a very important theorem which has analogues in many branches of higher mathematics:

Y theorem primair d'isomorphism
(The first isomorphism theorem)

Image

Let f : G -> H be a homomorphism with domain G and codomain H, both being given groups. Then the quotient G/Ker(f) exists and there is an induced isomorphism from this quotient to the image Im(f) < H. That is, G/Ker(f) = Im(f).
  • /ɪn θe.oˈʁɛm fonˌdamɛnˈtal/
  • /ˈkas i ˌθe.oˈʁi di ˈgʁup | las ɪn ˌθe.oˈʁɛm fɔʁt ˌɪmpɔʁˈtant ant ˌanaˈlɔg paʁˈmi pliˌzuʁ ˈbʁank di maˌθemaˈtɪc ˌavanˈʦaθ/
  • /i θe.oˈʁɛm pʁiˈmeʁ diˈzomɔʁˈfizm̩/
  • /si ˈɛf də ˌʒe a ˌhak ɪn mɔʁˈfizm̩ ant doˌmen ˈʒe e bɛʁs ˈhak | i ˌdu ɛʦ ˌgʁup kalˈkɔn || aˌlɔʁ eˈʃɪst i kwoˌʣjɛnt ˈʒe paʁ niˌjal də ˈɛf e las ˌkɔs fɔʁˈʦaθ ɪn iˌzomɔʁˈfizm̩ ˌdɔk kwoˈʣjɛnt ˌvaʁ liˈmɛj ɪm ˈɛf | ˌɪn suˈgʁup də ˈhak || ɪd ɛst | ʒe paʁ nijal də ɛf e izomɔʁfɪk con ɪm ɛf/
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L'Œculux

Post by Jackk »

L'Œculux - Electromagnetic Radiation

In my head, the existence of Borland (Isr Boral) leads to an alternate history with major divergences occurring after around 500CE. Thus, technical terms such as "electromagnetic radiation" will have different analogues and therefore different derivations.

The word œculux is a latinate compound of œcu- "the full extent of", by analogy with œcumenicus "the whole inhabited world" (and ultimately deriving from Ancient Greek oikou "I inhabit") and lux "light". Modern science recognises the following forms of œculux:
  • œculux scadriscent - ionising radiation, EM waves that can remove elections from atoms. Derived from scadrir "scatter", a borrowing from Old English. This category is itself made up of
    • œculux brevessem - gamma rays. Meaning "shortest", being the comparative of bref < Lt. brevis with the same meaning.
    • œculux penetrant - X-rays. From the present participle of penetrar, a borrowing from Lt. penētrō "I penetrate".
    • The shorter wavelengths of œculux surblauesc -ultraviolet light. A compound of Boral prefic sur- "above" < Lt. super- and Late Latin blau "dark blue" < Frankish blāo along with the adjectivising suffix -esc (disputed etymology, but possibly from Old Norse iskr).
    The non-ionising (nonscadriscent) forms of EM radiation (œculux) are
  • œculux visibil - visibil light. A direct borrowing from Lt. visibilis, mostly displacing native veyabr in scientific contexts.
  • œculux sourubresc - infrared light. By analogy with UV: Boral prefix sou- < Lt. sub- "under" with Lt. ruber, rubrum "red" and the same suffix -esc.
  • œculux hydromovent - microwaves. Literally "water-moving", from the scientific prefix hydro- < Ancient Greek húdōr "water" with the participle movent of mover < Lt. movēre "to move" (though the Boral verb is obsolete, replaced by the borrowing stuirar).
  • œculux longhessem - radio waves. Meaning "longest", being the comparative of lonc < Lt. longus with the same meaning.
Y vig sevent - l'alphabet !
Next time - the alphabet!
Spoiler:
  • (Affected) /ˌløkiˈlix/
    (Standard) /ˌlekiˈlɪx/
    (Capital) [ˌlekɨˈlɪç]
  • /ˌxadʁiˈʃɛnt/ - /ˌbʁeveˈsɛm/ - /ˌpeneˈtʁant/ - /ˌsɪʁbloɛx/ - /ˌvizibɪl/ - /ˌsuʁiˈbʁɛx/ - /ˌhidʁomoˈvɛnt/ - /ˌlongeˈsɛm/
  • (Capital) [ˌxadʁɨˈʃɛn] - [ˌbʁevəˈsɛm] - [ˌpenəˈtʁan] - [ˌsɪɐ̯bloˈwɛç] - [ˌvisɨˈbɪɫ] - [ˌsuʁɨ.ˈbʁɛç] - [ˌhidʁoməˈvɛn] - [ˌlɔŋgəˈsɛm]
  • /i ˌvaj seˈvɛnt | ˌlaɫfaˈbɛt/
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L'Alphabet Borallesc

