Lexember 2020

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Dormouse559
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

31 lexembre - Iluhsa
A few minutes late, here are some words on ending and beginning:

bénita [ˈbenita] v - begin (sth); open (sth) (< béniti "opening" + -a, verbalizer)
hòum [ˈhɔu̯m] v - begin (middle voice) (< *paum)
surti [ˈsurti] v - end, finish, come to an end (< surza + -ti, inchoative)
surtio [ˈsurti̯o] v - end, finish, bring to an end (< surza + -tio, causative)

hòumnara [ˈhɔu̯mnara] n/adj - beginning; starting (< hòum + -(V)nara, deverbal)
surza [ˈsurza] n/adj - end; ending, finished (< *surza)


Óržina binétak kað.
[ˈorʒina biˈnetak ˈkað]
órži-(V)na bénita-k kað
drink-INF begin.PST-1S.NOM water.ABS

I began to drink the water.

Surtiavit ginda uržidammim.
[surˈti̯avit ˈginda urʒiˈdammim]
surtio-it ginid-a uržidam-m-im
finish-PLU woman-ERG drink-3S-GEN

The woman had finished her drink.

— Houmnaksar vèiti. — Houmnarar vèiti.
[hou̯mˈnaksar ˈvɛi̯ti | hou̯mˈnarar ˈvɛi̯ti]
hòumna-ak-za=r vèiti | hòumna-za=r vèiti
beginning-LOC-PRED=COP night.ABS | beginning.ABS-PRED=COP night.ABS

— The night is beginning. — The night has begun./It is nighttime.

— Suraksar vèiti. — Surzar vèiti.
[suˈraksar ˈvɛi̯ti | ˈsurzar ˈvɛi̯ti]
sur-ak-za=r vèiti | sur-za=r vèiti
end-LOC-PRED=COP night.ABS | end.ABS-PRED=COP night.ABS

— The night is ending. — The night is over.

In the last two pairs of sentences, note how an abstract noun (like hòumnara and surza) in the locative case communicates a fleeting or changing state, while the same noun in the absolutive implies a lasting or unchanging state.


shimobaatar wrote: 31 Dec 2020 06:02 I realized recently that I'd gone almost the entire month without creating any words for Gán Vẽi beginning with /t/, either for main Lexember entries or for example sentences. All other initial consonant phonemes were represented, both in main entries and in the examples, and there were words with coda /t/, but somehow there weren't any with /t/ in the onset of the syllable. I also realized that none of the words I'd used for main entries had the rimes /Vc u e o iw uj/ or the high-level tone. I decided to rectify all of these gross injustices today with two three-word items.
It's funny how these subconscious preferences reveal themselves. I realized that Iluhsa had only one word beginning with /n/. That was why I made my words for "lamp" and "star" néli and niliksi.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Thank you for everyone who participated in the Lexember this year!

In total (with additional words), I created 101 new words in Yélian this Lexember.

If you have a semi-developed conlang like I do (by "semi-developed" I mean that it's not in the incubator anymore, but it's not exactly Kankonian either) Lexember is always really funny, especially with the topic constraints we have had last year and this year again. You end up creating high-end vocabulary like "libertarianism", "snowball system" or "tax law", but in the same instant you realize how many basic words you're still missing, like "paprika", "candy" or "Jeans"! I guess the path to conlanging never goes to an end.

Also, if I can suggest an idea for improvement, I wouldn't mind if the category "belief and folklore" was regrouped with other words, or at least reserved for the last week. I can only speak for myself, but in this category I either end up creating made-up words for my conhistory, or real-life words where I need to be super careful with the example sentences, due to the sensitivity of the topic. So, I wouldn't mind if there was a category "culture and religion" grouped together, and maybe "food and household items" split from "family, relationships and friendship".

I put the entire list of my newly coined words behind the following spoiler tags, where the words are marked that were featured in the Lexember.
Spoiler:
acadsóline - civil war (Dec 27)
ainrandas - libertarian
ainrandasé - libertarianism
alban - garlic (Dec 15)
áliban - garlic (Dec 15)
ánpibades - rotten meat
apua - to work focused on something
asoldap - cotton candy (Dec 28)
beitneset - synagogue (Dec 20)
bicats - prefix for evidential III ("It is told that...")
bigadonor - grasshopper, locust (Dec 10)
brádasi - believing, religious
brigita - to come out (as gay, bisexual etc.) (Dec 19)
brigital - coming-out
can oyaukó - of course, obviously, self-evidently
cascar o'bela - snowball system
ceilvat - time between the years, "no-days"
cena - to praise, commend (Dec 26)
cepèno - step father (Dec 14)
quepèno - step father (Dec 14)
ceren - step
cerenpèsceren - step by step, bit by bit, gradually
cocktail - cocktail
condanaityel - pantyhose (Dec 01)
còtail - cocktail
cristabár - christmas tree
cristlovenúm - christmas market
crístolar - christmas gift
cútan - hundreds (of sth.)
drant - coast, coastline (Dec 11)
dresdenól - stollen (Dec 28)
ègerbica - to stand up for so. (Dec 17)
esmufi - smoothie
espèra - to spend (money)
espèral - expense (money)
espèral o'pídedal - travel expenses
faʻat - well
fabical - tale, fairytale
fadværa - to cast out, throw out, make redundant
falafel - fallafel
galcer - skull (Dec 03)
glútanor - barkeeper
iftoca - to make sick, nauseatic (Dec 04)
ivæscon - chimney (chiefly the tube-like part on top) (Dec 16)
iʻéni - red paprika
iʻénsokól - pepper nut
langoy - lángos (Dec 28)
lècanvendats - bratwurst (Dec 28)
leʻiparge - uniform (Dec 05)
leʻitòivan - freedom and equality
leʻitòivanas - liberal
leʻitòivanasé - liberalism (Dec 22)
medvedsól - burnt almonds (Dec 28)
meyeia - to fast (abstain from food) - (Dec 30)
muyasina - fasting period (Dec 30)
muyasól - sweet, candy
nurnbergól - gingerbread, lebkuchen (Dec 28)
ocverda - to have too much (of sth.)
olceblidal - weather forecast (Dec 09)
pèméva - step mother
pènamo - step brother (Dec 13)
pènapor - step son
pènemia - step sister
pènepia - step daughter
pereyiano - "fall-asleep thoughts" (Dec 24)
períneva - to go to sleep
pèsa - to direct to someone, cast upon someone
plærmude - salt lake (Dec 07)
putboca - to become sick, nauseatic (Dec 04)
rîyats - indirect evidential ("I heard that..."
Sar Clás - Santa Clause
selia - to get; to get a loan
sèrtersól - crêpe (Dec 28)
siabical - toast (speech before drinking)
siyva - sink (Dec 18)
siývaras - faucet
tanisé o'mascarad - tax law
tápuʻat - custom, rite, convention, folkway (Dec 25)
teced - curve (Dec 02)
tetmuyats - gullible, credulous (Dec 19)
tetmuyatsa - be gullible, credulous
tyins - Jeans
ulapèsa - to curse (Dec 23)
upaleva - to play wrong notes (with an instrument)
væra - to host
valats - direct evidential ("I saw that")
vástia - wilderness (Dec 12)
vendecam - toast, toasted bread (Dec 31)
vincárasa - nutrient
vinquárasa - nutrient
vinpulvon - mulled wine (Dec 28)
yacana - more than
yampani - sparkling wine, champagne
yampiýn - sparkling wine, champagne
yitármiku - celery, fennel
yitármikuzali - fennel (particularly)
ytépæral - orthopteron, grasshopper, cikada, locust (Dec 10)
ʻamièda - to blend, mix (Dec 8)
ʻéniela - paprika (yellow or green), paprika powder
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

Although I didn't actually participate in Lexember, I did aff over 200 new words to Kankonian over the last week of 2020. A sampling (87 words plus one idiom) is here.

Totally love that list, Iyionaku! [<3]
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 67,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Dormouse559 wrote: 01 Jan 2021 09:11
shimobaatar wrote: 31 Dec 2020 06:02 I realized recently that I'd gone almost the entire month without creating any words for Gán Vẽi beginning with /t/, either for main Lexember entries or for example sentences. All other initial consonant phonemes were represented, both in main entries and in the examples, and there were words with coda /t/, but somehow there weren't any with /t/ in the onset of the syllable. I also realized that none of the words I'd used for main entries had the rimes /Vc u e o iw uj/ or the high-level tone. I decided to rectify all of these gross injustices today with two three-word items.
It's funny how these subconscious preferences reveal themselves. I realized that Iluhsa had only one word beginning with /n/. That was why I made my words for "lamp" and "star" néli and niliksi.
Out of the 114 words I coined for the A Priori Hlai-like Language, none begin with <n>. Lovely. I kept checking if some of the weirder phonemes (khw, zh, z, c, ch) would be represented, but never thought I miss one of the common phonemes.

I should have completed 31 words for S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o, but for some reason my dictionary doesn't reflect that much. I'll have to figure that one out later
Edit: Forgot to add the word s₃ajm̥-i n 'fruit', from Lexember 19th and account for the two affixes that were added
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

The SqwedgePad
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

Just on a lark, I alphabetized all the 200+ Kankonian words I added in the last week, and discovered that I hadn't created any Y-words, nor words beginning with the lagma (the sound I transcribe as an asterisk on this forum, the velar lateral)! (No NG, OER, nor OU words either, but those Kankonian letters don't begin too many words.)

EDIT: I alphabetized those entries by English gloss, and found out that all 26 English initial letters were represented, including X (with words for xenophilia and xenoglossophobia).
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 67,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Happy New Year, everyone!

Many, many thanks to all of you who participated - even for just one day - in Lexember 2020! Lexember is never an easy commitment, I feel, but this past year was weird and challenging in so many new ways for all of us. As usual, I'm relieved the month is over, but I'm reasonably happy with what I was able to accomplish throughout it, and I had a lot of fun putting posts together and getting to see what others were working on! I hope this was a positive experience for the rest of you, as well. [:D]

I wish all of you a safe, happy, and healthy 2021, and hopefully I'll see at least some of you back at the end of the year for another Lexember!

