Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

A forum for all topics related to constructed languages
Mecejide
rupestrian
rupestrian
Posts: 16
Joined: 08 Jul 2020 21:04

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

Post by Mecejide »

Iača:
/m n ɳ/ <m n ň>
/p b t d ʈ ɖ k g/ <p b t d ť ď k g>
/f v s z ʂ ʐ/ <f v s z š ž>
/ts dz ʈʂ ɖʐ/ <c x č x̌>
/l ɭ j w/ <l ľ j w>
/i u/ <i u>
/e o/ <e o>
/a ɒ/ <a y>

User avatar
eldin raigmore
korean
korean
Posts: 5595
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 19:38
Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

Post by eldin raigmore »

Porphyrogenitos wrote:
11 Jul 2020 03:28
....
I had a brief speculation about a sesquisyllabic-type language in which the inventory of not only vowel contrasts but also consonants is smaller in the sesquisyllable, e.g.:
....
Main syllables may take the maximal structure CGVC; sesquisyllables may at most have the structure CV. The distinction between plain voiceless, aspirated voiceless, and voiced oral occlusives is neutralized in sesquisyllables and in the coda of the main syllable. Sesquisyllables may only have the vowels /i ə u/; high vowels in sesquisyllables are the product of historic glides being syllabified after the deletion of the main vowel - historical vowels in sesquisyllables were reduced to an epenthetic schwa.
I think you’re misusing the prefix sesqui-.
Sesqui- means -and-a-half.
A sesquicentennial occurs every century-and-a-half.
A sesquiterpene is a terpene-and-a-half.
A sesquipedalian word is a foot-and-a-half long.
And so on.

So a sesquisyllable should be one-and-a-half syllables.

What you’re describing might better be termed semi-syllables.

User avatar
Creyeditor
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3928
Joined: 14 Aug 2012 19:32

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

Post by Creyeditor »

The idea is sesquisyllabic languages is that words consist of 1.5 syllables, a main syllable and a non-main syllable.
Creyeditor
"Thoughts are free."
Produce, Analyze, Manipulate
1 :deu: 2 :eng: 3 :idn: 4 :fra: 4 :esp:
:con: Ook & Omlűt & Nautli languages & Sperenjas
[<3] Papuan languages, Morphophonology, Lexical Semantics [<3]

User avatar
qwed117
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3775
Joined: 20 Nov 2014 02:27

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

Post by qwed117 »

the term typically used is “minor syllable” (and “major syllable”). This specific arrangement with limited vowels reminds me of a language I made a couple years ago where minor syllables are limited to [C/(C)[R/V]] and only allow the vowels /a i/ in those syllables
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

User avatar
eldin raigmore
korean
korean
Posts: 5595
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 19:38
Location: SouthEast Michigan

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

Post by eldin raigmore »

@qwed117
@Creyeditor
@Porphyrogenitos

Oh! The word is a-syllable-and-a-half long! Not the syllable is half-again as long as a usual syllable!

Sorry for misunderstanding!

....

About major and minor syllables:

What if trimoraic superheavy syllables and/or primarily-stressed syllables were of maximal shape
(C(C))V(V)((C)C)
and bimoraic heavy syllables and/or secondarily-stressed syllables were of maximal shape
(C(C))V(C)
and monomoraic light syllables and/or unstressed syllables were of maximal shape
(C)V
?

The CCVVCC syllables would be major;
the (C)V syllables would be minor;
and the CCVC syllables would be medium;
right?

Especially if only schwas were allowed as vowels in unstressed syllables?

Or am I missing the point?

Post Reply