Solenja

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Park Bom
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Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

Solenja is a Romance language (creole) and will be spoken in the Republic of Solenja / on the Island of Solenja.
Image

The Consonants:
Spoiler:
B, C/K, D, F, G, H, J, L, M, N, P, Qu, R, S, T, V, X, Z.

B = /b/ | C/K = /k/ | D = /d/
F = /f/ | G = /ɡ/ | H = /h/, but in the Word its silent.
J = /j/ | L = /l/ | M = /m/
N = /n/ | P = /p/ | Qu = /kv/? This one quark
R = /r/ | S = /s/ | T = /t/
V = /v/ | X = /kz/? as in Mexico or Texas| Z = /s/
Ch = /ç/ church, china, chat i guess^^
The Vowels:
Spoiler:
A, E, I/Y, O, U
A = /a/ as in farm, warm, baum, als
E = /e/& /ɛ/ as in elefant bed and sometimes at the ends of the word /ə/ as in father or feather
I,Y = /i/ as in in, winter, film
O = /o/, as in the German word froh or Mond
U = /u/ as in mund, moon
Diphthongs:
Spoiler:
io = i-jo
ie = i-je
ea = e-ja
ia = i-ja
ou = u
oi = spoiler
————————————————————
Nouns have no gender. There is no conjugation. Solenja has articles, namely La what means The and un what a/an/is.
There are no times in the traditional sense. The time tenses are represented by "io" /ijo/ and "sio" /sijo/ which are placed before the verb.

Tense:
Spoiler:
I eat bread = me como pan. /me komo pa:n/
I ate bread = me io como pan. /me ijo komo pa:n/
I will eat bread = me sio como pan. /me sijo komo pa:n/
Plural:
Spoiler:
pan (bread) > panes (breads)
manzana (apple) > manzanas (apples)
-s or -es
Infinitive:
Spoiler:
como (eat) > comer (to eat) /komɛr/
bebo (drink) > beber (to drink) /bebɛr/
Adjective:
Spoiler:
to build a adjective in Solenja is easy. -eado or -so
La sol (the sun) > soleado (sunny) /so:l/ /sole'ado/.
La nubo (the cloud) > nubeado (cloudy) /nubo/ /nube'ado/
La nebulo (the fog) > nebuloso (foggy) /nebulo/ /nebuloso/
Verb(etc.) to Job:
Spoiler:
pan (bread) > panero (bake) > panaderia (bakery) > panadero (baker)
/pa:n/, /panero/, /panaderija/, /panadero/
———
vendo (sell) > vendero (seller)
/vɛndo/, /vɛndero/
Negation:
Spoiler:
olvido (forget) > olvidia (forgetful) > no olvidia (unforgettable)
/olvido/, /olvidija/, /no olvidija/
The Numbers can be build by just using 1-10
Eleven for example is 10 + 1 zeche una.
Twenty one is 2+10+1 doszeche una

Pronouns:
Spoiler:
Me /me/ | i, me
Tu /tu/ | you
Li /li/ | he
Voze /vose/ | she
Eso /eso/ | it
Nos /nos/ | we
Ti /ti/ | you plural
Ili /ili/ | they
Numbers:
Spoiler:

Una one /una/
Dos two /dos/
Tres three /trɛs/
Quatro four /kvatro/
Sinco five /sinko/
Ses six /sɛs/
Sep seven /sɛp/
Oito eight /oito/
Nueve nine /nuevə/
Zeche ten /seçə/
Siento hundred /siɛnto/
mil thousand /mil/
siento mil hundred thousand /siɛnto mil/
milliona million /milliona/
milliarda billion /milliarda/

Two examples for a sentence in Solenja.
Spoiler:

The bird flew into the cage.
La pajaro io vuelo en la gabbia.
/la pajaro io vuelo ɛn la gabbia/

[DEF.ART bird PST fly in DEF.ART cage.]

———
She baked a cake for her wife.
voze io panero una pastel por ​tia mulher.
/vose io panero una pastɛl por tia mulɛr/
[3SG PST bake INDEF.ART cake for 3PL.POSS woman.
i guess it’s right...

Word stress and syllables:
Spoiler:
The bird flew into the cage.
La pa-ja-ro i-o vu-e-lo en la gab-bißa.
/la pajaro ijo vuelo ɛn la gabbija/
[DEF.ART bird PST fly in DEF.ART cage.]