As promised, over the last two days, I went back through the thread and took the time to properly read over everyone's posts. I've prepared at least some kind of response for everyone who participated, but all together my comments are rather long, so I'll be including them in their own post shortly after this one. Please let me know if there's anyone I've somehow overlooked!

Dormouse559 wrote: 01 Jan 2021 09:11
shimobaatar wrote: 31 Dec 2020 06:02 I realized recently that I'd gone almost the entire month without creating any words for Gán Vẽi beginning with /t/, either for main Lexember entries or for example sentences. All other initial consonant phonemes were represented, both in main entries and in the examples, and there were words with coda /t/, but somehow there weren't any with /t/ in the onset of the syllable. I also realized that none of the words I'd used for main entries had the rimes /Vc u e o iw uj/ or the high-level tone. I decided to rectify all of these gross injustices today with two three-word items.
It's funny how these subconscious preferences reveal themselves. I realized that Iluhsa had only one word beginning with /n/. That was why I made my words for "lamp" and "star" néli and niliksi.
Oh, that's an interesting point! I hadn't considered that it might reflect some sort of subconscious bias against /t/ on my part, rather than just a weird "accident", but now that I think about it, I believe I'd also noticed a deficiency of /t/-initial words in Y²KS in 2018 and 2019. Strange!
shimobaatar wrote: 14 Dec 2020 04:49
Dormouse559 wrote: 13 Dec 2020 07:59
shimobaatar wrote: 13 Dec 2020 04:50Once I have some more time on my hands, I'd like to try to look further into the etymology of wecle, since Wiktionary doesn't indicate where Old French got it from. The initial w- suggests it may have been borrowed from a Germanic language, perhaps.
Let me know if you find anything. Certainly, most Old French forms with initial <w> come from Germanic.
Will do! [tick]
Sadly, nothing promising has turned up so far, but I'm not giving up yet!


Iyionaku wrote: 01 Jan 2021 13:31 Also, if I can suggest an idea for improvement, I wouldn't mind if the category "belief and folklore" was regrouped with other words, or at least reserved for the last week. I can only speak for myself, but in this category I either end up creating made-up words for my conhistory, or real-life words where I need to be super careful with the example sentences, due to the sensitivity of the topic. So, I wouldn't mind if there was a category "culture and religion" grouped together, and maybe "food and household items" split from "family, relationships and friendship".
Actually, I'd been thinking the same thing! Unfortunately, by the time it occurred to me that combining or reorganizing some of those categories would make more sense, the month had already started and I didn't want to completely change up the themes in case anyone had already been planning ahead based on the ones I'd originally listed out in the first post of this thread.

"Creating made-up words for" concultures/conhistories/conworlds was essentially what I intended the "goal" of that theme to be, although that's a good point about wanting to tread lightly around certain real-life topics. The folklore theme seemed pretty well-received last year, so that's why I brought it back for 2020.

If I get to make the thread for Lexember again at the end of this year, I don't know what the suggested themes will end up being, but I'll definitely take what you've said here into account. [tick]
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Iyionaku:
Spoiler:
First, well done keeping up with the Spanish words throughout the month! I hope to be able to make that kind of commitment myself, on top of daily conlang vocabulary creation, eventually!

Second, it's always lovely to see more of Yélian. I find many of your words' etymologies and many of the usage notes you included very interesting! I'm definitely a fan of how Yélian has words borrowed from natlangs like English or Hebrew and words inspired by the names of local restaurants (as well as words like ainrandasé for "libertarianism", for instance), but also words derived from other conlangs like Caelian - I'll have to do a search of the board to refresh my memory on this one - or even "from an unknown substrate language".

Although I find many Yélian words aesthetically pleasing, two of my favorites from this Lexember are ytépæral [ˈʃteːpəɾɐl] "orthopteran, grasshopper, cicada, locust" and cerenpèsceren [kəɾənˈpɛskəɾən] "gradually, step by step, bit by bit, one at a time, by degrees". For me, the forms and meanings of these words really feel like they fit together well, for whatever reason.
Iyionaku wrote: 05 Dec 2020 18:22 Cinarzabai an'acarèd o'Braveyélian, cut ianaîyas pi cenim leʻibargen yayinasbul.
[kɨnɐɾˈɟaːbaɪ̯ ɐnɐkɐˈɾɛd ɔ̈ˈbɾaːʋəˌʃeːlɪ̯ɐn, kʉt ɪ̯ɐˈnaɪ̯ʃɐs pɨ ˈkeːnɨm ˌleːʔɨˈbaɾgən ʃɐˈɕiːnɐsbʉl]
NEG-really-like-1SG DEF.ANIM=military DEF.GEN=kingdom_shellian, but NEC-admit-JUS.1SG that 3PL.POSS uniform-PL very-chic-COP.3PL
I really don't like the military of the Kingdom of Shelliania, but I have to admit that their uniforms are very stylish.
I know how "Yélian" is pronounced, but I'm so used to seeing it spelled with a <y> that I didn't immediately realize the connection to "Shelliania".

Some additional bits of cultural/historical insight that I enjoyed:
Iyionaku wrote: 03 Dec 2020 09:21 Etymology: shortening of gacúleger, literally "eye-protector", via gacler (metathesis of c and l). The word used to exlusively describe the perpendicular plate and the nasal bone, but was later extended to denote the entire skull after the old word paradaû was taboo'd for religious reasons.
Iyionaku wrote: 10 Dec 2020 10:21 USAGE NOTES: Both words denote the same species, but the difference is clear: The first word is neutral to positive, the word you'd tell your kids when they see them in the fields, whereas the latter is pejorative and a word you'd hear in the news when there is a plague.
Iyionaku wrote: 14 Dec 2020 06:59 USAGE NOTES: The word used to be very derogatory, similar to "bastard" in English (but the other way round), but with the liberalisation of the Yélian society it became a quite neutral word.
Iyionaku wrote: 18 Dec 2020 16:27 Etymology: siyva "camel"; The first primitive sinks in Shelliania used a technology similar to how camels store their water, and only could store a finite amount.
Jackk:
Spoiler:
What can I say here in praise of Boral that I haven't already said, probably several times, over the years? It's undoubtably one of my favorite a posteriori conlangs, and I was glad to have gotten the chance to work with it as part of the most recent relay. Written Boral has a charming and unique aesthetic that, in my opinion, so perfectly encapsulates the core concept for the language. Certain words especially help to "communicate" that this is a Romance language native to a particular corner of Europe. Based on your transcriptions, I quite like the sound of it as well! A few of my favorite Boral entries from this Lexember include naðeu, scavour, amigtað colleger, and scaumel.

I admire your presentation as well! Your etymologies are superb. I'm particularly fond of the semantic shifts you've described, as I personally find that sort of thing to be one of the more difficult aspects of conlanging, as well as the details you've included about the earliest attestations of certain words or senses of words.

I must admit I was surprised, although certainly not "disappointed", to see that some of your entries this year were focused on worldbuilding rather than coining a particular new word or phrase. I wouldn't have thought of that myself, and it's great to see participants taking advantage of Lexember in their own creative ways. You're a skilled writer and dedicated worldbuilder, and I've thoroughly enjoyed taking the time to go back and properly read through everything you shared here in the thread. Although each excerpt left me wanting to know more - wanting to read novels and academic papers that I know don't exist, the details and references contained within were more than enough to help the world in which Boral is spoken feel real and alive, so to speak. I get the same feeling from the language itself. Actually, this has reminded me that I still need to make time to read through the alternate history thread you started last year!
Jackk wrote: 06 Dec 2020 19:24 …and while the status quo of Imperial hegemony was already falling apart (with the dissolution of the First Drengotian Empire to the west, the Genovese invasion of the Tyrrhenian Isles in 1207 and the declaration of independent Maghrebi and Libyan emirates in 1237/هـ634)
I like the use of hāʾ for AH in a text otherwise written in the Latin alphabet. If this is ever done in our world, I haven't seen it before, at least.
Jackk wrote: 10 Dec 2020 12:41 < from Middle Boral busr /ˈby.zr̩/, from Old Boral bus(e)n /byz(ə)n/ “example, edict, command”. This comes from Old English bȳsen “example, parable, precept”, from Classical German būsnis with the same senses. It displaced native Old Boral exemple, a semi-learned from Latin exemplum “sample, example”, whence also issambr “slaughter, massacre, ruin” (by way of “warning, threat”).
Whoa, is "Classical German" roughly equivalent to our Proto-Germanic? Is it attested?
Jackk wrote: 13 Dec 2020 00:44 short excerpt from Milda ver Ragner’s 1954 popular history Grex Byd: Kyvarvod y Vaωr Morωn (A Girdled World: The Great Borunesk Meeting), a popular account of the 1517 coming together of people from around the world on the island of Borune [Borneo], and the sequence of events that led up to it.
That's a fun moment to imagine!

Also, I like the use of omega here! It caught my eye briefly last month, and I initially thought of Gian Giorgio Trissino's proposal involving the use of <ɛ ω> for /ɛ ɔ/ in Italian. Now that I've had time to properly read through everything you posted, however, it seems like "Boralverse" Welsh uses <ω> rather than <w>. This shows up again later in Y Ðreic o Redrωth.
Jackk wrote: 20 Dec 2020 16:38 gyr cottidian /ˈʒɪr ˌko.tiˈdjan/ body clock, circadian rhythm
< from the mid-nineteenth century in reference to the systems in the biology of an organism which are periodic with a period of roughly one day. It is a specialisation from the generic term gyr veunt “living cycles”, itself a calque from Scholastic Latin gȳrī vīventēs, both of which are attested from a few decades earlier. The noun gyr “orbit, cycle” is borrowed from Latin gȳrus “circle, cycle, orbit, ring”, from Greek γῦρος (gûros) “ring”. The adjective cottidian “daily” is a Middle Boral borrowing of Latin cotīdiānus “everyday, quotidian, ordinary"—see the inherited word cojan "ordinary, boring, unsurprising”.
Aside from the textual excerpts, of course, I find that words and phrases like this one really help to "sell" Boral, so to speak, as a language spoken in a version of our world with its own unique, not-quite-familiar history. There are certain terms, like "circadian rhythm", which tend to be roughly the same across the Romance languages, and often more generally across European languages, in our world, so seeing Boral use something reasonable yet unexpected like gyr cottidian definitely has an impact on me.

