Lexember 2020

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spanick
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by spanick »

qwed117 wrote: 14 Dec 2020 05:36 Weekly Wrap Up

spanick:
Spoiler:
spanick wrote: 10 Dec 2020 05:01 Fell waaaay behind so here’s a bunch of entries form Yemya to catch up.

śaus /ɕaus/ (n.) ‘ear’ from PIE *h₂ṓws; like ‘eye’ there remains a fossilized dual form śuśa.

śtonth /ɕtontʰ/ (n.) ‘tooth’ from PIE *h₃dónts.

jostha /ʝostʰɑ/ (n.) ‘hand’ from PIE *ǵʰóstos.

śvaithatoru /ɕʋaitʰɑtoru/ (n.) ‘poplar tree’ from PIE *ḱweytós ‘white’ plus *dóru ‘tree’.
I really really like these four words. I would never have thought 'śvaithatoru' would be cognate to English "white tree', given just the word and the definition. It really goes to show how interesting of a character Yemya has taken on.
Just wanted to say, thank you for taking the time to do this. I’m sure I speak for everyone when I say that it’s nice to get a little feedback during Lexember and know that people enjoy something of what we’re doing.

As I read your feedback, I realized that I had written the wrong definition for śvaithatora, which actually means ‘birch’ and should make the “white tree” translation make more sense.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

I fell behind a little bit with the weekend, but here we go!

Lexember 12th - Yélian

vástia [ˈvastɪ̯ɐ] - wilderness
Etymology: From vast "wild" + location suffix -ia
Edit: I just realized that in my dictionary on my work laptop the word didn't exist, but in my dictionary on my home PC there was already a word
for wilderness, vastesme. Well, synonyms are great, aren't they?
Lexember 13th - Yélian

pènamo [ˈpɛnɐmo] - step brother
Etymology: pè- "step" + namo "brother". The "pè" part is the new invention for this lexember entry and derives from the preposition pés "towards", literally "towardsbrother", as this new connection was formed from the connection of different families.
USAGE NOTES: Other family relations derive with the same prefix as well, including pènemia "step sister" and pèméva "step mother". However, the word for "step father" is different.

Lexember 14th - Yélian

quepèno [kəˈpɛnɔ̈] - step father
cepèno [kəˈpɛno] - step father
Etymology: from quet "new" + pèno "father"
USAGE NOTES: The word used to be very derogatory, similar to "bastard" in English (but the other way round), but with the liberalisation of the Yélian society it became a quite neutral word.

Pèmbat yityèsai pès vástia fecun pènamo è quepèno, reo mèva yaipústbit èpa ciyityafecuret.
[ˈpɛmbɐt ɕɨˈt͡ʃɛsaɪ̯ pɛs ˈvastɪ̯ɐ ˈɸeːkʉn ˈpɛnɐmo ɛ kəˈpɛno, ˈɾeː.o ˈmeːʋɐ ʃaɪ̯ˈpusbɨt ɛpa kɨɕɨt͡ʃɐɸəˈkuːɪ̯ət]
last_weekend PST-spend_a_nice_day_outside-1SG towards wilderness with step_brother and step_father, 1SG.POSS mother PST-sick-COP.3SG.ANIM and NEG-PST-POT-tag_along-3SG
Last weekend I took an outing to the wilderness with my step brother and step father. My mother was sick and couldn't join.

Bonus words :esp:

prometido, prometida [pɾomeˈtiðo] - fiancé
hermanastro, hermanastra [eɾmaˈnastɾa] - half brother, half sister
hacer un favor (a alguien) - to do (so.) a favor
Last edited by Iyionaku on 14 Dec 2020 19:00, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Davush »

qwed117 wrote: 14 Dec 2020 05:36 Weekly Wrap Up
Like Week 1, I'm just gonna give some appreciative comments to everyone who participated in Week 2 (by order of first participation). I'm a bit strapped for time because I had a test earlier today, so I apologize if I missed someone or if my comments seem a bit rushed.
Thank you for taking the time to do this! I'm sure it is much appreciated by everyone.

13 & 14

min- 'to grow, cultivate' (Inflectional stems: ming-, minz-, minr-)

tanosa flower (OBL: tanoase)

saka(s) field (some nouns have a fleeting /s/ which only reappears in the oblique. Saka : Sakase).

Minrian tanosa saka heare
cultivate-IRR-1sg-3sg flower field that-OBL
'I will cultivate flowers in that field'

Note: it is common for plural nouns to show singular agreement when they aren't specific. Plural marking is more common, or required, when the plural-referent is more definite.

