Lexember 2020

A forum for all topics related to constructed languages
Khemehekis
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

Iyionaku wrote: 28 Dec 2020 11:15 A few pieces of food from cristlovenúm (christmas market) today!

asoldap [ɐˈsoːldɐp] - cotton candy
Etymology: from asól "sugar" + dap "foam", literally "sugar foam"

dresdenól [dɾesdəˈnoːl] - stollen [sweet German bread with raisins and icing sugar]
Etymology: from Dresden + -ól, a suffix used in many candies

langoy [ˈlaŋgɔ̈ʃ] - lángos
Etymology: From Hungarian Lángos

lècanvendats [ˈlɛkɐnˌvendɐt͡s] - bratwurst
Etymology: lècan "sausage" + venda "to fry" + adjectivizer -ts

medvedsól [ˌmedvədˈsoːl] - burnt almonds
Etymology: from medved "almond" + -sól, a suffix used in many candies

nurnbergól [nʉɾnbəɾˈgoːl] - gingerbread, lebkuchen
Etymology: from Nürnberg + -ól, a suffix used in many candies

sèrtersól [ˌsɛrtəɾˈsoːl] - crêpe
Etymology: sèrter "pan" + -sól, a suffix used in many candies

vinpulvon [ˈvinˌpulvɔ̈n] - mulled wine
Etymology: from vin "foreign wine" + pulvon "hot"
I know what stollen and lebkuchen are, but I've never heard of langos. Is that a Hungarian food?

EDIT: Any word for "pfeffernuss"?
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qwed117
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 28th
mű2 /mɯː˥/ n feast, banquet, a dinner
ğay4 /ɰaj˩˥/ ptcl INCHOATIVE

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
wes-a v 'to defeat, to conquer'

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
hawʔ˦˨ v 'descend' from Proto- Hlai *tʃʰuːʔ 'descend', cf. Lauhut tsʰaw3, Cunhua hay3

Sardinian
naschida nf 'birth' from Vulgar Latin NASCO, from Classical Latin NASCOR
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

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Iyionaku
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Khemehekis wrote: 28 Dec 2020 22:35
I know what stollen and lebkuchen are, but I've never heard of langos. Is that a Hungarian food?

EDIT: Any word for "pfeffernuss"?
Yep! It's a a deep fried flatbread with sour cream, cheese and garlic (and other variants) that for some reason surfaced on every Christmas Market in my region. And no, I don't have a word for pfeffernuss, as it's not common at all where I'm from. But now, that I'm at it, I will add it to my lexicon as iʻensokól, which is simply a loan translation from "pepper" and "nut".

Lexember 29th - Yélian

cerenpèsceren [kəɾənˈpɛskəɾən] - gradually, step by step, bit by bit, one at a time, by degrees
Etymology: ceren "step" + pès "to, towards"; literally "step to step"

Nat yiperoyai u'piano, yaipiritbai èpa yiaupalevai, cut cerenpèsceren yifirtreyai èpa carat ocoyai can reo clezemiato!
[nɐt ɕɨpəˈɾoːʃaɪ̯ ʉˈpɪ̯aːno, ʃaɪ̯ˈpiːɾɨbaɪ̯ ˈɛpɐ ɕɪ̯aʊ̯pɐˈleːʋaɪ̯, kʉt‿əɾənˈpɛskəɾən ɕɨɸɨɾtˈɾeːʃaɪ̯ ˈɛpɐ ˈkaːɾɐt ɔ̈ˈkoːʃaɪ̯ kɐn ˈɾeː.o ˈkleːɟəˌmɪ̯aːto]
when INGR-learn-1SG DEF.INAN=piano, PST-very-bad-COP.1SG and PST-often-make_mistake{music}-1SG, but gradully PST-improve-1SG and now prepare-1SG for 1SG.POSS concert-first
When I started to learn the piano, I was very bad and played wrong notes often, but step by step I improved and now I'm practising for my first concert!

Bonus word :esp:

paso [ˈpaso] - step
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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Jackk
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

29m Decembr
sboc /sbɔk/ [zbɔk] smirk, insincere smile, smug expression
also sboccar /sboˈkar/ [zbʊˈkɑː] to smirk, smile insincerely, be smug
< the verb is original, dating back to the ninth centry in Old Boral isboccar [is.bokˈkar] “to scoff at, mock, deride”, one of the few examples of the intensive/pejorative is-…-ar verbal derivation that survives into modern use (another is slançar “to rush, speed, hurry”). The prefix is- is from Latin ex- “out, away, throughout, thoroughly”. The core noun boc “mouth” comes with little change from Vulgar Latin bucca “mouth” < “jawbone, cheek”, of Gaulish origin. The deverbal noun sboc is attested from the thirteenth century.

L'instroyour au un sboc y fascandessem.
The teacher had the most annoying smirk.
/ˌlɪn.stroˈjur o ɪn ˈsbɔk i ˌfa.xanˈdɛ.sɛm/
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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qwed117
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 29th
söw1-hyá4 /səw˧j̊aː˩˥/ n holiday, holy day, feast day
phí3-jáng2 /pʰiː˧˩˥ɕaːŋ˥/ v to take a break, to rest
his2-yang4 /xis˥jaŋ˩˥/ v to tire, to become exhausted, to feel sleepy

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
eŋ̩ʲ--t- cfxc Noun-Verb circumfix, denoting creation* ie sth like bˀik-o 'stone' + eŋ̩ʲ--t- = eŋ̩ʲbˀikt- 'to harden'

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
(h)han˨˩ 'coin' from Proto- Hlai *hŋwən 'silver coin', possibly from Proto-Hlai *hŋwən 'silver', cf. Cunhua kon4, Nadouhua kanʔ4, Bouhin ŋen1, Ha Em, Lauhut kan1, Tongzha, Baoting, Yuanmen kan4

Sardinian
afestare v 'to celebrate' from Classical Latin FESTA
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 29

Gán Vẽi (Entry 29):

Gán Vẽi /ɣan˩˧ vej˧˩/ (animate)
Noun:
1. a name for the language, especially the standard variety
2. any standard or prestigious language
3. koine, lingua franca
4. folk music, folk song
5. oral literature, oral history

Etymology
From gán "throat, front of the neck, voice" + vẽi "common, general, public, communal".
gán is from Old TBD t·kan "throat, voice", from Proto-TBD *to "to take, to receive, to accept" + *ka "all, full, complete" + *ni "tube, pipe, column".
vẽi is from Old TBD l·uêih "familial, shared, common", from Proto-TBD *look "large, great" + *wir "family, lineage, household" + *xo "face, appearance".
Usage notes
Despite not being politically united under a single state, speakers of Gán Vẽi see themselves as members of a single ethnic group, although that group is divided into seven distinct "lineages". These lineages roughly correspond to different geographic regions, but there are more independent states than lineages, and political boundaries rarely correspond very well to those of these ethnic subgroups. Each lineage has its own characteristic accent or dialect - the reality of the situation is, of course, more complicated, but this is the way speakers believe things to be. At this point in time, the degree of mutual intelligibility between any two varieties of the language is still likely to be greater than 50% - all dialects share more or less the same (initial) consonant inventory and are very similar in terms of word order as well, but vowels, tones, final consonants, and verbal enclitics tend to be somewhat more variable.