Also, I had a fun moment of sudden realization connecting cottidian to "quotidian" while reading this post!
Jackk wrote: 22 Dec 2020 15:59 < borrowed into Old Boral as ispornar “to reject, spurn” from Old English spornan “to kick; to reject”. For comparison, see modern Wessern spurren “to misstep, trip, make a mistake” and Kentish sporn “to trample, force to the ground, crush, decisively beat”
Oh, are (descendants of) West Saxon(?) and Kentish Old English considered separate languages in this universe?
Jackk wrote: 25 Dec 2020 00:30 excerpted from Folk Cusdoms and Holidays oth North: a Compendium, published 1876 in Markland by the Safford University Primers as part of a project spearheaded by the Rexam Indreck (Ymdreh Car Vantel) for outland sharing.
Very interesting! Also, is "oth North" equivalent to "of the North"?
Jackk wrote: 30 Dec 2020 20:53 Novamund

[…]

Vetomundine
These are fun!
Jackk wrote: 19 Dec 2020 01:13 in translation from the 1981 scitation paper for the Dijon New School’s Domain History [1] course L'Art Militaire ès Guerres Romantiques (Strategy in the Romantic Wars). The course covers the 1640s to ‘60s, the most active portion of the various conflicts all grouped together under the label “Romantic Wars”.
I very much appreciated the footnotes here!
Jackk wrote: 01 Jan 2021 00:13 < borrowed 19C during the Good Game period from Venise Italian rasgatto “resolution, unravelling of a mystery or story”, used at first in the literary circles of the region. This comes from Zahid Russian разгадто “unknotting, solving”, and specifically from Boxa author Olexi Harchenko’s mystery romance of the same name. The word had spread to different spheres by the 1910s, and to the “end of an event” by 1941—specifically referring to the pitch crowds that formed after professional lineball matches.
Zahid Russian?
Jackk wrote: 15 Dec 2020 16:33 in Borlish and English translation from L'Inclusion Deviante di Conti Polari (The Deviance Incorporation of Folk Tales), 1970 sociological work by Dr Tanasio Capretti, theologian and humanist at the University of Florence, which was published to mark the 120th anniversary of the Laic Declarations of Belgrade.
Oh, wonderful! Coincidentally, I ended up using the Wild Hunt for one of my entries later on in the month. I wasn't consciously aware of this post until now, but perhaps I was subconsciously influenced!
Davush:
Spoiler:
Hakuan has a very nice aesthetic that I can't exactly say reminds me of any one specific natlang or group of natlangs. I'm going to have to try to remember to check out the thread I believe you've made about it.

A few words from throughout the month that I particularly liked:
Davush wrote: 02 Dec 2020 21:15 kanbu /ˈkambu/ 'door'
[…]
iwahpa /iˈwahpa/ 'cave'
Davush wrote: 04 Dec 2020 00:35 yanba 'water, ocean' (mostly in the sense of 'body of water' rather than 'drink of water')
yahanbe 'in the water'
Davush wrote: 11 Dec 2020 15:22 samatu /sa'matu/ mountain (ADV: samoote)
Davush wrote: 12 Dec 2020 14:03 psoa /'psoa/ 'air, atmosphere' (OBL: psawe)
Davush wrote: 14 Dec 2020 12:05 tanosa flower (OBL: tanoase)

saka(s) field (some nouns have a fleeting /s/ which only reappears in the oblique. Saka : Sakase).
Davush wrote: 15 Dec 2020 23:07 wamo 'river' (OBL: wamawe, -o stem with -awe OBL. Probably from earlier *wamaw)

kiso 'people' (OBL: ksame, -o stem with -ame OBL. Probably from earlier *kisam). May take singular or plural agreement on the verb.
Davush wrote: 19 Dec 2020 12:30 teni hand
Davush wrote: 16 Dec 2020 13:29 sunha 'dog' (OBL: suanhe)
The <nh> in sunha makes me think of Portuguese, although I'm not sure if it represents /ɲ/ in Hakuan.
Davush wrote: 14 Dec 2020 12:05 Note: it is common for plural nouns to show singular agreement when they aren't specific. Plural marking is more common, or required, when the plural-referent is more definite.
Davush wrote: 21 Dec 2020 01:06 sasap 'a type of grain' (likely a loan: a number of nouns of the form CVCV-C with an initial reduplicated syllable and final stop appear, but nowhere else in the language)
Very interesting notes!
Davush wrote: 10 Dec 2020 14:44 trap- 'to play music'
I believe there's a genre of music called "trap" in English. Was this an intentional reference, or just a coincidence?
DesEsseintes:
Spoiler:
DesEsseintes wrote: 01 Dec 2020 15:51 Hɨɨ - Lex 1st

vɨɨtɨn n. - cloth
iivɨtɨn - my cloth
Oh, very nice! I feel like it's been a little while since I, personally at least, have encountered a member of this family here on the board. Always a pleasure, I can assure you! I find both of the forms given here aesthetically pleasing, and I'm particularly fond of the alternation in vowel length between vɨɨtɨn and iivɨtɨn.
spanick:
Spoiler:
spanick wrote: 01 Dec 2020 17:57 caa /t͡ʃaː/ ‘be white, bright’
ciire /t͡ʃiːre/ ‘be yellow, brown’
šaap /ʃaːp/ ‘be black, dark’
šee /ʃeː/ ‘be red, orange’
t’oo /t’oː/ ‘be green, blue’

cirre is best described as a sort of golden yellow of dried grass. As such, it also is used to describe light browns. The wood and bark of many trees would be described as ciire. However, the reddish-brown of most clays and mud is described using šee. The sun would not be described as ciire but as caa, except late in the day around sunset, when it is usually described as šee.

Similarly, deep water such as that of a large lake (the Yinše don't live near a sea or ocean) is often described as šaap rather than t'oo.
spanick wrote: 03 Dec 2020 06:00 hi’iš /hiʔiʃ/ (n) square, (s.v.) be square; from hi’i ‘four’ plus the relativizer .
Glad to see more of Yinše! I like how all of these words look and sound, and I appreciate the notes on how the color terms are used!

Additionally, I enjoyed being able to compare words in Yemya with their PIE ancestors and some of their cognates in other IE languages. I like how this language generally looks and sounds as well. Yemya definitely feels like it fits within the family, but it also seems to have some unique features that help it stand out - two important qualities for an a posteriori language, I feel. The apparent laryngeal reflexes in, for instance, śokh /ɕokʰ/ and śaus /ɕaus/ come to mind immediately. Speaking of those two words, I'm also always a fan of fossilized dual forms and things like that.
spanick wrote: 16 Dec 2020 17:54 I decided to do kinship terms today and I kinda went all out. I've opted not to include etymologies right now, though I may add them in later in a spoiler. Yemya has lost a lot of IE features like declension and conjugation. But I decided that kinship terms is one of the ways it's most conservative, becasue kinship and extended family is a particularly important feature of Yemya culture. This should reflect a sort of modified (I think) Omaha kinship system. I also still need to include words cross cousin more terms for in-laws.

dukathar /dukɑtʰɑr/ (n.) ‘daughter, niece (same sex sibling's daughter)’
brathar /bɾɑtʰɑr/ (n.) ‘brother, parallel male-cousin’
suyu /suju/ (n.) ‘son, nephew (same sex sibling's son)’
svasar /sʋɑsɑr/ ‘sister, parallel female-cousin’
matar /mɑtɑr/ (n.) ‘mother’
phatar /pʰɑtɑr/ (n.) ‘father’
jenathor /ʝenɑtʰor/ (n.) parent
jalau /ʝɑlau/ (n.) ‘brother’s wife, sister in law’
janathar /ʝɑnɑtʰɑr/ (n.) ‘co-sister-in-law, brother-in-law’s wife’
nephat /nepʰɑt/ (n.) ‘nephew (opposite sex sibling's son), grandson’
nettśa /net͡ɕt͡ɕɑ/ (n.) ‘niece (opposite sex sibling's daughter), granddaughter’
śauśa /ɕauɕɑ/ (n.) ‘grandfather’
śauśya /ɕauɕjɑ/ (n.) ‘grandmother’
phatrauya /pʰɑtɾaujɑ/ (n.) ‘paternal uncle’
matra /mɑtɾɑ/ (n.) ‘maternal aunt’
jmathar /ʝmɑtʰɑr/ ‘brother-in-law’
vadu /ʋɑdu/ (n.) ‘bride, daughter-in-law’
spanick wrote: 17 Dec 2020 16:30 So, as I developed this more, I realized that I actually had an Iroquois kinship system I had in mind. As a reminder: a parallel cousin is the child of your parents' same sex sibling (paternal uncle/maternal aunt) while a cross cousin is every other kind of cousin, this includes first cousins if they're the children of your parents' opposite sex sibling. I've repeated some terms from before both to give them more refined meanings and also to show the whole system a little better.

