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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 23 Jun 2020 03:26
by GoshDiggityDangit
I have recently been "hired" by a friend to construct a very small language (~200 words, basic grammar) for his comic. I have been paid ¥1,000 for my future services. I am currently working on the phonology and orthographies.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 23 Jun 2020 03:42
by Parlox
10 dollars huh?

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 23 Jun 2020 04:22
by GoshDiggityDangit
Indeed $10. He makes $10 a month as his allowance.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 24 Jun 2020 00:38
by Pabappa
Tentative month names for Leaper and Poswa. From this idea. Leaper names are in dark red, Poswa in green.

month 1: Hʷalaxʷēn / Rafaempi
month 2: Xawaŋŋol / Šabiu
month 3: Kăni / Paviki
month 4: Laharil / Rapal
month 5: Namĭgi / Nabupo
month 6: Tăxa / Tašapo
month 7: Matotăhʷ / Tutšupo
month 8: Kapaŋol / Pabiu
month 9: Xʷolmilīga / Warmulla
month 10: Gaxʷixàda / Žaššižwa
month 11: Nisanḳʷanàta / Niswananta
month 12: Lanaxăhʷa / Tantšafa
month 13: Waganonā / Bamba

These names, as you might suspect, are cognates, but the Poswa names have typically added a few morphemes to the ends of the original words. Both languages are fairly conservative, but the maturation date of Poswa is more than 4,000 years after that of Leaper, so more changes have accumulated. Leaper adds a few morphemes too, mostly to the beginnings of the words.

These names are all etymologically sound, but I will probably smear them around some more. The eleventh month in particular is unlikely to keep such a long name for 3,000 years in Leaper, let alone the 7,000 years it would take for Poswa.

Also, I derived the tentative start and end days of each month, since they are based on angels' birthdays and thus highly irregular. The longest month by far is Tăxa/Tašapo, which is 56 days according to the traditional calendar. I expect to lop off quite a few days and assign them to the surrounding months, but because of the way the months are structured, I can only take away a few of these days, so this month will still be much longer than the others.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 28 Jun 2020 06:58
by kiwikami
I've been busy finishing up the academic quarter and preparing to visit the folks for the summer, but I had some time today to finally put in writing some of how nominalization and relative clauses work in Alál. There are a handful of nominalizing affixes, and attributive finite verbs (which allow relative clauses, though a kind of relative pronoun can exist in certain contexts) are formed through a combination of a nominalizer (which agrees in case with the antecedent) and an attributive verb marker (which is fused with the linking morpheme for compound verbs).

"The person saw it. The person saw the fire."
Kaîta kaıh. Kaîta haús kaıh.

"he who saw it" (AGT|OBL|PAT)
kaítmıuà | kaítmuà | kaîtmauà
 see it (active voice) + "person" NMLZ mıu|mu|màu

"the person who saw it" (AGT|OBL|PAT)
kaítámıuà kaıh | kaítámuà kaha | kaítâmauà kaúh
 see it (active voice) + attributive vŕ + "person" NMLZ mıu|mu|màu

"the person who saw the fire" (AGT|OBL|PAT)
xa·kaítámıuà haús kaıh | xa·kaítámuà haús kaha | xa·kaítâmauà haús kaúh
 benefactive · see it (active voice) + attributive vŕ + "person" NMLZ mıu|mu|màu

Patient-marked arguments in relative clauses are treated like benefactives, except that they still appear in the patientive case. The attributive marker for non-compounds, as seen above is . For compounds, it is one of vŕm, vŕk, or íu, depending on the linking morpheme (cause, result, or opposition).

"he who drowned" (AGT|OBL|PAT)
zaızmaḳalmıuà | zaızmaḳalmuà | zaızmaḳalmàuà
 drown (active voice) w/m (cause) + "person" NMLZ mıu|mu|màu

"the person who drowned" (AGT|OBL|PAT)
zaızámḳalmıuà kaıh| zaızámḳalmuà kaha | zaızámḳalmàuà kaúh
 drown (active voice) + attributive vŕm + "person" NMLZ mıu|mu|màu

"he who follows a hair-care routine" (AGT | OBL | PAT)
tıtsıılkıthıḷmıuaı | tıtsıılkıthıḷmuaı | tıtsıılkıthıḷmàu
 follow a hair-care routine (active voice) w/k (result) + "person" NMLZ mıu|mu|màu

"the person who follows a hair-care routine" (AGT | OBL | PAT)
tıtsıılíktıhıḷmıuaı | tıtsıılíktıhıḷmuaı | tıtsıılíktıhıḷmàu
 follow a hair-care routine (active voice) + attributive vŕk + "person" NMLZ mıu|mu|màu

"he whom you irrationally fear" (AGT | OBL | PAT)
aìxıtaxìtıusuxmııut | aìxıtaxìtıusuxmıut | aìxıtaxìtıusuxmàıut
 irrationally fear you (inverse voice) w/ıu (opposition) + "person" NMLZ mıu|mu|màu
 (The durative ı suffix here metathesizes with the vowels in mıu|mu|màu to produce slightly different forms.)