Post by Jackk »

L'Alphabet Borallesc
The Borlish Alphabet

L'Alphabet borallesc fay ses de veint-set letr, assi scaut :
The Borlish alphabet comprises 27 letters, written:

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ðð Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz
<a be ce de eð e ef ge hac i jot ka el em en o pe cu ar es te u-scon ve ve-scon ix y-grec zet>
/a be ʦe de ɛθ e ɛf ʒe hak i ʒɔt ka ɛl ɛm ɛn o pe ki aʁ ɛs te ixɔn ve vexɔn ɪx igʁɛk ʦɛt/

Notes:
  • The letters Kk Ww Zz appear almost exclusively in loanwords.
  • <H h> /hak/ descends originally from Late Latin accha /axa/ (see It. acca, Fr. ache), with later addition of initial /h/.
  • The -scon element is equivalent to the ordinal scon "second" < Lt. secundus, part of the short order prim, scon, tarç, etc. as compared to the long order primair, doussem, treissem, etc.
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Re: Boral scratchpad - romlang

Post by All4Ɇn »

I'm so glad you're doing more with this! I was really interested in it when you were starting out with it [:D]
Jackk wrote: 22 Sep 2018 13:20The letters Kk Ww Zz appear almost exclusively in loanwords.
Do you have any examples of them occurring in native words as of yet?
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Re: Boral scratchpad - romlang

Post by Jackk »

All4Ɇn wrote: 24 Sep 2018 00:46 I'm so glad you're doing more with this! I was really interested in it when you were starting out with it
'Nia-tey ! Thank you!
All4Ɇn wrote: 24 Sep 2018 00:46 Do you have any examples of them [Kk Ww Zz] occurring in native words as of yet?
None spring immediately to mind - honestly, even Qq Xx are vanishingly rare in native vocab...
Well, there's kirt "spark" and its derivatives like akirtar "(of fire) catch", but that's onomatopœia so it barely counts.
Oo, I found one:
keðar "calm down" - jo kieð, nos keðau < Lt. quiētāre

Examples of loanwords containing <Kk Qq Ww Xx Zz>:

couki biscuit < Dutch koekje "little cake"
quiescent dormant, inactive < Lt. quiēscēns, quiēscentis "resting"
west west < Germanic
hax axe < OldE. æx
zon public square < Lt. zōna "zone"
Spoiler:
  • /ˌni.aˈti/
  • /ˈkɪʁt ǀˌakɪʁˈtaʁ/
  • /keˈdaʁ ǀ ʒo ˈkjɛθ ǀ nos keˈðo/
  • /kuˈki ǀ ˌkwi.eˈʃɛnt ǀ wɛst ǀ hax ǀ zɔn/
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Un Rhym Bardesc

Post by Jackk »

Un Rhym Bardesc

Recently I translated this song into Boral:

Image

Might go through some of the lines later. [:D]
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Refragn

Post by Jackk »

Refragn
Chorus

Con roy de resc-dragon With a dragon-rend roar
Y mal caïra, caïra Evil will fall, will fall
Eç al feroç humiglað Fierce wings humbled
Y mal caïra. Evil will fall

Original:
Spoiler:
Voth aan Joorzahfrul rein With a Dragonrend roar
Vokul fen mah, fen mah Evil will fall, will fall
Fin norok ved viing bonaar The fiercest black wings humbled
Vokul fen mah Evil will fall
Notes:
  • con - with. From Lt. cum, this occurs alongside ant < Lt. habēns, habentis, which also means with. When the intended meaning is by means of, through the use of, con is far more likely to be used.
  • roy - roar. A deverbal of roïr < Lt. rugīre meaning "to roar".
  • resc - rends, tears. Present indicative (3s) of the verb rescar rend, tear, which is a descendant of Lt. resecāre with the same meaning.
  • caïra - will fall. Owed future (3s) of the verb caïr lose, be defeated, from VLt. cadēre, meaning fall, die. Note that the owed future has a connotation of non-volition. The other option (the desired future) is vil caïr and has the sense will (voluntarily) surrender.
  • al - wing. Direct descendant of Lt. āla with the same meaning. Unfortunately my brain insists on reading this word as to the due to contamination from other Romance languages [:D], so I do a double-take every time I get to this word.
  • humiglað - humbled, humiliated. Past participle of the verb humiglar humble, humiliate, a direct borrowing from Lt. humiliāre with the same meaning. This word demonstrates the Boral tendency to borrow -VCiare verbs as -VgCar.
Spoiler:
  • /ʁeˈfʁɛjn/
  • /kɔn ant ǀ ʁoj ʁo.ɪʁ ǀ ʁɛx ʁɛˈxaʁ ǀ ca.iˈʁa ~ cajˈʁa caˈiʁ ˌvɪlkaˈɪʁ | al | ˌhimajˈlaθ ˌhimajlaʁ/
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Stanza Y Prim