Extended Family
phatrauya/pʰɑtɾaujɑ/ (n.) ‘paternal uncle’
phatraya/pʰɑtɾɑjɑ/ (n.) ‘paternal aunt’
matra /mɑtɾɑ/ (n.) ‘maternal aunt’
matratha/mɑtɾɑtʰɑ/ (n.) ‘maternal uncle’
brathar /bɾɑtʰɑr/ (n.) ‘brother, male parallel cousin’
svasar /sʋɑsɑr/ ‘sister, female parallel cousin’
jnayana /ʝnɑjɑnɑ/ (n.) ‘male cross cousin’
jnayanya /ʝnɑjɑnɑ/ (n.) ‘female cross cousin’

In-Laws
sveśura /sʋeɕurɑ/ (n.) ‘father-in-law’
svaśrau /sʋɑɕɾau/ (n.) ‘mother-in-law’
svaśura /sʋɑɕurɑ/ (n.) ‘brother-in-law (wife’s brother)’
svaśya /sʋɑɕjɑ/ (n.) ‘sister-in-law (wife’s sister)’
taivar /taiʋɑr/ (n.) ‘brother-in-law (husband’s brother)’
juśwa /ʝuɕʋɑ/ (n.) ‘sister-in-law (husband’s sister)’
Very impressive!
brblues:
Spoiler:
I think it was actually Proto-Bokisig that you used for one of the relatively recent relays, but in any case, I remember having the pleasure of getting to work with some form of Bokisig in the past, and it's nice to see more of the language/these languages here. I especially appreciate all of your etymological notes, the declension table on Day 11, and the proverb on Day 6!

Out of all the Classical Bokisig words presented in this thread last month, I particularly like those derived in various ways from Early Bokisig /ɣez/. <jeskom> and <jestom> in particular make me think of Arabic يسكن (yaskun(u)) and Polish jestem, respectively.
qwed117:
Spoiler:
First, I was once again very impressed with your dedication to keeping up with Sardinian throughout the month while simultaneously coining words for three conlangs every day. Honestly, the fact that you're studying Sardinian itself is impressive; there can't be too many resources out there, I'd imagine. I didn't end up having the time or energy for anything like that myself this time around, but I suppose we'll see how things go for Lexember 2021. Some of my favorite Sardinian words that you shared with us last month include perca~pelcia~pescia~preca~percia, paristória, giana, duene, and ocannu.

Second, as I believe I've said, I like the generally look and feel of your a priori Hlai-inspired language. Certain orthographic choices, such as <j> for /ɕ/, are particularly appealing to me. I'll have to try to remember to check out the post you've made on it over in your scratchpad thread soon. Some of my favorite words from this language include hëi3 yo1, mő2, höl1, may4, jó2, bòy2~-bòy, myang2, sèi2, hwòy2, am2-am2, wai3-yang2, guay3, jong3, kòi1, bay3-yang2, mi2-ya3, hő4, müy4, jé3-yo1, möy1-hé2, hë3, haw2-yë4, yòu2, ja1, mű2, söw1-hyá4, khǒ1, and òi2.

Third, it was nice to see more of *S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u. I think I still have to get "caught up" with some of the more recent posts in the thread for it, actually. Some of my favorite *S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u words from this Lexember include *ajk-u, *kiːs₃-a, m̥os₂-, s₃ajm̥-i, h̩₂soːr, s₃arsun-, eŋ̩ʲ--t-, and m̥ih₂s-u.

Finally, as I'm sure I said before, I'm also a fan of your a posteriori Hlai language. I'm going to have to read up on the family itself at some point! Some of my favorite words from this conlang include kan˩˨, θuyʔ˦˨, θaːyʔ˦˨, ŋʷɯː˧˥, tʰeŋ˨˩, kaːʔ˦˨, van˨˩, (h)han˨˩, and panʔ˦˨.

Oh, and of course, I appreciated that you were able to consistently take the time to comment, even briefly, on other participants' entries!
qwed117 wrote: 02 Dec 2020 10:50 ŋaːnɦ˨˩ n. swan, duck from Proto-Hlai *C-ŋaːnɦ 'goose' *I think the final creaky glottal approximant was intended to be dropped, but I can’t tell, it’s not at least in my notes, and I can’t look at my file from my phone. Update: after looking at my computer, the final approximant was almost certainly intended to be dropped.
cf. Jiamao, Baoting ŋəːn5 'goose'
The "voiced velar - low vowel - [n] - fricative" sequence here reminds me of certain reflexes of *ǵʰh₂éns. Perhaps, as is suggested for the PIE word, *C-ŋaːnɦ is also "of imitative origin".
qwed117 wrote: 03 Dec 2020 10:26 jiang4 /ɕi˥a˧˥ŋ/ v. to see

[…]

With the sound changes I have right now, for one language, the latter becomes haʃars, which I definitely like.

[…]

I dunno where my idea for the triple reflex of Proto-Hlai *hl (*C-l in Ostapirat's notation) came from, but it's actually genius at its core. Behind, the different vowels, *hl has very different results, a trait that it holds in common with *hn. Norquest indicates in Cunhua, *hl becomes tθ. My language probably takes a similar path and goes *hl > tɬ, and then tɬ > tʰ _[aə], which is similar to the unconditional s > t local areal feature, meanwhile, tɬ > ɬ and then ɬ > ɕ _i due to palatization, and then ɬ > l elsewhere. Definitely results in an interesting set of correspondences. In the case of Bouhin, Bouhin actually borrowed these words from Ha Em, and replaced *ɬ with *s and then had the s > t change.

[…]

chigna nf. belt from Latin CINGULA, cf. Sicilian cigna, Albanian qingël, Italian cinghia
When you have something written like <jiang4>, without any hyphens and with just one tone number, but transcribed like /ɕi˥a˧˥ŋ/ (as opposed to /ɕia˥˧˥ŋ/, for instance), might I ask what's going on there? Is this one syllable or two?

I definitely like haʃars as well! I hope to see more of *S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u's descendants in the future, whenever you feel ready to post about them - absolutely no pressure, of course!

Very interesting stuff about this "triple reflex"! I want to make sure I've understood correctly, though. You've written that *hl has different reflexes "behind the different vowels", but then two of the relevant sound changes are formatted as "tɬ > tʰ _[aə]" and "ɬ > ɕ _i". Might I ask what you mean by "behind" vowels? As a completely irrelevant aside, my brain wants to interpret the name "Ostapirat" as "east pirate", although I'm sure its actual etymology is 100% unrelated.

I like how you've included a word in Albanian that was ultimately borrowed from the same source alongside cognates in two other Romance languages. I believe you did something similar with a Portuguese(?) loanword into Javanese as part of another entry.
qwed117 wrote: 06 Dec 2020 05:50 *s₃awdˀ-i v. to trust

[…]

vay˨˩ ptcl 'not' from Proto-Hlai *Curiːɦ 'not' cf. Ha Em gay2 'wife', Baoting hway 'not', Yuanmen vay5 'not',
Totally not inspiring that last word above
I like the word *s₃awdˀ-i, although it definitely makes me think of "Saudi".

Either the gloss for Ha Em gay2 given here is wrong, or we're dealing with a very interesting semantic shift!
qwed117 wrote: 08 Dec 2020 05:50 jëu1-ja4 /ɕɤu˧ɕa˩˥/ n. butterfly, Lepidopterans without any fuzzy scales (sadly not monophyletic, unlike the term 'butterfly'), regional variant, jow1-ca4 /ɕow˧tɕa˩˥/. Coined because I found a tiny dead moth in my room. It didn't have fuzzy scales
I like the notes here, as well as the inclusion of the regional variant. It's also always interesting to hear what may have inspired certain entries!
qwed117 wrote: 10 Dec 2020 04:10 (h)hɔy˩˨ v carry water from Proto-Hlai *hŋwəːyʔ 'carry water' cf. Lauhut hwoːy3, Nadou ŋɔy3, Tongzha, Zandui vaːy6
What does <(h)h> represent? I assume it indicates that the word could be hɔy˩˨ or hhɔy˩˨, but what would <hh> represent?
qwed117 wrote: 13 Dec 2020 05:46 already did a sheeple apparently
lol
Porphyrogenitos:
Spoiler:
Porphyrogenitos wrote: 02 Dec 2020 00:53 Well, I suppose I will jump in and do it. I guess if I don't like what I come up with I can just trash it all and start over. I'll use my metathesis-lang that I posted about in my scratchpad. I'll have to commit to a phoneme inventory for it, at least.
Oh, I believe I remember seeing the post in question. I'll have to revisit it to refresh my memory.
Porphyrogenitos wrote: 02 Dec 2020 00:53 In hasunite, all lexical items are compounds of two bound monosyllabic lexical formatives. Sometimes these are analyzable and sometimes they are not. All lexical formatives are homophonous with other lexical formatives (or, you could say they are polysemous) because of the small syllable inventory (just 44 distinct syllables). All lexical items also participate in a process of metathesis and vowel coalescence in certain contexts. I will provide the metathesized form for each word (predictable from its surface form); the unmetathesized form corresponds to a straightforward IPA reading of the orthography.
Very interesting concept! It's nice to be able to compare the metathesized and un-metathesized forms.
Dormouse559:
Spoiler:
Iluhsa immediately captured my attention at the beginning of last month, and I'm so glad to be able to take the time now to go back and more properly look over everything you've posted about it. I'm absolutely a fan. The look and sound of the language are both very appealing to me, and although certain elements of its aesthetic call certain natlangs or groups of natlangs to mind - <š ž> make me think of certain West and South Slavic languages, <é ó è ò> make me think of certain Romance languages, and <þ ð> remind me of Icelandic, of course - all of these elements together give Iluhsa its own distinctive look, in my opinion. <ġ> for the velar nasal (and voiced velar fricative?)is a nice choice as well. I appreciate all of the protoforms you included, and it was fun trying to work out some of the sound changes that have taken place. Similarly, I enjoyed being able to get a feel for some of the language's morphophonological processes by comparing the surface forms in the example sentences with the underlying forms provided with the glosses below. Finally, before moving on to more specific comments, I want to say that I'm also a fan of what Iluhsa has going on morphosyntactically. Despite the isolating tendencies of the two conlangs I was working with, I definitely tend to prefer more synthetic languages. It was cool seeing new constructions being worked out over the course of the month, and I think I'm going to want to go back over some of the glosses again even after making this post!
Dormouse559 wrote: 02 Dec 2020 01:12 The initial idea for the language was that it would make minimal distinctions between adjectives and abstract nouns, as well as the plurals of concrete nouns. Dòbza, and probably some other color words, falls along that spectrum. The upshot for dòbza is that it can be used either adjectivally (black-colored) or nominally (the color black / blackness), but it doesn't mark number and can't be the subject of a verb.
Dormouse559 wrote: 04 Dec 2020 03:12 The reason that this language merges the plurals of concrete nouns into its adjective/abstract noun spectrum is a quirk of its history. Sound changes made almost all of the language's original plural forms identical to the singular forms, and the ones that remained were so irregular that they tended to get leveled by analogy. The role of the plural was then filled by grammaticalizing a common collective derivation (protolang mave "cat" vs. mavoi "cats" vs. mavoiza "all cats; catkind"). Since the derivation resulted in abstract nouns, plurals became abstract, adjective-y things.