Nevertheless, as part of a collaborative effort between the governments of the various different states, a standardized "lingua franca" of sorts was codified and is now used for all official international communication. It has also become the language of education, government, and organized religion within individual states. Gán Vẽi, originally a name for the spoken language in all of its regional forms, now refers first and foremost to this standardized, high-prestige variety - both spoken and written. It's not exactly anyone's native language, but as it was first codified relatively recently, is periodically "updated" over time, and isn't seen as perfect or divinely-inspired, the standard is not significantly "out of touch" with the spoken varieties. Despite the fact that representatives from all states and members of all lineages participated in its codification, however, standard Gán Vẽi does generally favor the dialects of the centrally located and economically influential Kéi, Srǎi, and Ngôi lineages.

Example sentence:
Srǒu cá gán lảng gản nha ma píu cá "Gán-Vẽi" mãu ná vǐ hō lou.
/ʂow˧˨˧ ca˩˧ ɣan˩˧ laŋ˨˩˨ ɣan˨˩˨ ɲa˧ ma˧ piw˩˧ ca˩˧ ɣan˩˧ vej˧˩ maw˧˩ na˩˧ vi˧˨˧ ho˥ low˧/
[ʂɔw˧˨˧ t͡ɕaː˩˧ ɣɑ̃n̪˩˧ ɫ̪ɑ̃ŋ˨˩˨ ɣɑ̃n̪˨˩˨ ɲaː˧ maː˧ pɪw˩˧ t͡ɕaː˩˧ ɣɑ̃n̪˩˧ ʋɛj˧˩ mɑw˧˩ n̪aː˩˧ ʋiː˧˨˧ ɦoː˥ ɫ̪ɔw˧]
srǒu cá gán lảng gản nha ma píu cá Gán Vẽi mãu ná vǐ=hō=lou
speak with throat house INDEF.POSS soft CMPR from with throat common at 1s seem=DIR=real
Speaking with your own accent is a lot better than speaking "properly", I feel.

Thedish (Entry 29):

Dudish /ˈdyːdɪʃ/ (plural Dudishes /ˈdyːdɪʃəs/)
Noun:
1. the name of the language; Dudish, "Thedish", "Theodish", etc.
2. (archaic) any Germanic language
3. (archaic) any West Germanic language
4. (archaic) spoken language, vernacular language, native language
Dudish /ˈdyːdɪʃ/
Adjective:
1. of or pertaining to the Dudish/"Thedish" language
2. of or pertaining to speakers of the Dudish/"Thedish" language
3. (archaic) of or pertaining to Germanic languages or their speakers
4. (archaic) of or pertaining to West Germanic languages or their speakers
5. (archaic) spoken, vernacular, native (of a language)
6. (archaic) popular, common, public
7. (archaic) ethnic, tribal, national, native
8. (archaic) customary, traditional, cultural, ancestral
9. (archaic, religion) gentile
10. (archaic, religion) pagan, heathen
11. (rare) human; of or pertaining to human beings

Alternative forms
dudish, Dydish, dydish, Duidish, duidish, Deutch, deutch, Ditch, ditch, Dutch, dutch
Etymology
From Old Thedish þīedisċ, from Proto-Germanic *þiudiskaz. Compare Dutch Diets, German Deutsch, Icelandic þýskur, Swedish tysk.

Note that the expected reflex of OTh. þīedisċ would be Dydish /ˈdʌɪ̯dɪʃ/, rather than Dudish /ˈdyːdɪʃ/ - seemingly from *þēodisċ instead. It has been suggested that the unexpected vowel may be a result of interdialectal borrowing or analogy with Dude /ˈdyːd/ "person, Thedish-speaker". Whatever the case may be, the result is the same, although forms like Dydish or Duidish - from a hypothetical OTh. *þīodisċ - can be found in other varieties of the language, albeit sometimes with different meanings.
Usage notes
Senses 1-3 of the noun are typically uncountable, but the plural Dudishes may occasionally be encountered in reference to multiple language varieties, especially in older texts which lump all (West) Germanic languages together, most often in contrast with Latin or the Romance languages in general - called Leadish /ˈlɛːdɪʃ/, Leadenish /ˈlɛːdənɪʃ/, or Romance /rɔˈmans/ - and the Celtic languages - Wealish /ˈwɛːlɪʃ/. The coordinate term for Old Norse and its descendants, if treated separately from West Germanic, was typically Deanish /ˈdɛːnɪʃ/. Deanish, Wealish (or Welsh), and Romance survive in the modern language as the words for "Danish", "Welsh", and "Romance", but Leadenish has mostly been displaced by Latyn /laˈtʌɪ̯n/ as the word for "Latin".

The fact that Leadenish, Wealish, and Deanish all contain /ɛː/ is a coincidence. Nevertheless, at one point in history, speakers seem to have come to associate /ɛː/ with the names of foreign peoples and their languages. For example, in some of the earliest Dudish/Thedish texts mentioning Slavic-speaking groups, the expected Winedish /ˈwiːnədɪʃ/ can occasionally be found "misspelled" as Weanedish /ˈwɛːnədɪʃ/. Modern speakers, however, are almost guaranteed to use something along the lines of Slavonish /slaˈvoːnɪʃ/ or Slavic /ˈslaːvɪk/ instead.

Monosyllabic variants of Dudish - namely Deutch /ˈdœt͡ʃ/, Ditch /ˈdɪt͡ʃ/, and Dutch /ˈdʊt͡ʃ/ - may occasionally be used as the names of specific West Germanic languages other than Dudish/Thedish - usually "(High) German", "Low German", and "Dutch", respectively. However, this has declined in recent decades.

Sense 4 of the noun and Senses 5-11 of the adjective are typically not capitalized in writing. In contrast to Senses 1-3 of the noun and Senses 1-4 of the adjective, Sense 4 of the noun and Senses 5-8 of the adjective are - or at least were, when they were still common - frequently used in reference to both Germanic and non-Germanic groups. Senses 9-10 of the adjective are most often associated with early translations of the Bible. As Christianization progressed, dudish as a religious descriptor switched from being something speakers called themselves to something they called others before eventually falling out of use in favor of later loanwords.

prat /ˈprat/ (plural prats /ˈprats/)
Noun:
1. (informal) Dudish, "Thedish", "Theodish", etc.
2. dialect, regiolect; the language variety characteristic of a particular region, area, place, etc.
3. any language variety
4. (derogatory, dated) patois
5. (rare) cant, jargon, vernacular, code
6. (archaic) joke, riddle, trick, lie

Alternative forms
pret, prattes (pl.), plat, pat
Etymology
From Old Thedish pratt, from Proto-Germanic *prattuz. Compare English prat, Dutch prat, Icelandic prettur. Also related to English prate and prattle. The variants plat and pat are thought to have been influenced by German Platt or Low German Plattdütsch and French patois, respectively.
Usage notes
For much of its history, native speakers and outsiders alike have often attempted to characterize Dudish/Thedish as bloot ne prat "just a dialect" of one of its more prestigious relatives - typically English, but occasionally Dutch - due to its perennial lack of the proverbial "army and navy" required to insist otherwise. Even as recently as the mid-1900s, prat was used almost exclusively as a derogatory term. However, as speakers' attitudes towards the language have greatly improved over the past 50-70 years, prat has become more of a neutral word for "language (variety)", used without shame or contempt. However, it is still primarily used in reference to non-standard and low-prestige varieties, although a language like English, for example, might be called a prat sarcastically or as a joke. The term is now also used as a colloquial name for Dudish/Thedish itself, typically as de prat "the dialect" or uir prat "our dialect".