I.e. Minrinea tanosa 'I will cultivate the (specific) flowers (which you gave me/told me about/etc.)
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DesEsseintes
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by DesEsseintes »

I should start posting again so I can be included in Qwed’s weekly wrap-ups.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

qwed117 wrote: 14 Dec 2020 05:36 Weekly Wrap Up
Like Week 1, I'm just gonna give some appreciative comments to everyone who participated in Week 2 (by order of first participation). I'm a bit strapped for time because I had a test earlier today, so I apologize if I missed someone or if my comments seem a bit rushed.

shimobaatar:
Spoiler:
shimobaatar wrote: 12 Dec 2020 03:25 Day 11

Gán Vẽi (Entry 11):

/si˥˧/
Classifier:
1. livestock
2. pets
3. (informal) any non-threatening animal, especially a mammal

Etymology
From Old TBD siʔ "livestock, domesticated animals", from Proto-TBD *sit "to live; animal".
Usage notes
Classifiers are most often placed between numerals and nouns. was originally used only to count sheep, cattle, and other kinds of livestock, but is now commonly used to count pets and domesticated animals in general. Colloquially, any medium-sized, non-threatening animal may be counted using .

Example sentence:
Kâi sì rả ye nái phânh hō.
/kaj˦˥˧ si˥˧ ɻa˨˩˨ je˧ naj˩˧ pʰaɲ˦˥˧ ho˥/
[kaj˦˥˧ siː˥˧ ɻaː˨˩˨ ʝeː˧ n̪aj˩˧ p͡ɸãɲ˦˥˧ ɦoː˥]
kâi=sì rả ye nái=phânh=hō
two=livestock.CL sheep PROX 1s.PROG=wool=DIR
I am shearing these two sheep.
First I gotta say, it really cool that you're juggling both Thedish and Gan Vei. Second, I was reading this and realized that I had completely forgotten about classifiers in the Hlai-like A Priori, and the Hlai-lang A Posteriori. It's cool that you're really making this language work together. It feels authentic, and "real".
Shemtov:
Spoiler:
Shemtov wrote: 09 Dec 2020 06:34 Day 8:
Maillys: Cuhyuthyĺ-Ćá "Chewing Tea"- a form of tea similiar to IRL White Tea, but meant to be chewed, taken at tea-chewing breaks, and when boiling is impractical. Cuhyuthyl was originally tobacco, which was exclusively chewed, with tea drunk at meals, but when it was realized that tea could be prepared as a chew, the Maill slowly phased out tobacco so they could rely on their tea crop, and not have to plant tobacco.
Interesting etymology for the Maillys word, It's very interesting that the Maill transitioned form tobacco usage to tea usage.
Iyionaku:
Spoiler:
Iyionaku wrote: 07 Dec 2020 11:26 Lexember 6th and 7th - Yélian

yitármiku [ɕɨˈtaɾmikʉ] - celery, fennel
Etymology: from yitár "star" + miku "leek", literally "star leek"

USAGE NOTES: Note that Yélian uses the same word for celery and fennel, as both plants weren't native to Yélians. If you need to differentiate, you'd propably call the latter yitármikuzali "sweet star leek"
This is really cool, and the literal name "star leek" reminds me of English's "star anise" and similar weird naming of plants.
KaiTheHomoSapien:
Spoiler:
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 12 Dec 2020 18:07 10th

sórgīn - masc. - valley

A sórgīn (pronounced /'sɔr.çiːn/) is a wide, open valley (cf. Lihmelinyan sárgēn) as opposed to a small or narrow river valley. The "Vale of Arculis" from which the region of Arculy derives its name is natively called the Sórgīn Arkuleís.

11th

álgāti - ā-stem. v. - to snow

Because this is a weather verb, there are no 1st and 2nd person forms, just like titāti - it rains. (This verb has a remnant of the i-reduplication present stem. Arculese has lost the stem distinctions that Lihmelinyan has, so this is archaic and the reduplication is maintained throughout the entire paradigm).

12th

andílā - fem. - rabbit, hare

The word for this animal, an important symbol of the Kingdom of Manter, has similar reflexes in every Mantian language. In Lihmelinyan, the word is masculine, but it's been reanalyzed as a feminine in Arculese. The /d/ is a result of an original unaspirated /t/ in the proto-language.