The old plural did stick around in some contexts though. I'll call it paucal. For most nouns, this phenomenon looks like simply a lack of number marking on the noun (Šini mavi. sleep.3S cat The cat sleeps.; Šiniònmi mavi. sleep-3P cat The cats sleep.) But žuhód is one of the nouns that have maintained a distinct paucal, with žut for that form and žuhtira in the plural.
Oh, I love this!
Dormouse559 wrote: 08 Dec 2020 21:09 On the phonology front, I'm instituting a different system of stress assignment. It's simplest to describe with a mixture of syllables and morae: In words of at least three syllables, stress falls on the syllable containing the antepenultimate mora. In words of two syllables or fewer, stress falls on the syllable containing the penultimate mora. The general effect is that stress can be pulled to the right by heavy syllables. For example, the dative form of amuþu is amtido [ˈamtido], with antepenultimate stress; meanwhile the genitive is amtédox [amˈtedox], with the the final consonant coda causing stress to shift to the penult.
Very nice!
Dormouse559 wrote: 12 Dec 2020 07:31 baþi [ˈbaθi] n - sheep (suppletive PL: biznara; < *bautte, *beizənaza)
baþkói [baθˈkoi̯] n - cloud (< baþi + -kói diminutive)
biznara [ˈbiznara] n/adj - herd; livestock (< *beizənaza)
Oh, cool! I think I also derived "cloud" from "sheep" - or vice versa? - in a language of mine ("Y²KS") for Lexember maybe two years ago. [:D]
Dormouse559 wrote: 13 Dec 2020 07:59 kalli [ˈkalli] n - flower (< kʷarəl)
A beautiful word for "flower"!
Dormouse559 wrote: 16 Dec 2020 08:57 kað [ˈkað] n - water (< *kʷad + *-əd, no-longer-productive nominalizer)
kað is outstanding, both for "water" and in general!
Dormouse559 wrote: 17 Dec 2020 07:27 I spent today breaking my brain over the passive voice in a language whose nouns somewhat recently developed ergative case marking while the rest of the language stayed nominative-accusative. Here's what I wrote:

The passive voice is communicated in one of two ways: by adding the suffix -(u)xa or by deleting the ergative subject of a verb. The -(u)xa strategy is mainly used when the patient of the verb is pronominal or when the goal is to form an impersonal construction. These limited uses have to do with the changing grammar of the language. When the language's nouns became morphologically ergative, they lost the accusative case, preventing them from being targeted by the passive voice; pronouns were the only accusative forms that remained. Meanwhile, the passive was also used on intransitive verbs as an impersonal construction, which has survived into the modern language.

[…]

When the direct object is nominal, a passive meaning is communicated by not stating a subject. Whether a single-argument construction is an active intransitive or a passive transitive depends on the transitivity of the verb. Transitivity is treated strictly in the language, but it is often unmarked, in which case it must be learned with the verb.
Oh, interesting! I was wondering what was going on with Iluhsa in terms of alignment.
Dormouse559 wrote: 17 Dec 2020 22:36 héinin [ˈhei̯nin] n - child; offspring or young human (irregular PL: heiniézza; < *poine "birth" + *-en "product of")
Another great word! Seeing <-nin> on a word for a (type of) person makes me think of Japanese.
Dormouse559 wrote: 18 Dec 2020 20:18 hindi [ˈhindi] n - milk (< *pinte)
That's a fun "false friend", or whatever the exact term would be here!
Dormouse559 wrote: 19 Dec 2020 21:22 It occurred to me that iluhsa is a highly irregular word, even by the language's own standards. When it's declined, half of the root, iluh-, just disappears. Notice how iluh + -a becomes ila in the second example sentence. I want to use the -uhsa derivation for other words, but in those cases, I might let analogy even things out.
[+1]
Dormouse559 wrote: 21 Dec 2020 06:25 Not much on Iluhsa for today. Related to this week's theme, I imagine the speakers have or had a focus on the moon. I've decided the language should have a base-14 number system because that's roughly half the number of days in the sidereal month, and the moon's been on my mind lately. BTW, "tetradecimal" is a crime against Greek and Latin.
Dormouse559 wrote: 22 Dec 2020 08:08 Building on what I said yesterday about Iluhsa, I decided on the cardinal numbers. I'm doing a combination of base-14 and base-28. The numbers 1-4 behave mainly like adjectives in that the noun they modify is the head of the phrase. In contrast, higher numbers are more noun‑y, becoming the head of the phrase they appear in while the noun takes the genitive case. These higher numbers also have two forms: one for counting and another for quantifying nouns (I'll list those forms below in that order).

So here are the main numbers I have. I'll put some examples below:

[…]
This is all so cool! [:D]
Dormouse559 wrote: 30 Dec 2020 22:28 arši [ˈarʃi] n - moon (< *arkʷe)

[…]

Funnily enough, I came up with the modern form, arši, first, but it ended up being the etymon that captured my heart. It's so beautiful [:3]
[+1] I also really like vèiti "night", malis "rule, reign; dominate" and its derivations, néli "lamp", niliksi "star", veinmalsin "lunar station" (although I thought we were getting into sci-fi territory at first), kéz "ferment" and its derivations, daur "honey", and èiksa "time (in general); period of time, duration, era; temporal". Actually, I could have just said "all of the words from this post". [:P]
Dormouse559 wrote: 01 Jan 2021 09:11 surti [ˈsurti] v - end, finish, come to an end (< surza + -ti, inchoative)

[…]

In the last two pairs of sentences, note how an abstract noun (like hòumnara and surza) in the locative case communicates a fleeting or changing state, while the same noun in the absolutive implies a lasting or unchanging state.
Is surti an intentional reference to sortir? I like the note about case usage, by the way!
Dormouse559 wrote: 30 Dec 2020 22:28 Get it? "Ferment"? Because the theme is "culture"? [xP]
Dormouse559 wrote: 18 Dec 2020 20:18 For today, I have a word dealing with food. I also have some conjunctions and a negative morpheme, which technically deal in relationships (between words, with the truth [:P] ).
Believe it or not, when I wrote that "players who do choose to follow [the themes] should feel free to interpret them however they'd like", this is exactly the kind of thing I'd hoped to see people doing! [:D]

Well, now for something completely different:

Silvish is unquestionably among my favorite a posteriori conlangs in existence. Seeing it change and develop so much over the years has not only been incredibly interesting, but has also helped to encourage me in my own conlanging. Whenever I come across a post with something translated into or otherwise written in Silvish, I always try to take a moment to look over the accompanying gloss and IPA transcription, along with any other notes there might be, and there aren't many other languages that I'd do that for. So, of course, it was a pleasant surprise to see a few Silvish entries from Lexember 2020.
Dormouse559 wrote: 17 Dec 2020 22:36 I stumbled across a concept for a Silvish word that I came up with in 2013 and then forgot about. Here's the updated form:

Image Silvish

entreçhampâ [ʔɛ̃n.tʁe.hɑ̃ˈpɑː] v - to throw something that will later be retrieved

Lou ppeççheû entreçhampezirön leu ttisuvon.
[lup.pɛˈhœː ʔɛ̃n.tʁe.hɑ̃m.pəˈzi.ʁŋ̩ lœt.ti.syˈvɔ̃ŋ]
DEF-M.C.PL PL-fisherman cast-PST-3P 3P.POS PL-net

The fishermen cast their nets.

Çhakko jhoer jh' entreçhampo la balla avek mui çhen.
[hɑk.kəˈʒuʁ ʒɛ̃n.tʁəˈhɑ̃m.pə laˈbɑl.la ʔaˈvɛk mjyˈhɛ̃ŋ]
every-M.C day 1S.NOM throw-1S DEF-F ball with 1S-POS.OBL dog

I play fetch with my dog every day.

I also had ideas for the word's metaphorical uses in 2013, but I want to let those marinate a bit longer.
This definition feels quite fitting for a word that's been waiting to be "retrieved" for 7 years! [:D] Also, I adore <çh> [h].
Dormouse559 wrote: 21 Dec 2020 06:25 However, I do have some more detailed conculture thoughts for Image Silvish

l' Antonjhe / le Tant' Onjhe [lɑ̃ˈtɔ̃ɲ̟.ʒə | le.tɑ̃ˈtɔ̃ɲ̟.ʒə] - the Antonjhe

The Antonjhe or Tant' Onjhe is a spirit or witch said to frequent the valleys and mountain passes of Silvia. Legends portray her variously as a guardian of travelers or as a deadly menace to them. If you get on her good side, she gives you a seemingly unremarkable gift, like an old boot, that fills with gold when you reach your destination. If you displease her, she traps you in a diabolically complex maze; this behavior explains why she is also called le dona dî labirinto "the lady of the labyrinth". Folk etymologies connect the name Antonjhe with the given name Antoinye (Antonia). Meanwhile, Tant' Onjhe literally means "Aunt Onjhe". However, archeologists have disputed these explanations, linking the Antonjhe to inscriptions found around the region dedicated to the Gaulish goddess Imbetogmia (imbeto- "many" + ogmos "path"; "She of many paths"); they hypothesize that Imbetogmia was a mountain deity, with the labyrinth symbolizing the Alps. The Antonjhe's gifts of money may continue associations with trade, a major element of historical life in the Tarentaise and surrounding valleys.
Fantastic! There's something I really love about this kind of partially pre-Christian Alpine folklore, and you've done a great job of capturing the feel of it, so to speak, here! There are certain elements that I believe I recognize from some other stories of the region, such as the boot full of gold, but there's also a lot that makes the Antonjhe uniquely Silvish.
elemtilas:
Spoiler:
elemtilas wrote: 02 Dec 2020 03:34 (iri) 1. siados, a dappling of shadow & light, of muted & vibrant colours: shades of blacks, deep reds, oranges, creams, whites, greys; a pattern found on several kinds of domestic & wild fox, dog, and cat; a garment made from such a pelt or woven stuffs in imitation thereof.
elemtilas wrote: 03 Dec 2020 02:04 (uta) 2. ôrlancos: a colour so deep, so saturated, so huesome that it becomes another colour: a purple so rich it's blue; a green so deep it's glas; a glas so rich it's grey; a grey so deep it's black; a black so rich it's red; pantochromaticity; the transmutation of colour such that not one colour, nor hue, nor tint dominates, but that all colours together amalgamate into one
elemtilas wrote: 03 Dec 2020 06:02 (tûr)
3a. culclôs: an ordinary shape; an artifact of ordinary geometry; geometric perfection: the circle