Example sentence:
De Allwyd Retching ef Dudish Ryts, swea in de prat dyded, forcloars det…
/də ˈalˌwʌɪ̯d ˈrɛt͡ʃɪŋ ɛf ˈdyːdɪʃ ˈrʌɪ̯ts | swɛː ɪn də ˈprat ˈdʌɪ̯dəd | fɔrˈklɔːrs dɛt/
[d‿ˈɑɫwed ˈɾɛt͡ʃɨ̃ŋ‿əv ˈdyːdɨʃ ˈɾʌɪ̯t̚s | swɛ̃‿n‿nə ˈpɾat̚ ˈdʌɪ̯dəd̥ | fəɾˈklɔːɾz dət̚]
de Allwyd Retch-ing ef Dudish Ryt-s, swea in de prat dyd-ed, forcloar-s det
DEF universal explain-GER of popular right-PL, so in DEF dialect translate-PST.PTCP, state-PRES that
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as translated into Dudish/Thedish, states that…

Back in 2017, I think, I mentioned this sort of joke-idea I'd had for an a posteriori Germanic language where the reflex of Proto-Germanic *þeudō, which would be the speakers' name for themselves and/or just the word for "person", was dude [ˈdyːd~ˈdʉːd]. I've tried looking for the original post using the board's search function, but nothing's turned up, so I figure it must have been part of a thread that got deleted to help free up space. Anyway "Thedish", which I started working on for Lexember 2019, is what's come of that idea being taken at least 50~75% seriously. I think of it as "Dudish" in my head, and that's what it's called in all my notes, but for whatever reason, I guess I wasn't in the mood to potentially have to explain the name back at the start of the month. Anyway, as a result of the sound changes I wanted to have happen to get dude from *þeudō, I ended up deciding to make it a pretty normal/average/boring West Germanic language. I don't want/need/expect it to be interesting to anyone other than myself, but I enjoy working with it because I, for whatever reason, find small deviations from "the familiar" (in my case, English) fun, and because it lets me play around with things like the lexicon, for instance, without having to create all the roots from scratch or having to worry about whether or not I'm fundamentally misunderstanding any of the morphosyntactic features I want to implement. That's why I like using it for Lexember. It's also been a fun excuse to learn a lot about the history of my own native language and its closest relatives. Dudish/Thedish/Theodish/whatever has changed a lot in the past year, and it's definitely still a constant work-in-progress - I've made changes to the vowels at least three times this month - but thankfully I'm still enjoying working with it.

The a priori language I used for Lexember the past two years, called Y²KS for lack of a better name, has by no means been abandoned. However, I just haven't been happy with it for a while, and felt the need to start from scratch and rethink my approach, so to speak. I hadn't made much progress by the end of November, so I decided to take a break from that project and use a different a priori idea for this year's Lexember instead. Gán Vẽi is the result of an idea I had back in September, I believe. I originally called it Yòu Kéi /jow˥˧ kej˩˧/ after the first two meaningless words I came up with to exemplify the aesthetic I was going for. However, based on the English word "you", it occurred to me that the name might be read as sounding like "UK", and again, as silly as this sounds, I guess I wasn't in the mood on December 1st to potentially have to explain myself, so I came up with "Gán Vẽi" as a substitute, decided it meant something like "Common Language", and ended up waiting until now to actually decide on the etymologies of the two components. I originally had the idea to make the word for "language" in some conlang related to "throat" instead of "tongue" after reading about this. I've probably done it elsewhere before, but that concept's shown up again here. Yòu Kéi has ended up as the name of one of the "lineages" mentioned above, although I haven't really worked out what exactly the first word means yet. As I believe I may have mentioned briefly earlier in the month, I'm not happy with how the language has turned out aesthetically, but I'm glad I've gotten to work with it like this to get a better idea of what I do and don't like about the current version.
Khemehekis
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

Iyionaku wrote: 29 Dec 2020 12:05
Khemehekis wrote: 28 Dec 2020 22:35
I know what stollen and lebkuchen are, but I've never heard of langos. Is that a Hungarian food?

EDIT: Any word for "pfeffernuss"?
Yep! It's a a deep fried flatbread with sour cream, cheese and garlic (and other variants) that for some reason surfaced on every Christmas Market in my region.
I think I'd like to try some langos!
And no, I don't have a word for pfeffernuss, as it's not common at all where I'm from. But now, that I'm at it, I will add it to my lexicon as iʻensokól, which is simply a loan translation from "pepper" and "nut".
Yay!
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 67,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
Iyionaku
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Lexember 30th - Yélian

meyeia [məˈʃeːɪ̯ɐ] - to fast (abstain from food voluntarily)
Etymology: meyé "sacrifice" + verbalizer -ia

USAGE NOTE: if you want to emphasize what you're abstaining from (if it's not everything), you need to use the preposition can "for"

muyasina [ˌmuːʃɐˈsiːnɐ] - fasting period (like Lent in Christianity)
Etymology: muya "to eat" + sina "air"

Fum muyasina canarmeyeai can muyasólan, álcol è garesif.
[ɸʉm ˌmuːʃɐˈsiːnɐ ˌkaːnɐɾməˈʃeː.aɪ̯ kɐn ˌmuːʃɐˈsoːlɐn, ˈalkɔ̈l ɛ gɐˈɾeːsɨ]
during fasting_period usually-fast-1SG for candy-PL, alcohol and coffee
During the fasting period I normally pass on sweet candy, alcohol and coffee.

Bonus word: esp:

lenguaje [leŋˈgwaːxe] - language (as in programming language, jargon etc.)
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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KaiTheHomoSapien
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien »

qwed117 wrote: 27 Dec 2020 21:34 I really have loved seeing Arculese and Lihmelinyan over the last four weeks. It's a really interesting language. As I've mentioned before the aesthetics remind me of other languages, but yet it still manages to make its own flavour, like in dáikīr and siókei.
Creating a language with its own "flavor" is something I struggle with so I'm glad to hear you say that [:D]

25th

keírūmi - I believe, trust

A common verb of religious ritual, it also simply means "trust" and is used to refer to both religious belief but also trust in a friend.