Should note that in general, Arculese has a much better-defined feminine gender than Lihmelinyan, in which the feminine is marginal and partly derivational.
I really like the appearance of all these words, especially andílā. I also love hearing about how you're developing Arculese, the different reduplication stems, the -nth suffix, and the feminine gender.
Dormouse559:
Spoiler:
Dormouse559 wrote: 10 Dec 2020 22:50 10 lexembre - Iluhsa

zèiti [ˈzɛi̯.ti] n - olive (< *zaite)
zeitézza [zei̯ˈtezza] n/adj - olive oil (< *zaite + *-enza "product of")

Ziburórmi zeitišimza?
[zibuˈrormi zei̯tiˈʃimza]
zé-buróm-r zèit-i<šim>ra
INT-eat.PFT-2S.NOM olive-PL.ABS<1S.GEN>

Did you eat my olives?
I love the word zèite. It reminds me of learning the word 'aceite' in Spanish class when talking about food items. Like 'aceite de oliva', olive oil (which came up surprisingly often).
silvercat:
Spoiler:
silvercat wrote: 08 Dec 2020 05:44 Catching up

Here are some of the inflecting verbs in Tynthna

4 tuthav - have / hold
5 charuv - feel (with hands, skin, etc)
6 tarov - grow, get larger, expand
7 tramuv - walk, crawl
I really like the aesthetic of this language, and the words. I can't wait to see more of Tyntha this month, and hopefully at other times.
Jackk:
Spoiler:
Jackk wrote: 13 Dec 2020 00:44 12m Lexembr
short excerpt from Milda ver Ragner’s 1954 popular history Grex Byd: Kyvarvod y Vaωr Morωn (A Girdled World: The Great Borunesk Meeting), a popular account of the 1517 coming together of people from around the world on the island of Borune [Borneo], and the sequence of events that led up to it.
…this commonly-held misconception. In fact, more than a dozen crewmembers of mac Kellot’s Phœbos had at least some Arabic; the British and Morrack mercantile domains had overlapped in Gaul and Spain for nearly two centuries at this point. At least two were entirely fluent writers, if not speakers—al-Hamid’s book of circular functions was as yet untranslated in Latin and was an invaluable navigational aid.

So it is almost impossible to imagine the height of emotion on al-Kazmi’s Cynthia as, having travelled further west than anyone in quite possibly the history of humanity, arrived at last in Muharram 924 somewhere almost familiar. Following the stories they heard (in Arabic: much of the island had converted to Islam over the previous few decades, with continual trade from Muslim India) of the map-makers from the Far West, they travelled along the coast to the port city of Sinquan.

There at last they united with the Welsh explorers, shouting the immortal line across the bay; O Gastor ‘ila Bolux! “From Castor to Pollux!”, in a reference to the celestial twins of Greek myth. Or at least, mac Kellot’s first mate calls out this line in the 1927 film adaptation One Day in Borune—the thought is pleasing enough that it does no harm to assume the meeting really did start so poetically. Awkwardly, al-Kazmi’s otherwise-impeccable logbook is missing the vital few pages surrounding this date…
There's always a lot to love about Boral, but I really enjoy reading the Boralverse snippets and stories. They're really cool and interesting to think about.
Thank you! Your appreciation is appreciated [<3]
14m Lexembr
coglt /ˈkɔjlt/ [ˈkɔ.jʊt] (literally) collected, composed, assorted; (of a person) collected, presentable, put-together
< the past participle of coglir “to gather, pick up, collect”, which comes via Old Boral coȝlir /koˈʎir/ from Latin colligō “I gather, draw, assemble, harvest”. Used of people in its modern senses since the seventeenth century. In the late 19th century it was briefly used as a general positive adjective but this had gone out of fashion even by the time of the Millstone War.

Y Deviant spornaurn majortaðer accostur “coglt”.
For the most part, the Deviants rejected “presentable” clothing.
/i deˈvjant spɔrˈno.rn̩ maˌʒɔr.taˈðɛr ˌa.kɔsˈtɪr kɔjlt/
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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Shemtov
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Shemtov »

qwed117 wrote: 14 Dec 2020 05:36



Shemtov:
Spoiler:
Shemtov wrote: 09 Dec 2020 06:34 Day 8:
Maillys: Cuhyuthyĺ-Ćá "Chewing Tea"- a form of tea similiar to IRL White Tea, but meant to be chewed, taken at tea-chewing breaks, and when boiling is impractical. Cuhyuthyl was originally tobacco, which was exclusively chewed, with tea drunk at meals, but when it was realized that tea could be prepared as a chew, the Maill slowly phased out tobacco so they could rely on their tea crop, and not have to plant tobacco.
Interesting etymology for the Maillys word, It's very interesting that the Maill transitioned form tobacco usage to tea usage.
What happened was that they transferred from cocoa to tea, due to the limited area of cacao growth in their new territory, and fermented tea replaced fermented cacao's sacred status. Tobacco was also a sacrament when sun-dried (as opposed to smoke-dried). When some Maill began using Chewing Tobacco cut with Chewing Tea if they could not boil tea, people began to transition to Tobacco-only-as-sacrament, and thus it was grown only on temple grounds, whereupon the name changed to something meaning "Temple-Leaf" or "Divine-Leaf" instead of the original "Cuhyuthyl"