Post by Jackk »

Stanza Y Prim
First Verse

First, here is a recording of the chorus, complete with my piano and bad singing :D

Foy, foy de dragon Fire, dragonfire
Vouð gravant d'ir palæochthon Carving vows of prehistoric ire
Vagn, vagn seyon sveilað Awake, awake that wakes up
Prest a y mont rendr ablazað Ready to set the world ablaze

Original:
Spoiler:
Fire, fire, dragonfire
Searing words of ancient ire
Wake, wake from the grave
Rise to set the world aflame
Notes:
  • foy - fire. From Lt. focus "fireplace" and cognate to French feu, It. fuoco, Pt. fogo, Rom. foc etc. all meaning "fire".
  • vouð - oath, vow. Inherited from Lt. vōtum with the same meaning, this is a doublet of vot "vote".
  • gravant - carving. Present participle of gravar "carve, engrave", from VLt. grabāre of Germanic origin and cognate with Fr. graver, Eng. grave.
  • palæochthon - prehistoric. A Greek neologism, from παλαιός - palaiós "old" and χθών - khthon "earth, soil".
  • vagn - awake, aware. A loan from either OldEng. (ġe)wæcned or some form of Old Norse vakna "awaken".
  • sveilað - woken up. Past participle of sveilar "wake up", from VLt. exviglāre < Lt. evigilāre with the same meaning.
  • ablazað - ablaze. From older blaz "flame" (now usually flam) < OldEng. blæse, this word is the past participle of the inchoative derivation a- -ar.
Spoiler:
  • /stanˌza i ˈpʁɪm/
  • /foj | vuθ vɔt | gʁaˈvant gʁaˈvaʁ | ˌpale.ɔkˈθɔn | vɛjn | sviˈlaθ sviˈlaʁ | ˌablaˈzaθ blaz/
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    Y comparatif

    Post by Jackk »

    Y comparatif

    Boral has a rather unique way of forming the regular comparative of adjectives, taking the descendant of the Latin superlative -issimus. The usual form is -essem:
    magn ~ magnessem < Lt. magnus,
    big ~ bigger

    veyabr ~ veyabressem < Old Boral ve- + -abr < Lt. vide- + -abilis
    visible ~ more visible

    The addition of the ending can undo the devoicing of the final consonant.
    bref ~ brevessem < Lt. brevis, brevissimus
    short ~ shorter

    lonc ~ longhessem < Lt. longus
    long ~ longer

    Note the use of <h> to block the <ge> combination, so that <longhessem> is pronounced as <long> + <essem>.

    The superlative has the same form but is used with the definite article.
    Tu es y figl y haltessem.
    2s.sbj be-2s.imp.ind def=child def=tall-comp
    You are the tallest child.

    There is a group of adjectives with a somewhat divergent form, all ending in <r>:
    faur ~ faurrem < Lt. faber
    clever ~ cleverer

    allagr ~ allagrrem < Lt. alacer
    happy ~ happier

    Finally, there are a few entirely irregular adjectives:
    bon ~ meilour
    good ~ better

    mal ~ peyour
    bad ~ worse
    Spoiler:
    • /i ˌkɔmpaʁaˈtɪf/
    • /mɛjn ~ ˌmɛjneˈsɛm ǀ viˈjabʁ ~ viˌjabʁeˈsɛm/
    • /bʁɛf ~ ˌbʁɛveˈsɛm ǀ lɔŋk ~ ˌlɔngeˈsɛm/
    • /ˌti ɛs i ˈfajl i ˌhalteˈsɛm/
      Capital: [tɪz i.vaju j.awʦɛ̃ŋ]
    • /bɔn ~ miˈluʁ ǀ mal ~ piˈjuʁ/
    Next time: another verse of Y Mal Caïra. [:D]
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    Re: Boral scratchpad - romlang

    Post by shimobaatar »

    So nice to see a new Boral thread! I'm sorry that it's taken me so long to respond to it, though. You have a wonderful and unique style of presenting things.