———
She baked a cake for her wife.
vo-ze i-o pa-ne-ro u-na pas-tel por ​ti-ja mu-lher.
/vose ijo panero una pastɛl por tia mulɛr/
[3SG PST bake INDEF.ART cake for 3PL.POSS woman.
Yes/No-Questions:
Spoiler:
Is your name Paul? Yes it is.
esta tua nombre Paul? Si (esta)/(este es).
is 2SG.POSS name Paul? Yes (is)/(this is).

are you okay? no, im not okay.
esta tu bona? no, no esta bona.
is 2SG good? no, no is good.
W-Questions:
Spoiler:

What is your name? - My name is Paul.
Ke esta tua nombre? - Mea nombre esta Paul.
What is 2SG.POSS name? - 1SG.POSS name is Paul.

what is your profession? - my profession is doctor.
ke esta tua profesion? - mea profesion esta doctor.
what is 2SG.POSS profession? - 1SG.POSS esta doctor.

How are you? - I’m fine.
Come esta? - esta bona.
How is? - is good.

Where are you from? - I’m from Germany.
De donde esta tu? - Me esta de Germania.
from-where is 2SG? - 1SG is from germany.

how many siblings do you have? - I have two siblings.
quanto irmans tu tengo? - me tengo dos irmans.
how-many siblings 2SG have? - 1SG have two siblings.

Where are you live? - I live in London.
Donde tu vivo? - me vivo en London.
Where 2SG live? - 1SG live in London

When are you here? - i'll be there soon.
Quando tu esta aki? - me breve esta ahi.
When 2SG are here? - 1SG soon is there.

Who is your mother? - Maria is my mother.
kien esta tua madre? - Maria esta mea madre.
Who is 2SG.POSS mother? - Maria is 1SG.POSS mother.

whose book is this? - Peter's book.
cuyo libro es este? - La libro de Peter.
whose book is this? - DEF.ART book from Peter.

Why are you drink beer? - because i like beer.
por-ke tu bebo zerveza? - pois me sato zerveza.
Why 2SG drink beer? - because 1SG like beer.

maybe more.
all rules & other stuff:
Spoiler:
Adjective come after the object.
esta un dia solinia > it is a sunny day.
is INDEF.ART. day sunny.
esta means „am“, „are“ & „is“

the seasons do not have an adjective form.
———
I eat bread = me como pan. /me komo pa:n/
I ate bread = me io como pan. /me ijo komo pa:n/
I will eat bread = me sio como pan. /me sijo komo pa:n/
io is the past marker and sio the future marker.
———
im sick /me ɛnfɛrmo/ & the sickness /la ɛnfɛrmo/
———
The Numbers are just build by 1-10.
———
Solenja has 1PL We (nos) what also us means. 2PL Ihr(german/ english you) (ti) and 3Pl They (ili).
———
to the = al | on/at the = sur. on the wall, at the tree.
sur la muro & sur la albero.

at (place) en la [in the]. at the bakery > en la panaderia.
En la panaderia daro esta pan. There is bread in the bakery.
in DEF.ART bakery give it bread.

at (person) con [with].
Me io olvido mea libro con peter. I forgot my book with peter.
1SG PST forgot my book with peter.

in = en | in the = en la | from = de | to = a.
if i copy a sentence structure, than spanish or portuguese.
Image
Image

I try to answer all your questions :)
Last edited by Park Bom on 20 Jun 2021 04:49, edited 52 times in total.
Khemehekis
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Re: Solenja

Post by Khemehekis »

First question: Is this a divergent Romance language, or is it a creole (like Lingua Franca Nova)?
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Re: Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

I would say yes, i think.
I wanted, to be easy(easier).
i didn't know Lingua Franca Nova.

Solenja is based on: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Basque, Romanian, maybe Esperanto and one more.
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Re: Solenja

Post by Khemehekis »

Park Bom wrote: 05 May 2021 21:06 I would say yes, i think.
That wasn't a yes-or-no question.

Is it:

(a) A divergent Romance language

or

(b) A creole
?
i didn't know Lingua Franca Nova.
Lingua Franca Nova, or LFN, by the late C. George Boeree, is an auxlang based on Romance lexicon with a creole's grammar.
Solenja is based on: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Basque, Romanian, maybe Esperanto and one more.
Esperanto? Is this an auxlang? Or is it an artlang? You said it was spoken on an island.
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Re: Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

Solenja is a creole.
Esperanto is a auxlang, if you mean this.

Solenja was started as a „artlang“ but it would be me happy, if it comes to a auxlang.

Yes, my language is spoken on my fictional island.

:)
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Re: Solenja

Post by Khemehekis »

Park Bom wrote: 05 May 2021 21:20 Solenja is a creole.
Ah, I see. That was what I suspected. Romance without genders nor articles!
Esperanto is a auxlang, if you mean this.
Well, no one's debating that Esperanto's an auxlang, but basing your Solenja partially on Esperanto made me wonder if Solenja was an auxlang too.
Solenja was started as a „artlang“ but it would be me happy, if it comes to a auxlang.