3b. calaprêster: a superordinary shape; an artifact of metageometry; the squared-circle
elemtilas wrote: 04 Dec 2020 16:44 (sita)
4. coro: score, num 20; io
muria: fourend, num 400; i,oo
pacan: num 8000; io,oo
oras: great fourend, num 160,000; i,oo,oo

sitacoro pula: four score and seven; 47
Quite an aesthetically pleasing and semantically interesting batch of words!
silvercat:
Spoiler:
I must admit I'm not very well-acquainted with your languages, but after this month I think I've become familiar with the names and general aesthetics of at least a few of them.

This may be a silly question, but based on the presence of "cat" in your username, I'm curious: is the name "Maanxmusht" at all related to the Manx cat breed, or is it just a coincidence?

I particularly like the sound and etymology of dzashka /dzaʃ.ka/ and ʀiuʃiolʃdi /ʀiu.ʃi.olʃ.di/, respectively.
silvercat wrote: 26 Dec 2020 02:31 To almost catch up, all the words I currently have for Ntukso, the language that invented the runes. Each of these are also the name of the rune/letter they start with.

10. oddo /ˈɔːd.dɔ/ (horse)
11. vjivrw /ˈvjɨːð.ɾu/ (person)
12. ikaha /ɨ.ˈka.haː/ (river)
13. moriaddr /nɔ.ˈrɨad.dɨ̥r/ (hall, home)
14. fwdis /θu.ˈdɨs/ (chicken)
15. rikaddvof /ˈrɨː.kaːd.ðɔθ/ (fire)
16. whsaivroʀ /uh.ˈsaɨːð.ɾɔʀ/ (boat)
17. damjss /da.ˈmiːz/ (day)
18. savis /ˈtsaː.vɨs/ (summer)
19. akksia /ˈaːk.sɨa/ (magic spell)
20. kiavsa /ˈkɨaːv.sa/ (food, meal)
21. bajbaharm /ˈbai.ba.haːɾm/ (harvest)
22. jirss /ˈjɨɾz/ (night)
23. ʀosaok /ʀɔː.ˈsaɔk/ (tree, trunk)
24. hiriah /hɨː.ˈɾɨah/ (hunger, need)
Cool!
silvercat wrote: 01 Jan 2021 05:18 28 Ŋyjichɯn: lɒikyɒtɯa /wɒi.'tyɒ.pɯa/
Interesting how all the vowels here seem to be spelled as they're pronounced, but none of the consonants are! At least when comparing graphemes to IPA symbols, that is.
KaiTheHomoSapien:
Spoiler:
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 02 Dec 2020 07:45 I decided that I am going to really try and use Arculese for Lexember so I can develop this language further.
I enjoyed being introduced to this language, so to speak, over the course of the month. I quite like the look of it! As a side note, I've also been reminded that I don't believe I'm "caught up" with the material you've posted about Lihmelinyan.

There were too many aesthetically pleasing or otherwise interesting words and cultural notes for me to list them all out here, but here are some of my favorites:
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 03 Dec 2020 04:20 Kumathássā - surname, "green hill"

[…]

Cf. Thannicort (Thannikórtom), capital of Arculy, lit. "ivory tower".
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 07 Dec 2020 21:43 aúros - masc. - circle, cycle

[…]

The Arculese word for "eight" is péntā, which is a bit confusing given its resemblence to the Greek word for "five". (Cf. Lihmelinyan kuéntā).
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 09 Dec 2020 18:12 sárinth - masc. - lily

I've posited that Arculese contains an -nth noun suffix similar to the "Aegean" substrate in Greek that's the source of words like labyrinth, Corinth, etc.

[…]

álpos - masc. - bear

This word is an "Easter egg" in that it's derived from what should be the Greek descendant of PIE *wĺ̥kʷos.
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 12 Dec 2020 18:07 sórgīn - masc. - valley

A sórgīn (pronounced /'sɔr.çiːn/) is a wide, open valley (cf. Lihmelinyan sárgēn) as opposed to a small or narrow river valley. The "Vale of Arculis" from which the region of Arculy derives its name is natively called the Sórgīn Arkuleís.
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 19 Dec 2020 21:31 vépos - house, home

There are other words referring to a house as a building, but vepos is the only one that can mean "home". Frequently used in the allative, vépa, meaning "home[ward]" as an adverb.

Example: I am walking home.

Vépa língāmi.
house-ALL walk-1.SG.PRES.ACT
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 24 Dec 2020 19:10 Katéstā - name of goddess. Katesta is the nature goddess, associated with the color green and the spring time. The Arculese city Katéstavōr (located in the Sélbis region) is named for her. (-vōr is a suffix found in city names ultimately derived from a word for "city", vórom). The Mantians believe the gods come down to earth to test or help people; Katéstā is said to often take the form of a young woman or girl in the woods in shimmering white dress illuminated by sunlight. According to legend, if you see her and try to follow her, she's impossible to catch up with but you'll find she's led you to fresh water or a way out of the woods if you're lost.

[…]

sarpāmi - I consecrate, dedicate, sacrifice

This common verb of religion has a few different meanings and is of obscure origin. It is somewhat archaic and appears mainly in formal and ritual texts.

[…]

siókos - masc. - temple

Cf. Lihmelinyan šákā

Example sentence: We walked to the temples of the city.

Siókōsde vórosjo língātomu.
temple-ALL.PL city-GEN.SG. walk-1.PL.PAST

[…]

daíkīr - masc. - priest
daíkrī - fem. - priestess (daikīr + -ī feminine suffix)

Cf. Lihmelinyan taíhēr

Example sentence: The priest consecrated the bread in the temple.

Dáikīr blétom siókei sárpād.
priest-NOM bread-ACC temple-LOC consecrate-3.SG.PAST

Note that Arculese has no augment and the verbs have been greatly reanalyzed in comparison with the archaic Lihmelinyan verbal system.

[…]

Gelānnes - "Origins" (lit. "beginnings" from gelāmi "I begin") - name of one of the three principle religious texts used in the Mantian religion. The Book of Origins is primarily mythological and is the longest of the three books.
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 30 Dec 2020 19:37 keírūmi - I believe, trust

A common verb of religious ritual, it also simply means "trust" and is used to refer to both religious belief but also trust in a friend.

[…]

tētuom - neut. - story, fable, folktale, myth

Can mean all of the above depending on the context. Mantians highly regard the myths written down in the three sacred texts but there are many stories that build on these and are not "canon" but have wide circulation and popularity.

[…]

borégom - neut. - journey, quest

The word simply means "journey, trip" but has come to refer to a specific solitary rite of passage related to wandering. Its origins are archaic and may be derived from tribal coming of age rituals; in modern Manter it's become a spiritual journey of meditation undertaken by adolescents, particularly those going into religious orders.

[…]

sármenos - masc. - master of ceremonies

Derived from a verb meaning "to officiate, to watch over". The sármenos is responsible for maintaining religious protocol and ritual and oversees religious ceremonies.

[…]

vánitīr - fem. - holiday, festival, celebration
vaniāmi - I celebrate, rejoice

The noun is derived from the verb. Refers to any religious or secular festival. Mantians have many, including one each month dedicated to each of the 12 principal deities.

[…]

ókanth - masc. - calendar, clock, measure

ókanth comes from a root meaning "to measure" but has come to mean both calendar and "clock". Mechanical clocks as we understand them have not yet been invented in Manter, but sundials, water clocks, and other means of measuring duration of time do exist and this word can describe them. I based the Mantian calendar on the French Revolutionary calendar (because why not).
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 01 Jan 2021 05:57 ápīr - masc. - year
Shemtov:
Spoiler:
Shemtov wrote: 04 Dec 2020 21:57 I will be doing Classical/Cuātlicañ Court Momṭẓʿālemeōm and Maillys concurently, as I am saying they are very distantly related, both from seperate invasions from another continent to the south, which both spoke languages of the same family, albeit distantly related branches.
Very nice! It was interesting trying to compare these two distant relatives throughout the month. I'm definitely a fan of Momṭẓʿālemeōm and its partially Nahuatl-inspired aesthetic in particular.

Additionally, it's always nice to see notes such as these:
Shemtov wrote: 08 Dec 2020 06:15 Day 8:
Maillys: LLyubhaić-Ćá "Tea (drink)"
Note: Ćá is a Fuheko loan word of Kanic origin, for the tea plant. While most words for tea have Fuhean origin (Cogućá "black tea leaves" Ćájó "fresh tea leaves") the drink, and also tomorrow's word have native modifiers- the Maill tried to import cacao, but given that it could only be grown in the southwest portion of their territory, it was replaced by tea, and the drink was named after what it replaced culturally.
Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Tleopāch "Cacao"
Shemtov wrote: 09 Dec 2020 06:34 Day 8:
Maillys: Cuhyuthyĺ-Ćá "Chewing Tea"- a form of tea similiar to IRL White Tea, but meant to be chewed, taken at tea-chewing breaks, and when boiling is impractical. Cuhyuthyl was originally tobacco, which was exclusively chewed, with tea drunk at meals, but when it was realized that tea could be prepared as a chew, the Maill slowly phased out tobacco so they could rely on their tea crop, and not have to plant tobacco.