On that note:
Day 13:
Maillys: Béllyn "To brew [tea]"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Cuēiṭlon "To boil"

Day 14:
Maillys: Ádharr "Tea Kettle"
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Ātatl "Cocoa serving vessel"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
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spanick
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by spanick »

Day 14

Yemya

vasthuyatś /ʋɑstʰujɑt͡ɕ/ (v.) ‘to live, dwell, reside’ formed from vasthu ‘house’ (see Day 13 post) plus -yatś which forms verbs and is ultimately from PIE *(é)-yeti.

vasthujena /ʋɑstʰuʝenɑ/ (n.) ‘family, extended family, clan’ from vasthu ‘house’ and jena‘clan, blood relatives, people’ from PIE *ǵénh₁os (cf. Latin genus; Greek γένος; Sanskrit जनस्).

jena /ʝenɑ/ (n.) 'clan, blood relatives, people; category, class' is similar but distinct from laudj /laud͡ʝ/ (n.) 'people' from PIE *h₁léwdʰis (cf. German Leute). The former implies some sort of relationship between the people in question and the latter is more general, referring to people in general, without reference to their relationships.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by silvercat »

qwed117 wrote: 14 Dec 2020 05:36 Weekly Wrap Up
Like Week 1, I'm just gonna give some appreciative comments to everyone who participated in Week 2 (by order of first participation). I'm a bit strapped for time because I had a test earlier today, so I apologize if I missed someone or if my comments seem a bit rushed.

silvercat:
Spoiler:
silvercat wrote: 08 Dec 2020 05:44 Catching up

Here are some of the inflecting verbs in Tynthna

4 tuthav - have / hold
5 charuv - feel (with hands, skin, etc)
6 tarov - grow, get larger, expand
7 tramuv - walk, crawl
I really like the aesthetic of this language, and the words. I can't wait to see more of Tyntha this month, and hopefully at other times.
Thanks! I'm once again behind and I have too many languages that I keep switching between, but Tythna is a special one that I need to do more with.
my pronouns: they/them or e/em/eirs/emself
Main conlang: Ŋyjichɯn. Other conlangs: Tsɑkø (naming language), Ie, Tynthna, Maanxmuʃt, Ylialis
All my conlangs
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 14th
jong3 /ɕoŋ˧˩/ n home
zha'1-ang2 /t͡sʰaʔ˧aŋ˥/ v to live (somewhere)


*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
dˀumt- v. to build based on 'home', since Latin DOMUS is from PIE *dem- to build; I already have koh₂s₁- 'home'

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
θaːyʔ˦˨ n 'vegetable' from Proto-Northwest Central Hlai *saːyʔ, cf. Cunhua tθaː(y)3, Nadouhua fay3

Sardinian
frútura nf 'fruit (for eating)' from Latin *FRŪCTULA, cf. Gallurese frútula,

Candho drimpit*, sa frútura est durche.
When it ripens, the fruit is sweet.

Cool word; probably gonna be subject of tomorrow's Lexember.

spanick wrote: 14 Dec 2020 06:17 Just wanted to say, thank you for taking the time to do this. I’m sure I speak for everyone when I say that it’s nice to get a little feedback during Lexember and know that people enjoy something of what we’re doing.

As I read your feedback, I realized that I had written the wrong definition for śvaithatora, which actually means ‘birch’ and should make the “white tree” translation make more sense.
When I read the definition, I thought of white poplars, so I might have missed it even with "birch". But etymologies are always a hard thing to expect, so I wouldn't be too worried.
Last edited by qwed117 on 16 Dec 2020 02:36, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 14

Gán Vẽi (Entry 14):

trẽi /ʈ͡ʂej˧˩/ (inanimate or animate)
Noun:
1. rot, decay, putrefaction, decomposition
2. rotten or rotting matter
3. mold
4. sepsis, necrosis, gangrene, infection
5. ruin, disrepair
trẽi /ʈ͡ʂej˧˩/ (comparative trẽi ma /ʈ͡ʂej˧˩ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. rotten, decayed, putrefied, decomposed
2. rotting, decaying, putrefying, decomposing  
3. moldy
4. septic, necrotic, gangrenous, badly infected, putrefactive
5. ruined, ruinous, dilapidated, deteriorated, run-down, neglected, abandoned, derelict
6. (informal, vulgar) damn, damned, cursed, accursed, confounded, bloody, godforsaken, g*ddamn, f***ing
7. (informal, vulgar) bad, awful, lousy, cheap, crappy, sh***y
trẽi /ʈ͡ʂej˧˩/ (causative xā trẽi /ɕa˥ ʈ͡ʂej˧˩/)
Verb:
1. to rot, to decay, to putrefy, to decompose
2. to go bad (of food)
3. to fester, to become septic, to become necrotic, to become gangrenous, to become infected, to worsen (of a medical condition)
4. to fall into a state of disrepair, to deteriorate, to be neglected, to be abandoned
trẽi /ʈ͡ʂej˧˩/
Interjection:
1. (informal, vulgar) damn, damnit, g*ddamnit, crap, sh**, f***

