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Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 18 Jul 2020 15:02
by Pabappa
Icecap Moonshine

pàṭēy "wife" (pàt "wife" + ʷ-hēy "woman")
tadoh "husband" (tá "husband" + noh "man")

This is an extremely high-maintenance language, such that it's taken more work on my part to churn out just these two words than it would for me to add another hundred words to Poswa, even assuming that I worked out the etymologies carefully to ensure they didn't collide with anything. I'm starting to give in to pressure, and my future work on Icecap Moonshine might be not quite so perfectionist, ... if I start calling it something else it's my way of saying I'm working with a draft of the language rather than an immutable part of the final product.

edit: and this makes the word for queen poṣēy, which is funny to me because in the earliest form of Moonshine it was something like āda, which reminds me of Ada Posey, a name I knew back then from https://www.c-span.org/person/?adaposey .

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 19 Jul 2020 19:05
by KaiTheHomoSapien
I made a decision that laryngeals can be syllabic in Lihmelinyan; it's just very rare. They can also follow stop consonants, something I initially disallowed:

ethuént /ɛt.'xʷɛnt/ (an ugly-sounding word if there ever was one) "they attacked", from téhumi - "I attack"

As is the case in -u- stem athematic verbs, the u becomes wé in the plural, e.g. tehuémen "we attack"

(Spelling conventions dictate that xʷ is always spelled <hu>)

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 20 Jul 2020 10:44
by DesEsseintes
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote:
19 Jul 2020 19:05
ethuént /ɛt.'xʷɛnt/ (an ugly-sounding word if there ever was one)
I happen to think it sounds really nice. [:D]

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 26 Jul 2020 02:57
by Parlox
In the past few days, I've done a lot with Gondolan. All kinds of clauses and stuff, derivational morphology, and I've fixed a lot of issues that apparently have existed for some time without being noticed. That said, Gondolans' reference grammar now has 171 pages!

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 27 Jul 2020 01:19
by Linguifex
I redid the sound changes connecting Tim Ar and Proto-O—that is, the sound changes that derive them from Proto-Tim Ar-O. Still need to work on the Proto-O changes some more…

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 01 Aug 2020 15:19
by Khemehekis
Bob wrote:
18 Jul 2020 08:04
Khemehekis wrote:
17 Jul 2020 10:41
Who wants to guess what song I translated?
[:D] No idea. Bulletproof Nothing to Lose Fire Away song? :?:
You mean "Titanium" by David Guetta and Sia? No, that's not it.

Hint #1: It contains most of the words in that post.

Hint #2: It was released as a single, but never made the Top 100 on the Billboard chart.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 01 Aug 2020 23:50
by littlesalmon
I wrote my first ever poem in itota itiko. Unfortunately, I do not have the resolve to gloss it all, but there is a translation here. Concerning the stress: it nearly always falls on the first vowel, and the only exception here is the second word.
The rhythmic structure is a mess, but I still like it.

Original:
Spoiler:

ala talo. kati kata
nanomita ji ji ta ji·
ilomi vo pa taja.
ilapi laji taja kata.
ilaki kati miti taja lata
isa.
imali jisa so jisa so tasa so jisa.
alani pa taja itota ma.
miti taja ilapi alani pa
taja.
laji taja lata·
ilaki itota itota ma.
Translated:
Spoiler:

Light blue light. It is
493 nanometers
(I'm not really sure);
Yet I like it.
It makes me remember water.

There's a 3, a 3, a 4 and a 3 (note: lang uses base 5).
I don't perceive them.
I remember, but I don't perceive.

I like water;
This was causing everything.

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 02 Aug 2020 05:53
by elemtilas
littlesalmon wrote:
01 Aug 2020 23:50
I wrote my first ever poem in itota itiko.
Yay! Invented language poetry!

Have you considered any of the mechanics of poetry in this language that you'd care to describe?

Re: What did you accomplish today?

Posted: 02 Aug 2020 15:21
by littlesalmon
Not deliberately and not before writing this poem, but it coalesced into something while I was writing.

Basically, constancy of line length isn't always adhered to: if there are minor length changes between lines, some words can go entirely unstressed so that there is an equal number of stressed syllables in them, and one-word lines exist; also poems almost never have a simple rhyme scheme. However, any word that appeared at the end of a line must rhyme with another one (preferably at the end of a different line), and additional internal rhymes are strongly encouraged.

Rhymes I can't quite figure out how to explain but, for example, moni /'moni/ and mono /'mono/ would rhyme, as would moni and soni /'soni/, but moni and sono would be considered an imperfect rhyme, and moni and monika /'monika/ wouldn't rhyme at all; ilakita /'ilaki,ta/ would perfectly rhyme with akini pa /'akini 'ta/, but not with akini pa /'akini 'pa/, and ila ta /'ila 'ta/ would be the same (with these exact words/phrases too).