26th

tētuom - neut. - story, fable, folktale, myth

Can mean all of the above depending on the context. Mantians highly regard the myths written down in the three sacred texts but there are many stories that build on these and are not "canon" but have wide circulation and popularity.

27th

borégom - neut. - journey, quest

The word simply means "journey, trip" but has come to refer to a specific solitary rite of passage related to wandering. Its origins are archaic and may be derived from tribal coming of age rituals; in modern Manter it's become a spiritual journey of meditation undertaken by adolescents, particularly those going into religious orders.

28th

sármenos - masc. - master of ceremonies

Derived from a verb meaning "to officiate, to watch over". The sármenos is responsible for maintaining religious protocol and ritual and oversees religious ceremonies.

29th

vánitīr - fem. - holiday, festival, celebration
vaniāmi - I celebrate, rejoice

The noun is derived from the verb. Refers to any religious or secular festival. Mantians have many, including one each month dedicated to each of the 12 principal deities.

30th

ókanth - masc. - calendar, clock, measure

ókanth comes from a root meaning "to measure" but has come to mean both calendar and "clock". Mechanical clocks as we understand them have not yet been invented in Manter, but sundials, water clocks, and other means of measuring duration of time do exist and this word can describe them. I based the Mantian calendar on the French Revolutionary calendar (because why not).
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 30

Gán Vẽi (Entry 30):

Yòu Gỏm /jow˥˧ ɣom˨˩˨/ (animate)
(Proper) Noun:
1. the Gỏm lineage; one of eight ethnic subgroups
2. (collective) members of the Gỏm lineage
3. an individual member of the Gỏm lineage
4. the general area traditionally inhabited by members of the Gỏm lineage
5. the accent or dialect of the Gỏm lineage
6. the traditions and customs of the Gỏm lineage

Alternative forms
Yòu Gỏ
Etymology
From yòu "(social) circle, lineage, tribe, clan, faction" + gỏm "pink, magenta, fuchsia, rose, flower, blossom".
yòu is from Old TBD s·jôôʔ "institution, band, team, family", from Proto-TBD *sɔɔ "with, together, whole" + *ɟooʔ "to build, to construct, to establish".
gỏm is from Old TBD nhu·gôm "flower, springtime", from Proto-TBD *ɲel "fruit, sprout, bud" + *xo "face, appearance" + *mɯɯ "sun, light; bright, shining".

gỏm "pink, rose, flower, blossom" is homophonous with the verbal proclitic used to show agreement with a third-person singular subject in the habitual aspect. The proclitic is from Old TBD gôôm "3s.HAB", from Proto-TBD *ɣoo "third-person singular pronoun" + *maa "to stay, to stand, to remain". This rarely, if ever, causes any confusion.

In Yòu Gỏ, gỏ "glow, radiance, shine" is from Old TBD m·gô "sunlight, glare", from Proto-TBD *mɯɯ "sun, light; bright, shining" + *xo "face, appearance". This is a fairly rare variant of the lineage's name which may have originated due to the dialectal pronunciation of gỏm [ɣõː˨˩˨] being confused with the standard pronunciation of gỏ [ɣoː˨˩˨].
Usage notes
The Yòu Gỏm are the smallest of the eight Gán Vẽi-speaking "lineages", both in terms of population and the size of their traditional territory. Among the other lineages, they are known primarily as skilled horticulturalists, most notable for their festivals featuring colorful flower arrangements and ornate topiaries. Although the vast majority of individual Gỏm do not dedicate their daily lives to gardening, of course, this is generally how they see themselves, as well. As they are often overshadowed in other areas by larger neighboring groups like the Kéi, Ngôi, and Minh, they take pride in being considered the best at creating plant-based art and refer to themselves as members of the "Floral" or "Flower-Colored" lineage.

Some notable features of the Yòu Gỏm accent or dialect, at least in terms of pronunciation, include the loss of coda nasals with the compensatory lengthening of preceding vowels, as in [ɣõː˨˩˨] for standard gỏm [ɣɔ̃m˨˩˨]; all coda stops merging as [ʔ], as in [sɪʔ˥] and [ʝɛʔ˨˩˨] for standard sīp [sɪp̚˥] "to wander, to roam" and yẻk [ʝɛk̚˨˩˨] "orphan, only child, heir"; the realization of aspirated stops as fricatives, as in [ɸɛj˩˧~fɛj˩˧] and [xoː˨˩˨] for standard phéi [pʰɛj˩˧~p͡ɸɛj˩˧] "door; to enter" and khỏ [kʰoː˨˩˨~k͡xoː˨˩˨] "to see, to observe"; and a low-level tone in place of the standard mid-falling tone, as in [ʈ͡ʂɛj˩] for standard trẽi [ʈ͡ʂɛj˧˩] "rot, mold".

Example sentence:
Rĩu khỏ mãu gỏm trẽi sīp zảm cá, mà rĩu ngàt gỏm lou lou ma Lảng Nhẻu mãu Vóu-Kâi lāng Yòu Gỏm phéi pǎi cá!
/ɻiw˧˩ kʰo˨˩˨ maw˧˩ ɣom˨˩˨ ʈ͡ʂej˧˩ sip˥ t͡sam˨˩˨ ca˩˧ | ma˥˧ ɻiw˧˩ ŋat˥˧ ɣom˨˩˨ low˧ low˧ ma˧ laŋ˨˩˨ ɲew˨˩˨ maw˧˩ vow˩˧ kaj˦˥˧ laŋ˥ jow˥˧ ɣom˨˩˨ pʰej˩˧ paj˧˨˧ ca˩˧/
[ɻɪw˩ xoː˨˩˨ mɑw˩ ɣõː˨˩˨ ʈ͡ʂɛj˨ sɪʔ˦ t͡sɑ̃ː˨˩˨ t͡ɕæː˩˧ | mɑː˥˧ ɻɪw˨ ŋɑʔ˦˧ ɣõː˨˩˨ ɫ̪ɔw˨ ɫ̪ɔw˧ mɑː˧ ɫ̪ɑ̃ː˨˩˨ ɲɛw˨˩˨ mɑw˩ β̞ɔw˩˧ kʲæj˦˥˧ ɫ̪ɑ̃ː˥ jœw˥˧ ɣõː˨˩˨ fɛj˩˧ pæj˧˨˧ t͡ɕæː˩˧]
rĩu khỏ mãu gỏm trẽi sīp zảm=cá, mà rĩu ngàt gỏm lou~lou ma lảng nhẻu mãu Vóu Kâi lāng Yòu Gỏm phéi pǎi=cá
for see at flower rot roam stop=IMP, but for art flower real~INT CMPR house sprout at rain two within circle flower enter come=IMP
Quit wandering around looking for sh***y flowers and come on down to Vou-Kai's Greenhouse in the You Gom region for the best damn flower arrangements in the whole wide world!