Etymology
From Old TBD drêêh "to rot, to decay", from Proto-TBD *da "bad, evil, dangerous" + *rees "to leave, to depart, to disappear, to die".
Usage notes
The noun may be treated as animate in order to emphasize the spread of the rot or mold in question, but this is rare.
The interjection and Senses 6-7 of the adjective are likely to be considered only mildly vulgar by the majority of speakers, although this may vary by age group and region.

Example sentence:
Ngẻi ye trẽi vǐ hō, nhěu!
/ŋej˨˩˨ je˧ ʈ͡ʂej˧˩ vi˧˨˧ ho˥ | ɲew˧˨˧/
[ŋʲɛj˨˩˨ ʝeː˧ ʈ͡ʂɛj˧˩ ʋiː˧˨˧ ɦoː˥ | ɲɛw˧˨˧]
ngẻi ye trẽi vǐ=hō, nhěu
pepper PROX rot seem=DIR, sister
This pepper's gone bad, ma'am!

Thedish (Entry 14):

huyale /ˈhœʏ̯ˌaːl/ (plural huyales /ˈhœʏ̯ˌaːl(ə)s/)
Noun:
1. wedding reception, wedding party, wedding celebration
2. wedding, wedding ceremony
3. (rare) marriage, the state of being married
4. (figurative) the joining of two or more things

Alternative forms
huyael, huyalt (pl.), huyalet (pl.)
Etymology
From Old Thedish hīow "marriage", from Proto-Germanic *hīwą, + alo "ale, beer", from Proto-Germanic *alu. Compare Afrikaans huwelik, Faroese hjúnalag, English bridal.

triwbend /ˈtryːˌbɛnd/ (plural triwbendes /ˈtryːˌbɛnd(ə)s/)
Noun:
1. marriage, the relationship between married people
2. marriage, the state of being married
3. (rare) wedding
4. (figurative) the relationship between commonly associated things or concepts

Alternative forms
triubend, truebend
Etymology
From Old Thedish trīewe "faithful, trustworthy, loyal, true", from Proto-Germanic *triwwiz, + bænd "bond, bind, band", from Proto-Germanic *bandiz. Compare Dutch trouw, German Trauung, Icelandic hjónaband.

Example sentence:
De huyale ef ne cuppel does de beyinning ef her triwbend wy.
/də ˈhœʏ̯ˌaːl ɛf nə ˈkʊpəl duːs də bɛˈjɪnɪŋ ɛf hɛr ˈtryːˌbɛnd ˈwʌɪ̯/
[də ˈhœʏ̯ˌʔaːl‿əv nə ˈkʰʊpəɫ dʊz də bəˈjɪ̃nɨ̃ŋ‿əf həɾ ˈtɾ̥yːˌbɛnd ˈwʌɪ̯]
de huyale ef ne cuppel doe-s de beyinn-ing ef her triwbend wy-Ø
DEF wedding of INDEF couple do.PRES-PRES DEF begin-GER of 3p.GEN marriage celebrate-S.INF 
A couple's wedding celebrates the beginning of their marriage.

Edit: Examples added on December 19th, 2020.

qwed117 wrote: 14 Dec 2020 05:36 First I gotta say, it really cool that you're juggling both Thedish and Gan Vei.
Thank you! I knew I wanted to try to do two entries, one a priori and one a posteriori, every day, since I have plenty of ideas for both kinds. My plan was to switch between different a priori and a posteriori languages throughout the month, but so far it's just been easiest to stick with the two I started with.

And likewise, of course, since you're working with 3 conlangs + Sardinian!
qwed117 wrote: 14 Dec 2020 05:36 Second, I was reading this and realized that I had completely forgotten about classifiers in the Hlai-like A Priori, and the Hlai-lang A Posteriori. It's cool that you're really making this language work together. It feels authentic, and "real".
I was actually debating whether or not to have them in this language at all for a bit, since I don't want it to draw inspiration too heavily or exclusively from East/Southeast Asian natlangs, but I do quite like numeral classifiers, so here we are.