"the person whom you irrationally fear" (AGT | OBL | PAT)
aìxıtaxǐtıusuxmııut kaıh | aìxıtaxǐtıusuxmıut kaha | aìxıtaxǐtıusuxmàıut kaúh
 irrationally fear you (inverse voice) + attributive íu + "person" NMLZ mıu|mu|màu
 (Due to notational convention, the acute accent on íu instead shows up as a caron on the preceding ı.)


"I drowned the clown whom you used to irrationally fear. Now, it seems, you are rightfully afraid of me."
Úzaàzmaḳalàs aìxıtaxǐtıusullııxmàıut skûhakaúh. Xaùzxamsulsukluzı.

This has been something I've vaguely understood and put to use for quite a long time now, but I've never really put it on paper and tried to work out the kinks. It's nice to see a few exceedingly long multisyllabic words; Alál is quite synthetic, but in most of my examples I tend towards simpler constructions with fewer affixes. Time to pull out the ininfixfixation. Not inininfixfixfixation - as far as I can tell, that can only show up in the weirder constructions that incorporate objects with extremely specific spatial properties. (Rastattuùâtẓax ra<sta<t<tu>ù>-à>t>ẓ-à-x "I eat fish found only in the west.")

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 28 Jun 2020 13:57
by Creyeditor
kiwikami wrote:
28 Jun 2020 06:58
Rastattuùâtẓax ra<sta<t<tu>ù>-à>t>ẓ-à-x "I eat fish found only in the west."
These words are the reason I enjoy Alál.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 29 Jun 2020 16:06
by DesEsseintes
I started thinking about Híí again after not doing anything conlanging-related for two months at least.
Creyeditor wrote:
28 Jun 2020 13:57
kiwikami wrote:
28 Jun 2020 06:58
Rastattuùâtẓax ra<sta<t<tu>ù>-à>t>ẓ-à-x "I eat fish found only in the west."
These words are the reason I enjoy Alál.
I enjoy Alál for a whole host of reasons, but I concur that the incredibly specific word forms that seem to effortlessly spring into being in Kiwi’s langs are a source of much wonder and delight.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 30 Jun 2020 09:01
by kiwikami
DesEsseintes wrote:
29 Jun 2020 16:06
I started thinking about Híí again after not doing anything conlanging-related for two months at least.
Creyeditor wrote:
28 Jun 2020 13:57
I enjoy Alál for a whole host of reasons, but I concur that the incredibly specific word forms that seem to effortlessly spring into being in Kiwi’s langs are a source of much wonder and delight.
[:D] Thank y'all!

Two layers are pretty common but inininfixfixfixation shows up, as far as I can tell so far, only in cases where an incorporated object has a directional/"axis" infix which has undergone internal reduplication to indicate exclusivity - "habitually acting upon something that is oriented only in one particular direction". This is... I guess I'd call it a semi-productive construction - it doesn't show up very much, but it's amusing when it does.

"It only filters the air that one exhales."
Khıuhakukuḳaḳàhtı.
[kçɪfçǝˌgʊgʊŋǝˈɴɑçtɪ]
khu<ıv-ha<ku<~kuḳa>ḳà>h>t-ı
filter<3-breath<inwards<~EXCL>>>-DUR

"corrupt religious figure" (lit. speaker of "uninternalized"/insincere prayers)
laımıḳḳuùslamuaı
[ɬǝjmɪŋˈvosɬǝmvǝj]
la<ıv-mı<ḳ<~ḳu>ù>s>l-mu-ı-a
say<3-prayer<external<~EXCL>>>-NMLZ-DUR-VOL.ACT

"leviathan" (lit. that which sees the color(s) found only in the depths)
kakahhaahaàhtataı
[ˌkǝgǝçǝˈʝɑçtǝdǝj]
ka<ka<h<ha>a~ha>àh>t-ta-ı
see<color<below<~EXCL>~far>>-NMLZ-DUR

Parlox wrote:
22 Jun 2020 03:04
So I've been collaborating on an immersion based conlang with some others, and it's produced some truly beautiful phrases.

Pepetin'la'psal'jake'hwangkejokwakeqijakwazonurogajaloganemimu'poipoi ta’a’i.
[3RD.PLUR.two.five-NEG-??"speak language of small bloody planets"-3RD.PLUR 2ND-COM-ACC]
“Our two groups of five each will not have spoken the language of crying small bloody planets with you.”
That is beautiful!