Thedish (Entry 30):

cruit /ˈkrœʏ̯t/ (plural cruiden /ˈkrœʏ̯dən/)
Noun:
1. crwth, crowd, rote
2. (dated) fiddle, violin
3. harp, Celtic harp
4. (dated) guitar, lute
5. (rare, dated) any stringed instrument

Alternative forms
croet, cruwt, cruet, cruides (pl.), cruidow (pl.)
Etymology
Borrowed from a Celtic language, ultimately from Proto-Celtic *kruttos "round thing". Compare Welsh crwth, Irish cruit, English crwth.
Usage notes
cruit is most commonly used in reference to stringed instruments associated with folk music, particularly Celtic folk music. In the past, however, it was occasionally used more generally.

sweil /ˈswɛɪ̯l/ (plural sweiles /ˈswɛɪ̯l(ə)s/)
Noun:
1. flute, piccolo, traverse flute
2. flute, recorder, vertical flute
3. pan flute
4. flute; any woodwind instrument without a reed
5. (rare) organ pipe
6. (rare) pipe, tube
7. (informal) anything roughly flute-shaped
sweil /ˈswɛɪ̯l/ (long inf. sweilen /ˈswɛɪ̯l(ə)n/, pst. ptcp. sweiled /ˈswɛɪ̯l(ə)d/, pres. ptcp. sweilend /ˈswɛɪ̯lənd/, ger. sweiling /ˈswɛɪ̯lɪŋ/)
Verb:
1. to play a traverse flute
2. to play a vertical flute
3. to play a pan flute
4. to play any woodwind instrument without a reed
5. (rare) to play an organ
6. (rare) to plumb, to work as a plumber
7. (informal) to whistle

Etymology
From Old Thedish sweġl and sweġloian, from Proto-Germanic *sweglō and *sweglōną.
Usage notes
Although the loanword fluit /ˈflœʏ̯t/ is now commonly used for traverse flutes, particularly the "Western concert flute", sweil remains a fairly common term for similar instruments from folk music traditions all over the world.

Example sentence:
Y does lyt sweilen, dow myn maidow can de cruit en de harp hely best beleke!
/ʌɪ̯ duːs ˈlʌɪ̯t ˈswɛɪ̯lən | dɔʊ̯ mʌɪ̯n ˈmaɪ̯dɔʊ̯ kan də ˈkrœʏ̯t ɛn də ˈharp ˈheːlʌɪ̯ ˈbɛst bɛˈleːk/
[ʔe dʊs ˈlʌɪ̯t̚ ˈswɛɪ̯lə̃n | do mẽ‿ˈmaɪ̯do kə̃n‿nə ˈkɾ̥œʏ̯t‿ə̃n‿nə ˈhaɾp ˈheːle ˈbɛst̚ bəˈleːk]
y doe-s lyt sweil-en, dow myn maidow can-Ø de cruit en de harp hely best beleke-Ø
1s.NOM do.PRES-PRES lightly flute-L.INF, but 1s.GEN girlfriend can-PRES DEF crwth and DEF harp very well play-S.INF
I'm alright at playing the flute, but my girlfriend can play the crwth and the harp very well!

I realized that, in yesterday's post, I had mistakenly written that there are 7 Gán Vẽi-speaking subgroups, but my original idea was that there would be 8. To rectify this, and because I'd already been planning to deal with the word for "lineage" today, I decided to make today's entry the name of the eighth and smallest (and often overlooked [:P] ) group.
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Jackk
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

30m Decembr
in translation from the censor’s guide for the Dijon New School 2019 Concurrence History scitation paper La Famil, Costume et Langue : Les Muèsons de Culture aus Années Grand-Jeus (Family, Tradition and Language: the Changing Culture of the Good Game Decades), lectured jointly by Professor Marc Jeichi and Doctor Vanne Romaçue, the former in peripatetico from the University in Cordin.
Question 1: How did Britain [a polity comprising most of the British Isles bar IRL England] retain its position of cultural prestige over British Mendeva during the final years of the nineteenth century even as the latter overtook Britain in population and industry, and to what extent were the ethics of the Household Renovation exported to the Novamund via this cachet?

- for the first, look for talk of increased transmigration of the new rich across the Atlantic and rates of intermarriage thereamongst.
- further, reward mention of the boom of the Vetomundine masquira genre and how it displaced the autochthonous herdtale tradition (spefically look for reference to Cosωteg’s Hasiny diaries).
- for the second, only give credit to responses highlighting the ongoing debate as to the timeline of Laic adoption in Gulf Mendeva; at least two disagreeing authors must be mentioned.

Question 2: Discuss the rise of the New Urban Mesh and their subsumption into the Collusion, with emphasis on the growth of London following the Global Workshop period. In particular, compare the popular account of their use of espionage in the East to steer politics in tradewise-beneficial directions with the likely reality.

- give credit for emphasising the role of maritime technology and especially access to coal in supporting the Urban trade.
- look for responses which prove that the student has done more than watch 1968 film “Mr Desarden, Prince Consort”; that they are actually familiar with James Desarden’s career in the City Administration both before his assignment to Nackon Dai and after the scandal of 1887.
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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Dormouse559
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

I fell off the wagon there for a bit. Well, have eight nine days' worth of words!

22 lexembre - Iluhsa
arši [ˈarʃi] n - moon (< *arkʷe)

Kuruivónta hindaþina aršai landi.
[kuru̯iˈvonta hinˈdaθina ˈarʃai̯ ˈlandi]
kóru-évónta hindaþin-a arš<a>i landi
shine_on-IPV.3S milk_white-ERG moon<ERG> house

The milk-white moon shone on the house.

Funnily enough, I came up with the modern form, arši, first, but it ended up being the etymon that captured my heart. It's so beautiful [:3]

23 lexembre
vèiti [ˈvɛi̯ti] n - night (< *vaite)

Vèitaši zimaġmaklinur?
[ˈvɛi̯taʃi zimaŋmakˈlinur]
vèit<ak>i zé-mak~mak-linu-r
night<LOC> INT-PRS~read-something-2S.NOM

Do you read at night?


24 lexembre
malis [ˈmalis] v - rule, reign; dominate (< *maləs "rule")
malsin [ˈmalsin] n - rule, reign, dominion (irregular PL: malsézza; < malis + -én, "result")
malsúhan [malˈsuhan] n - ruler, lord (< malis + -(u)han, agentive)

Landašin malsivónta mavòžžimi.
[lanˈdaʃin malsiˈvonta maˈvɔʒʒimi]
land<ak>i-én malis-évónta mav<òžž-im>i
house<LOC>-DEM rule-IPV cat.ABS<1P-GEN>

Our cat rules this house.


EDIT: forgot the 25th

25 lexembre
néli - lamp (< *nele)
niliksi - star (< néli + -ksi, diminutive)

Déi niliksavi kanabaþkuaši taġvivituk.
[ˈdei̯ niˈliksavi kanaˈbaθku̯aʃi taŋviˈvituk]
déi niliks<av>i kana-baþku<ak>i taġu-évit-k
NEG star<DAT> rain-cloud<LOC> see-PST-1S.NOM

I could see no stars among the rain clouds.