And thank you, that's very nice of you to say! I must admit I'm not quite satisfied with how it's turning out aesthetically, but I'm going to stick with it for a little while longer before making any major adjustments.
Last edited by shimobaatar on 20 Dec 2020 00:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

13 lexembre - Iluhsa

tavani [ˈtavani] n - father (suppletive stem: bab-; < *tabbane, *babə)


14 lexembre

suġnara [ˈsuŋnara] n/adj - (romantic/sexual) love (< *souk "to pursue" + *-ənaza, deverbal)
sóktis [ˈsoktis] v - to pursue, follow (< *souk + *-tis, intensive)
suktisata [sukˈtisata] v - to court (< sóktis + -ata "to do sth for a while")

Compare the following sentences:

Koubžimzarro.
[kou̯bʒimˈzarro]
kòub<šim>za=r=r-o
love<1S.GEN>=COP=2S-DAT

I love you. (to a family member)

Suġnašimzarro.
[suŋnaʃimˈzarro]
Suġna<šim>ra=r=r-o
love<1S.GEN>=COP=2S-DAT

I love you. (to a significant other)


qwed117 wrote: 14 Dec 2020 05:36 I love the word zèite. It reminds me of learning the word 'aceite' in Spanish class when talking about food items. Like 'aceite de oliva', olive oil (which came up surprisingly often).
That similarity is no coincidence [:)] I modeled the protoform on the Aramaic word for "olive", and aceite comes from the Arabic cognate.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Lexember 15th - Yélian

alban [ˈalbɐn] - garlic [Kingdom standard]
áliban [ˈalɨbɐn] - garlic [Provinces standard]
Etymology: new root (derived from my local falafel restaurant)

Vat itrop ocverdet un'alban.
[vɐt ˈitɾɔ̈p ɔ̈kˈveɾdət ʉnˈalbɐn]
DEM sauce exagerrate-3SG DEF.INAN=garlic
This sauce contains too much garlic.

Bonus word :esp:

ajo [axo] - garlic
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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spanick
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by spanick »

Lexember 15

Yemya

vaddatś /ʋɑddɑt͡ɕ/ (v.) ‘to marry, to wed’ from PIE *wedʰdʰ(h₁)eti from *wedʰ- ‘to bind, secure, pledge, guarantee’ and *(e)-dʰ(h₁)eti ‘forms resultative verbs from roots’
vadu /ʋɑdu/ (n.) ‘bride, daughter-in-law’ from PIE *wedʰúHs ‘bride’ (cf. Sankrit वधू)
genś /genɕ/ (n.) ‘woman, wife’ from PIE *gʷénh₂s ‘woman’ (cf. Greek γυνη; English queen; Sanskrit जनि)
jma /ʝmɑ/ (n.) ‘man, husband’ from PIE *ǵʰmṓ ‘earthling; (cf. Latin homo; Old English guma)
naśu /nɑɕu/ (n.) ‘man, hero’ from PIE *n̥ḱús ‘dead, mortal’ (cf. Tocharian A oṅk; Tocharian B eṅkwe; Greek νέκῡς; Old Norse Yngvi)
Last edited by spanick on 15 Dec 2020 18:29, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

15m Decembr

in Borlish and English translation from L'Inclusion Deviante di Conti Polari (The Deviance Incorporation of Folk Tales), 1970 sociological work by Dr Tanasio Capretti, theologian and humanist at the University of Florence, which was published to mark the 120th anniversary of the Laic Declarations of Belgrade.
Just comoscon y dannesc attriboyeu tonneðr ag raug a Thor, cossy meðes poum nos figurar yonoscon venoirn y cont d'un grant centuir ben host cauç de gast, covallant e criant tras y stereom.
Just as the Danes attributed thunder to the wrath of Thor, so too we can imagine whence came the tales of a great army or hunting party of ghosts, riding and shouting across the night sky.

Y vent hurlant, val admettr, appariscn noc tant autr a ci hurl de can cauçour.
The howling winds, after all, sound not so different from the howls of hunting dogs.

Entr hammel istrað a norð de Houmbr e toun covart de ney alpin, paregl son y suajon maternal dað a casc ivan candon oin il y Grant Cauç Ragnt (ben y Herlathing, ben y Wütendes Heer) passant dessur : remanir afont, ogl tornar, attendr outem de creir il no sin la.
From isolated hamlets north of the Humber to snow-blanketed Alpine villages, the motherly advice given to all children when they hear the Great Wild Hunt (or the Herlathing, or the Wütendes Heer) passing overheard is the same: stay inside, look away, do your best to pretend they aren’t there.

Scholar majortaðer reconnoscn oy y cont pouvr d'un cauç gaster divers aun un stemn unic d'antictað, n'Europ toð cas (y racont lanhiaçan comportant son certan desjognt).
Most scholars today accept that the various folk traditions of a ghostly hunt stem from a single ancient source, at least in Europe (the similar Lanhyatian stories are of course unrelated).
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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KaiTheHomoSapien
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien »

Thanks as always for the commentary, Qwed [:)] It motivates me to continue.