    My apologies in advance for how much of this will likely just be me saying how cool I think things are.

    Spoiler:
    Jackk wrote: 19 Aug 2018 22:17
    • Latin /uː/ fronted very quickly to /yː/ in Old Boral and subsequently unrounded to /iː/, and since then has been indistinguishable from descendants of Latin /i:/ (see cauçur).
    There's so much that I love about the aesthetic of Boral, both in terms of orthography and phonology, but this change here might be one of my favorites.
    Jackk wrote: 19 Aug 2018 22:17
    • […] passað proism [paˌsaθ ˈpʁoj.zm̩] […]
    [+1]
    Jackk wrote: 20 Aug 2018 15:50
    • Complete loss of schwa and schwi in all contexts with sporadic compensatory lengthening
    This is off-topic, but "schwi"? That's great! Is it another name for the barred-i?
    Jackk wrote: 20 Aug 2018 20:35 Waterfalls and châteaux: a case study
    Ah, cool! I think I remember reading about this on Discord.
    Jackk wrote: 21 Aug 2018 14:26 Y Catr Saçon
    1. hiern "winter"
      [jɛɐ̯n] - descends directly from Lt. hibernus. Note that it retains the final [n], as in jorn [ʒɔɐ̯n] "daytime", as opposed to Fr. hiver, jour.
    2. prinveir "spring"
      [pʁɪɱˈviɐ̯] - from VLt. primavera, literally "first spring", since vera had shifted in meaning to "summer". Cognates include Rom. primăvară and Occit. primver.
    3. stað "summer"
      [staθ] - like Fr. été, descending ultimately from Lt. aestatem, through intermediate estað. The initial <e> was lost when Boral lost all initial <e> before sC sequences; those which had previously been added in front of VL sC- and those which had always been there.
    4. harvest "autumn"
      [hɑɐ̯ˈvɛs(t)] - a borrowing from Old English hærfest with the same meaning. This is an example of a word which reintroduced the phoneme /h/ into Boral after it had been lost in Proto-Romance. Note that in some dialects (predominantly Northeastern) the word is instead haust, either a later reduction of harvest or a direct borrowing from Old Norse haustr.
    Everything about these words is lovely!
    Jackk wrote: 24 Aug 2018 15:01 […] 1969.
    […] 1969.
    How would this be pronounced? How are the names of years, so to speak, constructed?
    Jackk wrote: 24 Aug 2018 15:01
    • allunið - past participle of allunir "to land on the moon", an uncommon, technical or jocular verb formed by comparison with atterrir "to land", itself a compound of a "to" + ter "ground" + -ir. See also alluniscag "lunar landing", which is somewhat more common.
    [+1]
    Jackk wrote: 25 Aug 2018 12:10
    • We have the spelling ogt instead of oit (for what seem to be purely æsthetic grounds on the part of mediæval scribes). Compare noit "night".
    [+1]
    Jackk wrote: 25 Aug 2018 12:10 onç doç treç catorç cinqueç deissei setteç deisogt deinouf veint
    [ɔnʦ dɔʦ tʁɛʦ kaˈtɔɐ̯ʦ ʦɪŋˈkwɛʦ diˈsi seˈtɛʦ diˈzojt diˈnuf vin(t)]