26 lexembre
veinmalsin [vei̯nˈmalsin] n - lunar station (< vèiti + malsin)

Veinmalsénoġ kallónvora taġuhalvékru.
[vei̯nmalˈsenoŋ kalˈloɱvora taŋuhalˈvekru]
veinmalsin-òġ kallunu-o-za taġu-halu-éu-k=ru
lunar_station-GEN twenty_eight-DAT-PRED see-CAUS-FUT-1S.NOM=2S.ACC

I will show you the twenty-eight lunar stations.


27 lexembre
kéz [ˈkez] v - ferment (middle voice) (< *kez "bubble, boil")
kézdio [ˈkezdi̯o] v - ferment, cause to (< kéz + -tiòu, causative)
kéznara [ˈkeznara] n/adj - fermentation (< kéz + -nara, deverbal)

Miaivuntaummi kirivitenia uržidama tavani.
[mi̯ai̯vunˈtau̯mmi kiriˈviteni̯a urˈʒidama ˈtavani]
méa-évónta-òummi kéz-évit-bèni-a uržidam-a tavani
please-IPV-3P.NOM ferment-PST-REL-ERG drink-ERG father.ABS

My father likes fermented drinks.

Get it? "Ferment"? Because the theme is "culture"? [xP]


28 lexembre
kizdiahindin [kizdi̯aˈhindin] n - yogurt (< kizdiahindi [object incorp. < kézdio + hindi "milk"] + -én, "result"; lit. "result of fermenting milk")


29 lexembre
daur [ˈdau̯r] n - honey (< dafər)

Buburumtiskixa kizdiahindin daurus.
[buburumˈtiskixa kizdi̯aˈhindin ˈdau̯rus]
bó~bórum-tiské-xa kizdiahindin daur=hus
PRS~eat-normally-PAS.3S yogurt.ABS honey.ABS=with

Yogurt is normally eaten with honey.


30 lexembre
èiksa [ˈɛi̯ksa] n/adj - time (in general); period of time, duration, era; temporal (< *aiksa)

eikubura
[eiˈkubura]
èik-ubó-sa
time-good-PRED

the good times


qwed117 wrote: 27 Dec 2020 21:34I think this use of numerals is really cool! That's a part of languages that I usually ignore far too much. I think it's interesting that the numerals are more noun like and take the genitive of the noun. I also find the mixed base-14/base-28 numeral system to be interesting, similar to French.
That's where the idea comes from [:)] Glad you like it. It's also efficient because it halves the number of base multiples you need words for [:P] (seven instead of fourteen in this case)
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qwed117
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 30th
hwai2 /ẘai˥/ prep before, preceding, behind [in order]
ja1-than3 /ɕa˧tʰan˧˩/ adj old, rank, stale
khǒ1 /kʰɔː˧/ n firework
jë3-mai1 /ɕɤ˧˩mai˧/ n ball

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
teh₁- v 'to create, to make, to build, to develop'

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
ɓawɦ˨˩ n 'year' from Proto- Hlai *hmuːɦ 'year', cf. Cunhua ɓaː5, Ha Em, Tongzha Nadouhua,, all Meifu, all Run/Bendi paw2, Jiamao maː1

Sardinian
inghitzare v 'to begin' from a conflation of Italian iniziare 'to initiate' and Sardinian ghetare 'to cast, to go down', from Classical Latin INITIO and IACTO

su soli inghitzat a indorai is trigus
the sun begins to gild the wheat

apu inghitzau a solu cantendu sa stória nosta
I have begun only singing our story

immoi inghitzat sa cumunioni
now begins the communion

eus inghitzau su sartitzu nou
we have begun our sausages
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 31

Gán Vẽi (Entry 31):

Tùi Vāc Khẻ /tuj˥˧ vac˥ kʰe˨˩˨/ (inanimate or animate)
(Proper) Noun:
1. the first few days of the year
2. the traditional New Year's festival
3. the main event at the traditional New Year's festival

Etymology
From tùi "festival, party, feast, holiday" + vāc "boat, ship" + khẻ "moon, crescent moon, crescent, sickle".
tùi is from Old TBD thuuiʔ "holiday, feast day", from Proto-TBD *thuu "happy, joyful; to celebrate" + *rɔɔʔ "sacrifice, ritual, ceremony, habit".
vāc is from Old TBD hl·ueec "boat, ship", from Proto-TBD *hlis "to rise" + *wɛɛ "to flow, to swim" + *cee "wood, tree".
khẻ is from Old TBD glê "crescent moon", from Proto-TBD *gɯ "to cut, to carve" + *hle "moon, star".
Usage notes
Tùi Vāc Khẻ celebrates the start of a new year and the end of the monsoon season, a period of several months during which flash floods and certain diseases become more common, but which is also very important for agriculture. Once rain is no longer constantly on the forecast for the foreseeable future, people resume traveling along the rivers by boat, transporting recently-harvested crops grown during the rainy season. In the past, it was not uncommon for families or entire villages to relocate to higher ground during the monsoon season, but this practice has declined over time as the population has increased and architectural techniques, for lack of a better term, have improved. Nevertheless, Tùi Vāc Khẻ remains a time for transporting produce and visiting friends and family in other towns. The festival lasts several days, with the main event - a parade of ornately decorated river boats - taking place on the final day. Different regions have their own unique traditions surrounding this festival, of course, but the boat parade is fairly universal.

The intended meaning behind the name Tùi Vāc Khẻ, roughly the "Crescent Moon Boat Festival", apparently seems to be somewhat open to interpretation, due mostly to the different senses of khẻ "moon, crescent moon, crescent, sickle". Some interpret it as the "Moon Boat Festival", since it is a festival involving boats which occurs at the beginning of the calendar year, and celestial bodies like the moon are relevant to the calendar. Others interpret it as the "Sickle Boat Festival", since it is, in part, a harvest festival involving boats, and although the kinds of crops a sickle would typically be used to harvest are mostly grown at a different time of year, the sickle is still associated with harvesting in general. Still others interpret it as the "Crescent Boat Festival", with khẻ describing the general shape of the boats associated with the occasion. Ultimately, it's likely that all of these interpretations are - at least partially - correct. As with many culturally important nouns, the name of the holiday may occasionally be treated as animate thanks to the use of poetic license.

Tô Bủ Diu /to˦˥˧ ɓu˨˩˨ ɗiw˧/ (inanimate or animate)
(Proper) Noun:
1. the entire known world
2. the area inhabited by Gán Vẽi speakers
3. (collective) the people of the world
4. (collective) the various ways in which people speak and behave
5. (figurative) social norms, cultural practices

Etymology
From "realm, (known) world" + bủ "color, flavor, type, variant, thing" + diu "great, vast, mighty".
is from Old TBD tôʔ "land, country, kingdom, domain", from Proto-TBD *to "wide, broad" + *hɤʔ "meadow, field, valley".
bủ is from Old TBD bu "topic, idea, plan, potential, possibility", from Proto-TBD *bu "problem, issue, matter, conflict, danger".
diu is from Old TBD diiuʔ "very many, infinite", from Proto-TBD *dii "to count, to explain, to remember" + *look "large, great".
Usage notes
Senses 1 and 2 are often inanimate, but Senses 3-5 are typically animate.