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 30 Jun 2020 17:01
by Creyeditor
kiwikami wrote:
30 Jun 2020 09:01
"It only filters the air that one exhales."
Khıuhakukuḳaḳàhtı.
[kçɪfçǝˌgʊgʊŋǝˈɴɑçtɪ]
khu<ıv-ha<ku<~kuḳa>ḳà>h>t-ı
filter<3-breath<inwards<~EXCL>>>-DUR
Could this be nominalized to mean air conditioning?

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 30 Jun 2020 17:31
by DesEsseintes
Creyeditor wrote:
30 Jun 2020 17:01
kiwikami wrote:
30 Jun 2020 09:01
"It only filters the air that one exhales."
Khıuhakukuḳaḳàhtı.
[kçɪfçǝˌgʊgʊŋǝˈɴɑçtɪ]
khu<ıv-ha<ku<~kuḳa>ḳà>h>t-ı
filter<3-breath<inwards<~EXCL>>>-DUR
Could this be nominalized to mean air conditioning?
Or a face mask?

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 05 Jul 2020 20:50
by Parlox
I've been doing a lot of reformatting of Gondolans reference grammar, along with re-analyzing how cases work. Gondolans case system is now far, far more productive than it was. Verbs conjugations have also been revamped. I also need to entirely reformat the dictionary, I've been using google docs and a very large, very laggy table.

Gondolans reference grammar is up to 115 pages, while the lexicon is a measly 640 words (or so).

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 07 Jul 2020 00:03
by Chagen
I have been working on Pazmat infinitives which are a hilariously complicated mess whose use alongside the participles appears to be extremely scattershot. Nevermind the complete lack of passive ones--they do exist, but they're archaic and usually the once-exclusively-active infinitives are combined with a passive copular infinitive neśā. Incidentally the copula is also used for the new passive construction, with a participle; though interestingly, unlike, say, Latin, the participle does not collate with the subject of the sentence and infact appears with nothing more than an locative case marker attached to it:

tārusam neyī
hit-PTCPL.PST-LOC COP-AOR-1S
I was hit

mūcayorāsit allīt dawerīsa ḥūlaṣrītam neyantu!
prepare-PTCPl.PRES.ACT-DEF.SG-PRIV INTENS opponent-DEF.PL-ABLOC defeat-PTCPL.PST.PASS-LOC COP-AOT-1P.EXCL
We are being defeated not by our opposition but by a complete lack of preparation!

However, I have no explanation for why these sentences use participles and negative verbs use infinitives. In fact, because of that, negative passive sentences require a string of two infinitives, and if it's also e.g potential then THREE!

vanīm ḥūlayāsya kaśśāya nīyya yū
truly defeat-INFIN.PRES-ACC POT-INFIN.PRES-ACC COP-INFIN.PASS-AOR-ACC NEG.VERB-AOR-3S
She simply cannot be defeated

The only saving grace is that the first infinitive may reduce to solely -ā (in effect, being homophonous with an athematic definite singular verbal action noun, now that I think about it...". Hm. The second could too, and the potential verb is often crammed onto the first, so vanīm ḥūlayākaśśā nīyya yū would make sense, it would just be slightly informal and casual. What I gave above is what would appear in older texts and formal prose. In fact the end would be probably nīyyū and I guess I just made a passive negative verb lol

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 07 Jul 2020 20:29
by Parlox
I've been working on Gondolan some more, and at some point I realised how strange Gondolans word order is.

Essentially, it is heavily based off of Gondolans animacy hierarchy. The "higher" animacy noun is always placed before the "lower" animacy noun. The verbs placement determines the type of clause.. If the verb comes between the higher animacy noun (h) and lower animacy noun (l) it is just a general statement..

Soirse tagpêl toçi.
/ˈso͡iɻ.se ˈtag.pɛl to.ˈʀi/
3RD.FEM.ERG.SING see-PAST.PASS cat.PROX.ABS.SING
The cat saw her. (HVL word order)

While if the verb follows the lower animacy noun the clause is a sort of general irrealis clause, and if the verb isn't modified by one of a series of irrealis particles it is considered a hypothetical.

Ag soi talnakol?
/ag so͡i ˈtaʟn.a.kol/
3RD.MASC.ERG 3RD.FEM.ABS see-FUT.GNOM
What if he saw her? (HLV word order)

If two nouns are of similiar or the same animacy an SVO word order is preferred, but if the difference is high than an OVS word order is preferred where the O is the higher animacy noun and the S is the lower animacy one.

Mäseth talnevos toçivún
/mɑ.ˈseθ ˈtaʟn.e.vos to.ˈʀi.vuːn/
king.PROX.ABS see-PAST.PRF cat-OBV.ERG-DEF
The cat saw the king

So far VHL clauses are ungrammatical, but I might do something with them later.

Note that while Gondolan essentially has a mixed word order, SVO/HVL. Neither alone properly describe how nouns are treated in a clause, as HVL clauses tend to the SVO order but can be in the OVS order when a clause's nouns have a large difference in animacy.