    Notes:
    • Note the alternation of the two strategies: from Lt. -decem and deis- as a transparent later derivation. Like many Romance language a mix of the two forms ends up prevailing, although the details of which number uses which strategy are unique to Boral.
    This is really cool! Was there anything in particular that inspired this?
    Jackk wrote: 26 Aug 2018 11:26 Un Poem Cort - Y Lunnair
    Jackk wrote: 01 Sep 2018 16:02 Un Poem Cort - a deeper look
    Wow! Excellent work!
    Jackk wrote: 27 Aug 2018 13:48 ogtent
    [ojˈtɛnt]
    What, no catr-veint? [:P]
    Jackk wrote: 18 Sep 2018 16:16 Un theorem fondamental
    Jackk wrote: 20 Sep 2018 14:50 L'Œculux - Electromagnetic Radiation
    I'm afraid you've gone a little over my head here, but all of this still looks very cool, even if I don't understand it to the same degree you do! In any case, hooray for <œ>!
    Jackk wrote: 20 Sep 2018 14:50 In my head, the existence of Borland (Isr Boral) leads to an alternate history with major divergences occurring after around 500CE. Thus, technical terms such as "electromagnetic radiation" will have different analogues and therefore different derivations.
    Oh, very interesting! I don't think I realized that the world of Boral was different from our own apart from the existence of one island!
    Jackk wrote: 22 Sep 2018 13:20
    • The -scon element is equivalent to the ordinal scon "second" < Lt. secundus, part of the short order prim, scon, tarç, etc. as compared to the long order primair, doussem, treissem, etc.
    Good idea!
    Jackk wrote: 24 Sep 2018 17:25
    • al - wing. Direct descendant of Lt. āla with the same meaning. Unfortunately my brain insists on reading this word as to the due to contamination from other Romance languages [:D], so I do a double-take every time I get to this word.
    Haha, definitely understandable!
    Jackk wrote: 26 Sep 2018 14:16
    • palæochthon - prehistoric. A Greek neologism, from παλαιός - palaiós "old" and χθών - khthon "earth, soil".
    [+1]
    Jackk wrote: 30 Sep 2018 15:17 Boral has a rather unique way of forming the regular comparative of adjectives, taking the descendant of the Latin superlative -issimus. The usual form is -essem:

    […]

    The superlative has the same form but is used with the definite article.
    Cool! Was there any particular inspiration for this?
    I hope to see more in the future if you're still interested in continuing the thread!
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    Re: Boral scratchpad - romlang

    Post by Jackk »

    shimobaatar wrote: 03 Nov 2018 03:59 I hope to see more in the future if you're still interested in continuing the thread!
    Thank you for saying such nice things! [<3]
    I definitely plan on writing more eventually - probably after this uni term finishes in a few weeks.
    I'll respond to your questions layer when I am more awake. [:D]
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    Re: Boral scratchpad - romlang

    Post by Jackk »

    shimobaatar wrote: 03 Nov 2018 03:59 This is off-topic, but "schwi"? That's great! Is it another name for the barred-i?
    Yes it is - I think I first saw it used somewhere in a description of English phonology :D Probably something about the Rosa's roses merger.
    shimobaatar wrote: 03 Nov 2018 03:59 How would this be pronounced? How are the names of years, so to speak, constructed?
    Excellent question! (When I was learning French, large numbers were like one of the last things to become fluent [:D] )

    1969 would be, um
    mil nouf cent seisent nouf
    or
    deinouf (cent) seisent nouf
    with the latter being more informal (especially without the cent.
    shimobaatar wrote: 03 Nov 2018 03:59 [re: numbers 11-20] This is really cool! Was there anything in particular that inspired this?
    Mostly just that French and Spanish have slightly different cutoffs for when the pattern switches, so I figured I could get away with a it of irregularity here - and honestly I just didn't really like how *seç looked for "sixteen" :P
    shimobaatar wrote: 03 Nov 2018 03:59 Oh, very interesting! I don't think I realized that the world of Boral was different from our own apart from the existence of one island!
    Well - the history angle is extremely vague for now (and for the forseeable future), so I don't know much of anything about the details of this timeline, but for a taste, here are some of the modern-day countries nearby to Isr Boral "Borland":

    Marcater
    Goineð
    Norðhumbar
    Scotter
    Cantuary
    Dumnony
    Bas-Loðary
    Bretain
    Danmarc
    Horðater


    See what you make of that! :D
    shimobaatar wrote: 03 Nov 2018 03:59 [re: superlatives] Cool! Was there any particular inspiration for this?
    I reckoned I could justify Boral retaining this, being as it is on an island at the edge of the Romance-speaking zone. But to be frank I really just didn't like the word plu very much. [B)] It made it in anyway, but as an adverb meaning "no more, no longer" and in reduced from as pu "but".