The land inhabited by the speakers of Gán Vẽi is bordered by an ocean to the north and mountains to the east, west, and south. The southern mountains are the source of a large river that flows downhill all the way north to the sea. It is along this river and its many tributaries that the majority of Gán Vẽi speakers live. Although the mountains to the east and west are generally not nearly as tall and difficult to traverse as those to the south, for Gán Vẽi speakers, this river basin is essentially the extent of the world as they know it, which they call Tô Bủ Diu - roughly "the Vast Realm of Many Different Things". The speakers of Gán Vẽi are not the only people who inhabit this "world", although they likely make up at least half of its total population and culturally dominate the northern coast and much of the neighboring lowlands.

Example sentence:
Tùi Vāc Khẻ mõi mãu tùi ngàt ngàt ma lāng Tô Bủ Diu vǐ gá!
/tuj˥˧ vac˥ kʰe˨˩˨ moj˧˩ maw˧˩ tuj˥˧ ŋat˥˧ ŋat˥˧ ma˧ laŋ˥ to˦˥˧ ɓu˨˩˨ ɗiw˧ vi˧˨˧ ɣa˩˧/
[t̪ʏj˥˧ ʋæɪ̯c̚˦ k͡xʲeː˧˩˨ mœj˧˩ mɑw˧˨ t̪ʏj˦˧ ŋat̪̚˦ ŋat̪̚˥˧ maː˧ ɫ̪ɑ̃ŋ˥ t̪oː˦˥˧ ɓuː˨˩˨ ɗ̪ɪw˧ ʋiː˧˨˧ ɣaː˩˧]
Tùi Vāc Khẻ mõi mãu tùi ngàt~ngàt ma lāng Tô Bủ Diu vǐ=gá
festival boat crescent_moon one at festival love~INT CMPR within world colorful great seem=INFER
The Crescent Moon Boat Festival seems to be one of the most popular holidays in the world!

Thedish (Entry 31):

Calendean /ˈkaːləndˌɛːn/ (plural Calendeans /ˈkaːləndˌɛːns/)
(Proper) Noun:
1. New Year's Eve, December 31st on the Gregorian calendar
2. New Year's Eve according to a different calendar and/or for a different culture
3. a New Year's Eve party

Alternative forms
Calenean, Calend Eaven, Calen Eaven, Calend Eavend, Calen Eavend
Etymology
From calend "calends, first day of the month" + -ean "eve, evening".

calends, now mostly archaic outside of the names of certain holidays, is ultimately from Latin kalendae, possibly via a Celtic language or Old English calend. Compare Welsh calan, Scottish Gaelic Callain. ean is a variant of eaven "evening" used mostly in the names of holidays. eaven is from Old Thedish ǣfan or ǣfand, from Proto-Germanic *ēbanþs. Compare English eve.
Usage notes
Sense 3 is inherently countable, but Senses 1 and 2 may be as well when discussing the same date but in different years.

Other names for New Year's Eve include Niwyear Eaven /ˈnyːˌjɛːr ˈɛːvən/, Aldyear (Eaven) /ˈaldˌjɛːr (ˈɛːvən)/, (Sant) Silvester /(ˈsant) sɪlˈvɛstər/, Wetchnaut /ˈwɛt͡ʃˌnaʊ̯t/, Wakenaut /ˈwaːkˌnaʊ̯t/, Noscalen /nɔsˈkaːlən/, and Noskel /ˈnɔskəl/. Common names for New Year's Day include Niwyear (Day) /ˈnyːˌjɛːr (ˈdaɪ̯)/, (Fermest) Yearday /(ˈfɛrməst) ˈjɛːrˌdaɪ̯/, and Calenday /ˈkaːlənˌdaɪ̯/.

maidow /ˈmaɪ̯dɔʊ̯/ (plural maidows /ˈmaɪ̯dɔʊ̯s/)
Noun:
1. girlfriend; a woman with whom one is romantically involved but to whom one is not (yet) married
2. (dated) fiancée; a woman with whom one is romantically involved and to whom one is engaged to be married
3. (informal) wife; a woman to whom one is married
4. (informal) a woman assumed to be romantically involved with someone
5. (informal, humorous) something with which a (typically single) person is preoccupied, such as work or a hobby

Alternative forms
maitow, meidow (pl.), meidows (pl.), meitow (pl.), meitows (pl.)
Etymology
From mait "(unmarried) young woman" + -ow "diminutive suffix".

mait, now generally archaic on its own, is from Old Thedish mæġeþ, from Proto-Germanic *magaþs.

-ow is a variant of -ock, from Old Thedish -oc, from Proto-Germanic *-ukaz. There seems to be, or have been, some kind of dissimilatory process at work involving this suffix, as the variant -ow frequently occurs suffixed to roots ending in stop consonants, as seen here, while the variant -ock frequently occurs elsewhere, as in oyock "islet, holm, eyot". This is not an absolute rule, however.
Usage notes
The similarity in sound between maidow "girlfriend" and meadow /ˈmɛːdɔʊ̯/ or meddow /ˈmɛdɔʊ̯/ "meadow" has been taken advantage of so frequently in poetry and other forms of media that "meadow" has become a common slang term for "girlfriend".

Example sentence:
Fermest hes y myn maidow an Calendean mited. Is det neut hely romantish?
/ˈfɛrməst hɛs ʌɪ̯ mʌɪ̯n ˈmaɪ̯dɔʊ̯ an ˈkaːləndˌɛːn ˈmiːtəd || ɪs dɛt nœt ˈheːlʌɪ̯ rɔˈmantɪʃ/
[ˈfɛɾməst̚ həs‿e mẽ‿ˈmaɪ̯do ʔə̃ŋ ˈkʰaːlə̃nˌnɛ̃ːn ˈmiːtəd̥ || ʔɨz dət̚ nət̚ ˈheːle ɾəˈmɑ̃ntɨʃ]
fermest he-s y myn maidow an Calendean mite-d || is-Ø det neut hely romantish
first have.PRES-PRES 1s.NOM 1s.GEN girlfriend on New_Year's_Eve meet-PST.PTCP || be.PRES-PRES that NEG very romantic
I first met my girlfriend on New Year's Eve. Isn't that so romantic?

I realized recently that I'd gone almost the entire month without creating any words for Gán Vẽi beginning with /t/, either for main Lexember entries or for example sentences. All other initial consonant phonemes were represented, both in main entries and in the examples, and there were words with coda /t/, but somehow there weren't any with /t/ in the onset of the syllable. I also realized that none of the words I'd used for main entries had the rimes /Vc u e o iw uj/ or the high-level tone. I decided to rectify all of these gross injustices today with two three-word items.