Yes, my language is spoken on my fictional island.
So it's a fictional language (artlang) and a creole. Got it.

Thanks for clearing that up.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 72,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

your welcome.
I often subconsciously confuse people somehow ... and my bad english make it not better^^

Solenja has articles, namely La what means The and un what a/an/is.
Last edited by Park Bom on 11 May 2021 18:03, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Solenja

Post by Khemehekis »

Park Bom wrote: 05 May 2021 18:48 H = House, but in the Word its silent.
You mean it's silent in the middle of the word, but pronounced /h/ like in "house" at the beginning of a word?
father/feather (the E at the end of many german words)
This is the vowel /ɐ/, as in "bitte".
O = of
So you're saying this is /ʌ/ (the sound of the U in "cut")?

Also: How did Esperanto become a contributing language? Was there a sizeable Esperanto-speaking community on the island, along with the speakers of the Romance natlang from which Solenja evolved and the speakers of the "exotic" language that influenced its simple grammar?
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31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Solenja

Post by Khemehekis »

Park Bom wrote: 05 May 2021 21:32 Solenja has articles, namely La what means The and una what a/an/one is.
Ah, I see, reading it again: no genders, no verb conjugation, and no tenses (tenses are what "times" like past, present, or future are called in English). Somehow I misremembered that as no articles.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 72,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

You mean it's silent in the middle of the word, but pronounced /h/ like in "house" at the beginning of a word?
Yes :)
So you're saying this is /ʌ/ (the sound of the U in "cut")?
How you say of? O like in So, or, Ort, Mond etc.

The Esperanto thing. Not every word is shitty^^
I used 5 languages and seldom Esperanto.

:)
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Re: Solenja

Post by Khemehekis »

Park Bom wrote: 05 May 2021 21:43
You mean it's silent in the middle of the word, but pronounced /h/ like in "house" at the beginning of a word?
Yes :)
OK.
So you're saying this is /ʌ/ (the sound of the U in "cut")?
How you say of? O like in So, or, Ort, Mond etc.
"Of" has a sound that doesn't exist in German. It's the vowel /ʌ/, as on "love", "come", "something", "cut", "cup", "jump", "hug", "brother", "buddy", etc., at least when people want to say the word strongly, like when they're singing a song that rhymes "love" with "dreaming of".

But sometimes we just use the schwa: /əv/. That's in quick, everyday speech, in sentences wherein "of" is an unimportant word.

The O in "or" is /ɔ/, like the vowel in German "Ort". We have the vowel in "horse", "fork", "New York", "dork", "course", "port", "form", "normal", "morning", "mourn", "door", "floor", "pour", and words like that.

The O in German "so" is /o/. Most English dialects don't have /o/ as a standalone vowel, but American English speakers have the diphthong /ou/ for words like "so", "stone", "cold", "joke", "trophy", "sofa", "hope", "gold", "old", "goal", "soul", "low", "go", "toe", "doughnut", and "brooch". This is called "long O" in English.

The letter O can also make the vowel sound /ɑ/, called "short O", like the A in German "Art". This appears in "Tom", "mom", "on", "rob", "Bob", "John", "soft", "clock", "Josh", "God", "pot", "top", "stop", "box", and "off". There's also "dog", although some dialects pronounce the O in "dog" as an /ɔ/. In British English, these words have the vowel /ɒ/.
The Esperanto thing. Not every word is shitty|_|
I used 5 languages and seldom Esperanto.
OK.

Is it descended from proto-Iberian, or languages like French, or languages like Italian? What is its ancestor?

Or did all four of those Romance languages, plus Basque, bring speakers to the island, causing the developers of the creole to borrow different words from different modern Romance languages?
Last edited by Khemehekis on 05 May 2021 22:05, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

"Of" has a sound that doesn't exist in German. It's the vowel /ʌ/, as on "love", "come", "something", "cut", "cup", "jump", "hug", "brother", "buddy", etc., at least when people want to say the word strongly, like when they're singing a song that rhymes "love" with "dreaming of".

But sometimes we just use the schwa: /əv/. That's in quick, everyday speech, in sentences wherein "of" is an unimportant word.

The O in "or" is /ɔ/, like the vowel in German "Ort". We have the vowel in "horse", "fork", "New York", "dork", "course", "port", "form", "normal", "morning", "mourn", "door", "floor", "pour", and words like that.