    Again, thanks for the feedback!
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    Re: Boral scratchpad - romlang

    Post by shimobaatar »

    Thanks for your responses!
    Jackk wrote: 03 Nov 2018 20:33 Mostly just that French and Spanish have slightly different cutoffs for when the pattern switches, so I figured I could get away with a it of irregularity here - and honestly I just didn't really like how *seç looked for "sixteen" :P
    Jackk wrote: 03 Nov 2018 20:33 I reckoned I could justify Boral retaining this, being as it is on an island at the edge of the Romance-speaking zone. But to be frank I really just didn't like the word plu very much. [B)] It made it in anyway, but as an adverb meaning "no more, no longer" and in reduced from as pu "but".
    Completely valid reasoning! [:D]
    shimobaatar wrote: 03 Nov 2018 03:59 Well - the history angle is extremely vague for now (and for the forseeable future), so I don't know much of anything about the details of this timeline, but for a taste, here are some of the modern-day countries nearby to Isr Boral "Borland":

    Marcater
    Goineð
    Norðhumbar
    Scotter
    Cantuary
    Dumnony
    Bas-Loðary
    Bretain
    Danmarc
    Horðater


    See what you make of that! :D
    Oh, wow! Hmm, let's see:

    Mercia?
    Gwynedd?
    Northumbria
    Scottland
    Canterbury/Kent?
    Dumnonia/Cornwall?
    Lower Somewhere?
    Brittany
    Denmark
    ???
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    Re: Boral scratchpad - romlang

    Post by Jackk »

    (in this post OTL = our timeline)
    shimobaatar wrote: 03 Jan 2019 00:14 Mercia?
    Gwynedd?
    Northumbria
    Scottland
    Canterbury/Kent?
    Dumnonia/Cornwall?
    Lower Somewhere?
    Brittany
    Denmark
    ???
    You got all the ones you guessed, well done! [:D]
    Updating them to the most recent version of Boral we have
    Domegn Breton - British Realms:
    • Marclant < Mercia; OTL England from Cumbria down to much of East Anglia
    • Goineð < Gwynedd; OTL Wales and some of the English Midlands
    • Norð Humbr < Northumbria; much of the east of Britain from Edinburgh to the Humber
    • Scotlant < Scotland; most of OTL Scotland, the Isle of Man and some of Northern Ireland
    • Cant < Kent (Cantuaria); OTL Kent and much of the southern coast to the West (up to the Isle of Wight), along with territory across the Channel in Nord-Pas-de-Calais
    • Dumnony < Dumnonia; OTL Cornwall, Devon and much of the West Country
    Others:
    • Bas Loðran < Lotharingia; some territory from OTL Belgium, NE France and West Germany
    • Bretain < Brittania; much of NW France, having a border with Cantuary along the Channel coast
    • Danmarc < Denmark; the Jutland peninsula, the various nearby islands (f.ex. Zealand) and southern OTL Sweden
    • Horðalant < Hordaland; much of OTL Norway, the Orkneys, and the Shetlands.
    Quick (and definitely inaccurate) picture:
    Image

    (Note also the Cities of London and Paris [:D])
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    Re: Boral scratchpad - romlang

    Post by Jackk »

    Joint conjugations of aïr /eˈiʀ/ "to have" in the most recent iteration of Boral:

    Indicatif present
    j'ay; tu a; l'a
    nos eu; vos eð; il aun

    Indicatif imparfeit
    j'aye; tu aye; l'aye
    nos ayau; vos ayað; il ayen

    Passað remot
    j'au; tu au; l'au
    nos aum; vos auð; il aurn

    Futur deut
    j'array; tu arra; l'arra
    nos arreu; vos arreð; il arraun

    Soujogntif present
    j'ay; tu ay; l'ay
    nos ayau; vos ayað; il ain

    Soujogntif imparfeit
    j'aus; tu aus; l'aus
    nos ausseu; vos ausseð; il aussn
    Vars y fin meðes dy siecr setteçessem, bempart du pouvr borallesc n'ayen lettr alcun.
    /vaʀs i fɪn meˈðɛs di sjɛkʀ̩ sɛˌtɛʣɛˈsɛm | bɛmˈpaʀt di puvʀ̩ boʀaˈlɛx neˈjɛn lɛtʀ̩ alˈkɪn/
    [vɑɐ̯z i fɪn meˈðɛz di sjɛkɐ sɛtɛˈʣem | bɛmˈpɑɐ̯t di ˈpuvɐ boʀɐˈlɛç neˈʝɛn ˈlɛtʀ‿aɫˈkɪn]
    Even at the end of the seventeenth century, a good deal of the Borlish people were illiterate.

    Si l'arra surrun sy coup d'aur, tu ay bon sis nell'acconnosc hastoussem ag possibr.
    If he's about to come into money, you'd do well to get to know him as soon as possible.
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    hamteu un mont sug
    let us live in a dirty world
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