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Cojuītl "Tobacco"
Shemtov wrote: 10 Dec 2020 06:35 Day 9:
Maillys: Sácyll "stork"

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Atzʿāṭl "Mythical bird, resembling a flamingo, similiar to the IRL phoenix myth, but that extinguishes its fire by leaping into the water, and the steam forming new birds when over land. Based on memories of flamingos from their original territory, plus native myths of the land they conquered"
This last one has reminded me that I'll have to try to check out the relevant mythology thread you've started recently.
Linguifex:
Spoiler:
Linguifex wrote: 06 Dec 2020 13:03 I completely suck at being timely and consistent with challenges like these. For the language, let's go with CT.

Lexember 1: CT tïhki [tɯ̀hkì] (pl. ituhki [ìdùhkì]) 'tunic, shirt'

Lexember 2: CT łámágn [ɬǽmǽɣn̩] 'ocean water' (which is red on Ítöð, as opposed to fresh water, which is blue)

Lexember 3: CT téurú [téùɹú] (pl. éturú [édùɹú]) 'base of a gap between the fingers; fork (in road), split; dilemma, set of options'

Lexember 4: CT mántëg [mǽndɤ̀x] (pl. ámntëg [ǽmn̩dɤ̀x]) 'uvula'

Lexember 5: CT kéré [kéɹé] (pl. ékré [égɹé]) 'knuckle'

Lexember 6: CT kaĝlatuh [kæ̀ŋlàdùh] (pl. akĝlatuh [àkŋ̩làdùh]) 'squall line'
No worries about timing or consistency! Thanks for sharing these words with us! The singular and plural forms are fun to compare. I particularly like the different usages of téurú and the conworlding note that came along with łámágn.
kiwikami:
Spoiler:
Alál is a language that I've "passively" enjoyed seeing around on the board for a while now, so to speak, but maybe this year I'll finally remember to take the time to read more about it, as I believe there is a thread.

I quite like how Alál generally looks and sounds, but I'm still always delightfully surprised to be reminded of how the orthography corresponds to the pronunciation. kıḳaḷı /ˈkɛŋəd͡ɮɪ/ and tsızìalı /tsɛˈʃeʕɮɪ/ are probably my favorite examples of this out of this batch of words.

Some etymologies I'm particularly fond of:
kiwikami wrote: 09 Dec 2020 04:23 ṭìmat /ɪˈtʼemət/
'triangle (shape)'
AGT ṭìmıut | PAT ṭìmàut
Declension class NA3 | Handling class muŕ or zuŕ
From ṬIT 'tooth' and -ma- 'visual abstraction'.

[…]

ḳahàl /ŋəˈçɑɬ/
'mannequin'
AGT ḳahíla | PAT ḳahùla
Declension class A3 | Handling class maŕ
From ḲAL 'corpse' and -h- 'equivalent'

[…]

zaluḷ /ˈʃɐɮʉ̞t͡ɬ/
'monkey, small ape'
AGT zalıuḷ | PAT zalàuḷ
Declension class NU2 | Handling class lıŕ
From ẒAḶ 'hand' and -lu- 'animal'.
Click:
Spoiler:
I don't believe I'd encountered this language before seeing your post last month, but I'm definitely a fan of Corcyran, as well as your overall style of presenting it. Some of the "highlights" from that post, in my opinion, include the origins of the 5th verb conjugation, the cultural/culinary notes, the uncertain etymology of lımasón, and the final consonant of amón. Thanks for sharing this batch of words here in the thread!
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

shimobaatar wrote: 07 Jan 2021 04:27
Dormouse559 wrote: 12 Dec 2020 07:31 baþi [ˈbaθi] n - sheep (suppletive PL: biznara; < *bautte, *beizənaza)
baþkói [baθˈkoi̯] n - cloud (< baþi + -kói diminutive)
biznara [ˈbiznara] n/adj - herd; livestock (< *beizənaza)
Oh, cool! I think I also derived "cloud" from "sheep" - or vice versa? - in a language of mine ("Y²KS") for Lexember maybe two years ago. [:D]
[O.O]
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 67,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien »

shimobaatar wrote: 07 Jan 2021 04:27 I enjoyed being introduced to this language, so to speak, over the course of the month. I quite like the look of it! As a side note, I've also been reminded that I don't believe I'm "caught up" with the material you've posted about Lihmelinyan.
Thanks shimo [:D]

That's my fault because I've presented Lihmelinyan in such a piecemeal incomplete way. Partly because I'm such an indecisive perfectionist I can't make up my mind about anything and nothing I come up with is ever good enough for me. I'm thinking of starting a new thread for Arculese though. On the fence about it--it's hard to focus on a new conlang!
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by silvercat »

I must admit I'm not very well-acquainted with your languages, but after this month I think I've become familiar with the names and general aesthetics of at least a few of them.

This may be a silly question, but based on the presence of "cat" in your username, I'm curious: is the name "Maanxmusht" at all related to the Manx cat breed, or is it just a coincidence?

I particularly like the sound and etymology of dzashka /dzaʃ.ka/ and ʀiuʃiolʃdi /ʀiu.ʃi.olʃ.di/, respectively.

28 Ŋyjichɯn: lɒikyɒtɯa /wɒi.'tyɒ.pɯa/
Interesting how all the vowels here seem to be spelled as they're pronounced, but none of the consonants are! At least when comparing graphemes to IPA symbols, that is.
My username and pretty much all my languages are inspired the 80s cartoon, Thundercats. Maanxmusht is half coincidence, half me being silly. It also basically means 'children of the corn'.

Most of my languages are pretty new. Ŋyjichɯn is my oldest and most developed one, which admittedly isn't saying that much. Ŋyjichɯn has some pretty extensive alternation, I think it's just that word that doesn't have much change in the vowels.
my pronouns: they/them or e/em/eirs/emself
Main conlang: Ŋyjichɯn. Other conlangs: Tsɑkø (naming language), Ie, Tynthna, Maanxmuʃt, Ylialis
All my conlangs
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elemtilas
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by elemtilas »

shimobaatar wrote: 07 Jan 2021 04:27 elemtilas:

Quite an aesthetically pleasing and semantically interesting batch of words!
Thanks!

Sadly, Lexember kind of fell by the wayside this time! :( But kudos to all those who did finish!
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Response to shimo
Spoiler:
shimobaatar wrote: 07 Jan 2021 04:27 qwed117:
Spoiler:
First, I was once again very impressed with your dedication to keeping up with Sardinian throughout the month while simultaneously coining words for three conlangs every day. Honestly, the fact that you're studying Sardinian itself is impressive; there can't be too many resources out there, I'd imagine. I didn't end up having the time or energy for anything like that myself this time around, but I suppose we'll see how things go for Lexember 2021. Some of my favorite Sardinian words that you shared with us last month include perca~pelcia~pescia~preca~percia, paristória, giana, duene, and ocannu.

Second, as I believe I've said, I like the generally look and feel of your a priori Hlai-inspired language. Certain orthographic choices, such as <j> for /ɕ/, are particularly appealing to me. I'll have to try to remember to check out the post you've made on it over in your scratchpad thread soon. Some of my favorite words from this language include hëi3 yo1, mő2, höl1, may4, jó2, bòy2~-bòy, myang2, sèi2, hwòy2, am2-am2, wai3-yang2, guay3, jong3, kòi1, bay3-yang2, mi2-ya3, hő4, müy4, jé3-yo1, möy1-hé2, hë3, haw2-yë4, yòu2, ja1, mű2, söw1-hyá4, khǒ1, and òi2.

Third, it was nice to see more of *S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u. I think I still have to get "caught up" with some of the more recent posts in the thread for it, actually. Some of my favorite *S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u words from this Lexember include *ajk-u, *kiːs₃-a, m̥os₂-, s₃ajm̥-i, h̩₂soːr, s₃arsun-, eŋ̩ʲ--t-, and m̥ih₂s-u.

Finally, as I'm sure I said before, I'm also a fan of your a posteriori Hlai language. I'm going to have to read up on the family itself at some point! Some of my favorite words from this conlang include kan˩˨, θuyʔ˦˨, θaːyʔ˦˨, ŋʷɯː˧˥, tʰeŋ˨˩, kaːʔ˦˨, van˨˩, (h)han˨˩, and panʔ˦˨.

Oh, and of course, I appreciated that you were able to consistently take the time to comment, even briefly, on other participants' entries! I have a lot of work to do with Sngdo Latu and its descendants, which I have been putting off like no tomorrow (or well, like a lot of tomorrows)
Thanks, man, it means a lot! I ended up learning a lot culturally about the region. I never learnt about duendes in Spanish class, so this was really a new thing (along with giana and its connection to Diana). I really liked your stuff too.

shimobaatar wrote: 07 Jan 2021 04:27
qwed117 wrote: 02 Dec 2020 10:50 ŋaːnɦ˨˩ n. swan, duck from Proto-Hlai *C-ŋaːnɦ 'goose' *I think the final creaky glottal approximant was intended to be dropped, but I can’t tell, it’s not at least in my notes, and I can’t look at my file from my phone. Update: after looking at my computer, the final approximant was almost certainly intended to be dropped.
cf. Jiamao, Baoting ŋəːn5 'goose'
The "voiced velar - low vowel - [n] - fricative" sequence here reminds me of certain reflexes of *ǵʰh₂éns. Perhaps, as is suggested for the PIE word, *C-ŋaːnɦ is also "of imitative origin".
It's possible, but it originates in Old Chinese 雁 *ŋraːns, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *ŋa-n.
shimobaatar wrote: 07 Jan 2021 04:27
qwed117 wrote: 03 Dec 2020 10:26 jiang4 /ɕi˥a˧˥ŋ/ v. to see

[…]

With the sound changes I have right now, for one language, the latter becomes haʃars, which I definitely like.