I haven't developed any kinship terms for Arculese yet, so here are a couple:

13th

tān - masc. - son

This archaic word is an n-stem masculine noun (underlyingly tan-s). The word appears in Lihmelinyan as well but also in the enlarged form tántris which seems to be tan-s + agentive -tris. (The word is an Easter egg formed from the swapped syllables of the name "Tristan" found in Tristan und Isolde. Used because "Tristan" is the name I plan on giving to my future son. tān is just back-formed from it).

14th

ónerā - fem. - daughter

The /o/ is from an original laryngeal. Cf. Lihmelinayn hnérā.

15th

jégnōr - masc. - husband

pronounced /jɛx.nɔːr/

This word means only "husband". There is a generic word kírkos meaning "spouse", ultimately from a root meaning "to join".
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 15

Gán Vẽi (Entry 15):

ngàt /ŋat˥˧/ (inanimate or animate)
Noun:
1. love, care, affection (for someone)
2. close friend, close relative
3. love, enthusiasm, passion, talent (for something)
4. (informal) hobby, pastime, creativity, art
ngàt /ŋat˥˧/ (comparative ngàt ma /ŋat˥˧ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. loved, beloved, cared for
2. close (of a friend or relative)
3. of or pertaining to love, care, affection, friendship
4. enthusiastic, passionate, talented
5. of or pertaining to enthusiasm, passion, talent
6. (informal) creative, artistic
7. (informal) amateur, done in one's free time
ngàt /ŋat˥˧/ (causative xā ngàt /ɕa˥ ŋat˥˧/)
Verb:
1. to love, to care for, to care about, to show affection for
2. to get along, to be close (of multiple people)
3. to love, to be enthusiastic about, to be passionate about, to have a talent for
4. (informal) to do as a hobby, to do in one's spare time, to create, to make art

Etymology
From Old TBD hngaaʔt "to hold, to carry, to embrace", from Proto-TBD *hɯ "still, ongoing, long-lasting" + *ŋaat "arm" + *dɔk "to support, to balance".
Usage notes
ngàt is used in reference to platonic love, familial love, and creative passion, but is not used to describe romantic love.
In poetry and other forms of literature, the strength of the emotion may be emphasized by treating it as an animate noun.

Example sentence:
Xè nám ngàt hō.
/ɕe˥˧ nam˩˧ ŋat˥˧ ho˥/
[ɕeː˥˧ n̪ɑ̃m˩˧ ŋat̪̚˥˧ ɦoː˥]
xè nám=ngàt=hō
sleep 1s.HAB=love=DIR
I have a passion for sleeping.

Thedish (Entry 15):

laigh /ˈlaɪ̯x/ (long infinitive laighen /ˈlaɪ̯xən/, past participle lain /ˈlaɪ̯n/, present participle laighend /ˈlaɪ̯xənd/, gerund laighing /ˈlaɪ̯xɪŋ/)
Verb:
1. to laugh
2. to chuckle, to giggle; to laugh softly or quietly
3. (rare) to cackle, to guffaw; to laugh loudly or uproariously
4. (archaic) to smile, to show mirth

Alternative forms
laighel, yelain (pst. ptcp.), yelaighen (pst. ptcp.), laighed (pst. ptcp.), laight (pst. ptcp.)
Etymology
From Old Thedish hlæhhian, from Proto-Germanic *hlahjaną. Compare English laugh, Low German lachen, Afrikaans lag, Yiddish לאַכן (lakhn), Icelandic hlæja.
The alternative form laighel /ˈlaɪ̯xəl/ came about via analogy with words like staighel /ˈstaɪ̯xəl/ "to temper, to steel" and taugher /ˈtaʊ̯xər/ "tear (in the eye)". /x/ is the least common consonant phoneme in Thedish; in native vocabulary, it appears almost exclusively word-finally after a liquid, as in margh /ˈmarx/ "marrow", or word-medially between a diphthong and schwa followed by a liquid, as in fyghel /ˈfʌɪ̯xəl/ "rasp, file (tool)". laigh /ˈlaɪ̯x/ is one of the few words, and certainly the most common word, for which this does not hold, and so it is semi-frequently remodeled as laighel to better fit this pattern.

dwaughel /ˈdwaʊ̯xəl/ (plural dwaughels /ˈdwaʊ̯xəls/)
Noun:
1. washbasin, handbasin, washbowl
2. sink
3. tub, bathtub
4. (Christianity, rare) lavatory, lavabo, laver, piscina

Etymology
From Old Thedish þwahhel, from Proto-Germanic *þwahlą. Compare Swedish tvål.