The O in German "so" is /o/. Most English dialects don't have /o/ as a standalone vowel, but American English speakers have the diphthong /ou/ for words like "so", "stone", "cold", "joke", "trophy", "sofa", "hope", "gold", "old", "goal", "soul", "low", "go", "toe", "doughnut", and "brooch". This is called "long O" in English.

The letter O can also make the vowel sound /ɑ/, called "short O", like the A in German "Art". This appears in "Tom", "mom", "on", "rob", "Bob", "John", "soft", "clock", "Josh", "God", "pot", "top", "stop", "box", and "off". There's also "dog", although some dialects
God... o.o
the simple german O... fork, sofa, go, ort etc...


I think the most words are coming from spain/portugal.
the others language are not so often be used.
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Re: Solenja

Post by Khemehekis »

Here's an idea!

Go to this chart where you can hear the sounds spoken:

https://www.ipachart.com/

and tell me which IPA symbol the O in Solenja sounds like!
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Re: Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

The Close-mid O.
I think, we have in german only the short and long O...
[:P]
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Re: Solenja

Post by Khemehekis »

We don't have that in English.

Instead of using an English example, just use the IPA symbol and say "This is the sound /o/, as in the German word 'froh'."
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 72,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

Thank you, i have edit it. :)
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Re: Solenja

Post by Khemehekis »

Park Bom wrote: 05 May 2021 22:28 Thank you, i have edit it. :)
You're welcome.

Vowels can be confusing, so they should all use IPA symbols.
A = farm
E = test, father/feather (the E at the end of many german words)
I,Y = in
O = /o/, as in the German word „froh“ or „Mond“
U = full
The A in "farm" is /ɑ/, like the A in German "Art".

The I in "in" is /ɪ/, like the I in German "sind".

The U in "full" is /ʊ/, like the U in the German word "Butter". (We have "butter" in English too, but we pronounce the U as an /ʌ/.)

E is tricky. The E in "test" is /ɛ/. This is the sound in German "besser". The E at the end of German words like "bitte" is /ɐ/. The -er at the end of English "father" and "feather" is an /ɚ/, though.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 72,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

i have edit All vowels.
Questions you never asked yourself ^^

[<3]

Edit: now realy, wrong end e symbol^^
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Re: Solenja

Post by Salmoneus »

I'd just like to point out: take some of what Khemehekis says with a big pinch of salt, because he's talking about his own, American dialect.


In particular: Americans usually have the same sound in "of" and "cut", but the rest of the world doesn't. For the rest of us (well, a lot of us, I don't know about, eg, Canadians?), "of" has the same vowel as "dog", "cloth", etc - what Khem calls "short O".

Likewise, the description Khem gives of the final sound of 'father' is accurate for Americans, but in southern England, Africa and the Antipodes, this sound has lost its rhotic quality entirely and merged with the final vowel in 'comma'.





If you want more discussion:
Spoiler:
[I'm a bit confused by Khem's "O"s. First, "short O" is a bit of a misleading name in American, because this category also includes words with "A" - palm, father, car, etc (this vowel set has a different vowel from the 'short O' set outside the US). A couple of his words actually aren't in the "short O" set at all for most Americans - "soft" and "off", as well as "dog", instead have the vowel of "caught" and "law" (as they do in old-fashioned, but not modern, British). This vowel is /ɔ/, and is indeed also the vowel that non-Americans tend to have in "fork", "horse", "port", etc. However, in American dialects, the sound in "horse", "fork", etc is often raised to /o/ instead, particularly in dialects that otherwise merge /ɔ/ with the "short O" vowel. Oh, and in traditional non-American dialects, "mourn" has another vowel from these entirely, but admittedly that's gradually dying out.]

Oh, and in a lot of American, the "long O" sound actually is a monopthongal /o/. Conversely, apparently in parts of northern Germany and Austria, German /o/ can actually be a diphthong, as in most English.

Anyway, traditionally German has two "O" sounds, distinguished by both length and quality: long /o:/ and short /ɔ/. It can also get more complicated before R.
English, however, traditionally has at least THREE "O" sounds: long /o:/ (which is actually more like /ou/ in most dialects) AND /ɔ:/, and short /ɒ/ (which most Americans merge with an "A" sound) - but which words have which sound varies between dialects. I can't speak for Americans, but English people hearing German, because our /ɔ:/ is long, often hear German short /ɔ/ as our short /ɒ/.

So, for me, "fork", "sofa" and "dog" (and "mourn") all have different vowels in them!

[it used to be worse: hoarse and horse used to have different vowels too. Fortunately that's almost extinct now.]
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Re: Solenja

Post by Park Bom »

Thank you Salmoneus for your input / explanation. [:3]
English is just complicated...
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