[…]

I dunno where my idea for the triple reflex of Proto-Hlai *hl (*C-l in Ostapirat's notation) came from, but it's actually genius at its core. Behind, the different vowels, *hl has very different results, a trait that it holds in common with *hn. Norquest indicates in Cunhua, *hl becomes tθ. My language probably takes a similar path and goes *hl > tɬ, and then tɬ > tʰ _[aə], which is similar to the unconditional s > t local areal feature, meanwhile, tɬ > ɬ and then ɬ > ɕ _i due to palatization, and then ɬ > l elsewhere. Definitely results in an interesting set of correspondences. In the case of Bouhin, Bouhin actually borrowed these words from Ha Em, and replaced *ɬ with *s and then had the s > t change.

[…]

chigna nf. belt from Latin CINGULA, cf. Sicilian cigna, Albanian qingël, Italian cinghia
When you have something written like <jiang4>, without any hyphens and with just one tone number, but transcribed like /ɕi˥a˧˥ŋ/ (as opposed to /ɕia˥˧˥ŋ/, for instance), might I ask what's going on there? Is this one syllable or two?

I definitely like haʃars as well! I hope to see more of *S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u's descendants in the future, whenever you feel ready to post about them - absolutely no pressure, of course!

Very interesting stuff about this "triple reflex"! I want to make sure I've understood correctly, though. You've written that *hl has different reflexes "behind the different vowels", but then two of the relevant sound changes are formatted as "tɬ > tʰ _[aə]" and "ɬ > ɕ _i". Might I ask what you mean by "behind" vowels? As a completely irrelevant aside, my brain wants to interpret the name "Ostapirat" as "east pirate", although I'm sure its actual etymology is 100% unrelated.

I like how you've included a word in Albanian that was ultimately borrowed from the same source alongside cognates in two other Romance languages. I believe you did something similar with a Portuguese(?) loanword into Javanese as part of another entry.
Diphthongs in the language are treated like long vowels. Theoretically the tone contour could be written at the end of the syllable, but the tone changes during the diphthong, generally so that the later glide is primarily centered on the second element. I'm still trying to get to a more comfortable state with the language, especially since I changed the language to favor syllabic laryngeals.

Regarding the triple reflex, the big thing is that *hl can reflect in three different ways, depending on the vowels that proceed it, roughly so that *ɬ -> {tʰ ɕ l} {_aə _i _}, that is that *hla ->tʰa, *hli -> ɕi, *hlo -> lo. I can't tell where Ostapirat's name originates from, but I would highly suspect it to be from some Kra-Dai language or a similar language from the region. Probably not "East Pirate". [:P]

Also for the meme potential in one of them I put three cognates in languages that were all non-Romance.
qwed117 wrote: 06 Dec 2020 05:50 *s₃awdˀ-i v. to trust

[…]

vay˨˩ ptcl 'not' from Proto-Hlai *Curiːɦ 'not' cf. Ha Em gay2 'wife', Baoting hway 'not', Yuanmen vay5 'not',
Totally not inspiring that last word above
I like the word *s₃awdˀ-i, although it definitely makes me think of "Saudi".

Either the gloss for Ha Em gay2 given here is wrong, or we're dealing with a very interesting semantic shift![/quote]
That's me copy-pasting a previous post to get a template, and not properly deleting the gloss. It means 'not' (or at least, that's the value that the dictionary gives to it within proto-Hlai (and then never notes otherwise for any other language.


shimobaatar wrote: 07 Jan 2021 04:27
qwed117 wrote: 08 Dec 2020 05:50 jëu1-ja4 /ɕɤu˧ɕa˩˥/ n. butterfly, Lepidopterans without any fuzzy scales (sadly not monophyletic, unlike the term 'butterfly'), regional variant, jow1-ca4 /ɕow˧tɕa˩˥/. Coined because I found a tiny dead moth in my room. It didn't have fuzzy scales
I like the notes here, as well as the inclusion of the regional variant. It's also always interesting to hear what may have inspired certain entries!
qwed117 wrote: 10 Dec 2020 04:10 (h)hɔy˩˨ v carry water from Proto-Hlai *hŋwəːyʔ 'carry water' cf. Lauhut hwoːy3, Nadou ŋɔy3, Tongzha, Zandui vaːy6
What does <(h)h> represent? I assume it indicates that the word could be hɔy˩˨ or hhɔy˩˨, but what would <hh> represent?
qwed117 wrote: 13 Dec 2020 05:46 already did a sheeple apparently
lol
I dunno how deep I'll go with the regional variations, but it was fun to think about that, even if I wasn't creating a proto-lang with it as well. In my sca2 text, /s/ and /h/ show up geminated (I'm not sure why I chose that). I don't really know why I did that, but right now I'm retconning as a sort of morphophonemic gemination that appears behind open syllables, ie making /ŋʷɯː˧˥/ 'spirit' + /(h)hɔy˩˨/ 'carry water' to be something more like [ŋʷɯːh˧˥ hɔy˩˨].

My sheeples are sad :( need more sheeple
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

Another response to shimo [:P]
Spoiler:
shimobaatar wrote: 07 Jan 2021 04:27 Iluhsa immediately captured my attention at the beginning of last month, and I'm so glad to be able to take the time now to go back and more properly look over everything you've posted about it. I'm absolutely a fan.

[…]

Silvish is unquestionably among my favorite a posteriori conlangs in existence. Seeing it change and develop so much over the years has not only been incredibly interesting, but has also helped to encourage me in my own conlanging. Whenever I come across a post with something translated into or otherwise written in Silvish, I always try to take a moment to look over the accompanying gloss and IPA transcription, along with any other notes there might be, and there aren't many other languages that I'd do that for. So, of course, it was a pleasant surprise to see a few Silvish entries from Lexember 2020.
Thank you for your kind comments! I appreciate you taking the time to look at my posts [:3]

shimobaatar wrote: 07 Jan 2021 04:27The look and sound of the language are both very appealing to me, and although certain elements of its aesthetic call certain natlangs or groups of natlangs to mind - <š ž> make me think of certain West and South Slavic languages, <é ó è ò> make me think of certain Romance languages, and <þ ð> remind me of Icelandic, of course - all of these elements together give Iluhsa its own distinctive look, in my opinion. <ġ> for the velar nasal (and voiced velar fricative?)is a nice choice as well.
Ooh, yay! With Iluhsa, I'm giving a lot of weight to my personal sense of what looks and sounds good. <ġ> started out representing the voiced velar fricative, but I eventually altered the sound changes to make it the velar nasal.

On stress: I have simplified the stress assignment. Now, stress falls on the syllable containing the penultimate mora, or on the initial syllable in a word with fewer than three morae. I ended up wanting to moderate the stress movement slightly when it came to adding suffixes to disyllables. The previous system went like this, with hypothetical páta > paták > pátaka. The current one keeps the stress on the initial syllable in all three forms instead of shifting it back and forth: páta > pátak > pátaka.

On alignment and plural: We'll see where that goes. I've been thinking about it a lot since I made that post on the passive voice, and it may need some rejiggering. It could be that ergative alignment will be more limited, triggered by plural subjects; that will at least have been the case at some point in the language's past.
shimobaatar wrote:Oh, cool! I think I also derived "cloud" from "sheep" - or vice versa? - in a language of mine ("Y²KS") for Lexember maybe two years ago. [:D]
Vocab buddies! [xD]
shimobaatar wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote: 18 Dec 2020 20:18 hindi [ˈhindi] n - milk (< *pinte)
That's a fun "false friend", or whatever the exact term would be here!
Yeah, I'd say "false friend" fits. I hadn't intended to get that particular wordform when I came up with the etymon, but *pinte just sounds like a word for "milk" to me (maybe I'm thinking of English "pint").

shimobaatar wrote:Is surti an intentional reference to sortir? I like the note about case usage, by the way!
No, not consciously anyway. Come to think of it, I don't remember how I arrived at that root. I did look at various natlangs for ideas, but I don't remember if any actually ended up being a model for the final product.
shimobaatar wrote:Believe it or not, when I wrote that "players who do choose to follow [the themes] should feel free to interpret them however they'd like", this is exactly the kind of thing I'd hoped to see people doing! [:D]
Heheh :mrgreen: Glad I could meet your expectations!

shimobaatar wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote: 17 Dec 2020 22:36 I stumbled across a concept for a Silvish word that I came up with in 2013 and then forgot about. Here's the updated form:

Image Silvish

entreçhampâ [ʔɛ̃n.tʁe.hɑ̃ˈpɑː] v - to throw something that will later be retrieved

[…]
This definition feels quite fitting for a word that's been waiting to be "retrieved" for 7 years! [:D] Also, I adore <çh> [h].
Ah, I hadn't thought about how well the meaning fits. Serendipity! Yeah, <çh> is one of the workhorses of Silvish orthography; the dialect I'm using pronounces it [h], but as I build out the other dialects, there will be ones that pronounce it [ʃ], [θ], [ts], even [st].
shimobaatar wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote: 21 Dec 2020 06:25 However, I do have some more detailed conculture thoughts for Image Silvish

l' Antonjhe / le Tant' Onjhe [lɑ̃ˈtɔ̃ɲ̟.ʒə | le.tɑ̃ˈtɔ̃ɲ̟.ʒə] - the Antonjhe

[…]
Fantastic! There's something I really love about this kind of partially pre-Christian Alpine folklore, and you've done a great job of capturing the feel of it, so to speak, here! There are certain elements that I believe I recognize from some other stories of the region, such as the boot full of gold, but there's also a lot that makes the Antonjhe uniquely Silvish.
That's great; you're getting exactly the impression I'd hoped for. The boot of gold should be familiar for you since I pulled that detail from Wild Hunt stories [;)] The labyrinth part actually came from a hypothesized antecedent of Ariadne, who had the epithet "mistress of the labyrinth". That was just so evocative that I kept it in mind to use later even though I didn't yet know what for. Eventually, the Alps metaphor clicked, and I came up with a combination of Gaulish roots I liked, so here we are.
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