Example sentence:
Why is duy laighend? It is bloot ne wenly dwaughel.
/hwʌɪ̯ ɪs dœʏ̯ ˈlaɪ̯xənd || ɪt ɪs ˈbloːt nə ˈwɛnlʌɪ̯ ˈdwaʊ̯xəl/
[ʍe‿z dø ˈlaɪ̯χə̃nd || ɪt̚‿s ˈbloːt̚ nə ˈwɛ̃nle ˈdwaʊ̯χəɫ]
why is-Ø duy laigh-end? it is-Ø bloot ne wenly dwaughel
why be.PRES-PRES 2s.NOM laugh-PRES.PTCP? 3s.N.NOM be.PRES-PRES simple INDEF normal washbasin 
Why are you laughing? It's just a regular sink.

Edit: Examples added on December 19th, 2020.
Last edited by shimobaatar on 20 Dec 2020 00:19, edited 1 time in total.
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Davush
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Davush »

15

wamo 'river' (OBL: wamawe, -o stem with -awe OBL. Probably from earlier *wamaw)

kiso 'people' (OBL: ksame, -o stem with -ame OBL. Probably from earlier *kisam). May take singular or plural agreement on the verb.

Sapsinea kiso samatu harae sapsoan kiso wamawe
see-PST-1sg-3sg people mountain that.pl-OBL see-PST-3sg-1sg people river-OBL
'I saw people in those mountains (yonder) (and) people saw me at the river'

Note: Hakuan often simply links clauses without any conjunctions such as 'and' or 'but'.
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qwed117
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 15th
ğèm1 /ɰɛm˧/ n. wife
jí3 /ɕiː˧˩˥/ n. brother
guang2 /gʷaŋ˥/ v. to love amorously

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
bˀat- v 'to be kin with, to call family'

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
ɓayʔ˩˨ n 'wife' from Proto- Hlai *hmiːʔ, cf. Nadouhua pay3, Moyfaw pɯ3

Sardinian
demprire v 'to ripen' from Vulgar Latin *ADIMPLIO 'to fill up, to perform, to fulfil', from Vulgar Latin *AD + IMPLIO from Classical Latin IMPLEO cf. Portuguese encher, 'to inflate', French remplir 'to fill'

Candho drimpit, sa frútura est durche.
When it ripens, the fruit is sweet.

Deus aiat dempritu su disitzu meu
God has matured* my desire

*I supposed 'fulfilled' might be a better word here. 'to ripen' is the primary definition I was shown.

Dormouse559 wrote: 15 Dec 2020 07:25
qwed117 wrote: 14 Dec 2020 05:36 I love the word zèite. It reminds me of learning the word 'aceite' in Spanish class when talking about food items. Like 'aceite de oliva', olive oil (which came up surprisingly often).
That similarity is no coincidence [:)] I modeled the protoform on the Aramaic word for "olive", and aceite comes from the Arabic cognate.
Well, TIL! [:D]
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

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Dormouse559
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

15 lexembre - Iluhsa

méa [ˈmea] v - to please (< *meifa)
miaxazza [mi̯aˈxazza] n/adj - happiness, pleasure; happy (miaxan-; < méaxa "be pleased" + -azza, stative deverbal)

kað [ˈkað] n - water (< *kʷad + *-əd, no-longer-productive nominalizer)

Órži miaxana muðai libetkumòbeni kað.
[ˈorʒi ˈmi̯axana ˈmuðai̯ libetkuˈmɔbeni ˈkað]
órži miaxan-a-∅ muð<a>i liba-it-k=m-o=beni kað
drink.PFT.3S happy-ERG-ATTR dog<ERG> give-PLU-1S.NOM=3S-DAT=REL.ABS water.ABS

The happy dog drank the water I had given it.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Lexember 16th - Yélian

ivæscon [ɨˈʋœskɔ̈n] - chimney (chiefly the tube-like part on top of the roof that directs the smoke out of the building)
Etymology: From ivór "chimney" + escon "stone"

Additional words/structures for the example sentence:
Spoiler:
bicats [ˈbikɐt͡s] - evidential prefix used for actions that are evidenced from oral history; in the example sentence it means "according to a folk tale, ..."
Etymology: from bica "to say"

Sar Clás [sad̟ klas] - Santa Claus
Etymology: loan translation from English Santa Clause. Christmas is not celebrated in Yélian culture.
Sar Clás bicatsmazet u'dolan pès îyin iu ivæsconan.
[sad̟ klas ˌbikɐt͡sˈmaɟət ʉˈdoːlɐn pɛs ˈiːɕɨn ɪ̯uː ɨˈʋœskɔ̈nɐn]
PROP EVID-deliver-3SG DEF.INAN=present-PL to child-PL through chimney-PL
According to a folk tale, Santa Clause delivers the presents to children through the chimneys.

Bonus word :esp:

enviar [enˈbjar] - to deliver
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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