At the beginning of the month, it occurred to me that I had no idea what to call the language family to which Gán Vẽi belongs, so I labeled its ancestors as "Old TBD" and "Proto-TBD", thinking I'd come up with something soon enough. I didn't. Now at the very end of the month, however, given what I'd set out to do today, I decided to change that as well. So, "TBD" now stands for the geographical region of Tô Bủ Diu rather than "To Be Determined".

Many thanks to everyone who's participated in Lexember 2020! I've enjoyed seeing what all of you have been working on, and I hope it's been at least an OK experience! I love doing Lexember, but I know that I'm still personally more than ready for it to be over by the end of the month! In any case, within the next week or so, I'm planning to go back and read through what everyone's posted so I can finally take the time to comment on it. [:)]
Iyionaku
mayan
mayan
Posts: 1779
Joined: 25 May 2014 14:17

Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Alas, the last word for the year!

Lexember 31st - Yélian

vendecam [vənˈdeːkɐm] - toast
Etymology: venda "to fry, roast" + tecam "bread"

Additional new words for the example sentence:
Spoiler:
ʻéniela [ˈʔeːnɪ̯əlɐ] - paprika (green or yellow), paprika powder
Etymology: cross-derived from iʻeni "pepper" + ela "plant"; note that red paprika is considered pepper in Yélian culture

yampiýn [ʃɐmˈpa̯iːn] - sparkling wine, champaigne
Etymology: from French champagne
U brandan muyest vendecam fecun nevos, vænetnakibulats è ʻéniela èpa siest yampiýn.
[u ˈbrandɐn ˈmuːʃəst vənˈdeːkɐm ˈɸeːkʉn ˈneːʋɔ̈ʃ, ˈvœnətnakɨˌbuːlɐt͡s ɛ ˈʔeːnɪ̯əla ˈɛpɐ ˈsiː.əst ʃɐmˈpa̯iːn]
TEMP new_year eat-1PLEX toast with pineapple, cheese-melt-ADZ and paprika and drink-1PLEX sparkling_wine
At New Year's Eve, we eat toasted bread with pineapple, molten cheese and paprika and drink sparkling wine.

Bonus word :esp:

nochevieja [not͡ʃeˈbjexa] - New Year's eve
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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qwed117
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 3894
Joined: 20 Nov 2014 02:27

Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember New Year's Eve

hya2-jű1 /j̊a˥ɕɯː˧/ intj goodbye [formal]
mëi2-yo3 /mɤi˧yo˧˩/ n past
zaw3-hay4 /t͡saw˧˩xay˩˥/ intj welcome, greetings [formal]
ba3-jö1 /ba˧˩ɕə˧/ adj new
òi2 /ɔi˥/ n year

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
m̥ih₂s-u n 'year'

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
panʔ˦˨ adv 'last year' from Proto- Hlai *pənʔ 'last year', cf. Cunhua, Nadouhua, Ha Em, Tongzha, Zandui, Baoting, Yuanmen pʰan3, Bouhin pʰen3, all Meifu, Baishapʰaŋ3*

I think this is all supposed to be aspirated, and Norquest made a mistake in writing it as *p rather than *pʰ

Sardinian
ocannu adv 'this year' from Latin HOC + ANNUS

Mi aia fatu contu chi ocannu mi devia cogiuare
He/she/they had told me that I must marry this year

Già l'ischis ca ocanno est annada mala: at piópidu pagu!
Already you can tell why this year is a bad year: it's rained little!

Est ora de tocare su vinu de ocannu!
It's the hour to begin drinking* this year's wine

Ocannu, genti meda bandat a sa festa?
This year, are many folk leaving to the celebration?

Ocannu no est pruendi!
This year, it is not raining!

*tocare su vinu literally means "touch the wine", but is used to mean "begin drinking"


Goodbye 2020, Welcome 2021. Good luck and Godspeed.
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

The SqwedgePad
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Jackk
roman
roman
Posts: 1340
Joined: 04 Aug 2012 13:08
Location: Damborn, Istr Boral

Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

Last entry! [:D]
31r Decembr
rasgatto /ˌras.gaˈto/ [ˌʀaz.gɐˈto] conclusion, resolution, dénouement

also the end of a tale, the reveal of a mystery, the calming down of a storm or argument

also period between the official end of an event and the time everyone has left and everything has been packed away
< borrowed 19C during the Good Game period from Venise Italian rasgatto “resolution, unravelling of a mystery or story”, used at first in the literary circles of the region. This comes from Zahid Russian разгадто “unknotting, solving”, and specifically from Boxa author Olexi Harchenko’s mystery romance of the same name. The word had spread to different spheres by the 1910s, and to the “end of an event” by 1941—specifically referring to the pitch crowds that formed after professional lineball matches.

Nos attenm y rasgatto dell'an ant untal avidtað.
We await the year’s end with such eagerness.
/no‿zaˈtenm̩ i ˌras.gaˈto deˈlan ant ɪnˈtal ˌa.vɪdˈtaθ/
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu n'un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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Shemtov
runic
runic
Posts: 3086
Joined: 29 Apr 2013 04:06

Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Shemtov »

Day 27:
Maillys: "Táunyŕŕ" "Year"

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Tʿāoniṭl "Solar Year, used for farming and the crop tax"

Day 28:
Maillys: "Ásus" "A six-month period used in some city states for political functions"

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Ātzōṭẓʿ "Lunisolar Year, used for ritual purposes"

Day 29:
Maillys: "Gáś " "Month"

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Cāiẓ "Lunar month"

Day 30:
Maillys: "Śécuć" "Period of time"

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Xicōichi "Solar month"

Day 31:
Maillys: "Pábhel" "To Prepare"

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Fāhuelauc "Eve (of a Holiday)"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
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silvercat
cuneiform
cuneiform
Posts: 90
Joined: 16 Feb 2012 19:36
Location: Southern California
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by silvercat »

The last bunch and I'm cheating. All of these mean 'year'

28 Ŋyjichɯn: lɒikyɒtɯa /wɒi.'tyɒ.pɯa/
29 Maanxmuʃt: ɦuonθei /'ɦuon.θei/
30 Ntwkso: rivai /ɾɨ.'vaɨ/
31 Tynthna: tsirrii /tsi.riː/

Bonus:

Ie: kyō7vkyou7 - /khjəv.kjoʊ/ (low tone on both syllables)
Tsɑkø: ægød - /'æ.gød/
my pronouns: they/them or e/em/eirs/emself
Main conlang: Ŋyjichɯn. Other conlangs: Tsɑkø (naming language), Ie, Tynthna, Maanxmuʃt, Ylialis
All my conlangs
Conlanging blog posts
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KaiTheHomoSapien
greek
greek
Posts: 538
Joined: 15 Feb 2016 06:10
Location: Northern California

Re: Lexember 2020

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien »

31st

ápīr - masc. - year

Cf. Lihmelinyan hékuēr

Well that about wraps it up. I'm proud I was able to do this! 31 Arculese words. In the new year I may present an entirely new conlang. [:)]
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