Ahápaké: The Language of the Foxes

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kiwikami
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Re: Ahápaké: The Language of the Foxes

Post by kiwikami »

Just wanted to say that I am absolutely keeping an eye on this language - love some Navajo inspiration and interesting aspectual shenanigans!
Edit: Substituted a string instrument for a French interjection.

:eng: :mrgreen: | :fra: [:)] | ASL [:S] | :deu: [:|] | :tan: [:(] | :nav: [:'(]
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Osia
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Re: Ahápaké: The Language of the Foxes

Post by Osia »

kiwikami wrote: 30 Jul 2021 03:03 Just wanted to say that I am absolutely keeping an eye on this language - love some Navajo inspiration and interesting aspectual shenanigans!
Thanks! It's really encouraging to see that so many people like this!

A bit of a short post today, I've been really busy with classes (well technically "class"). I was also really struggling to think of more things to describe about adjectives. If anyone could suggest ideas for things to elaborate on, it would be greatly appreciated.

Adjectives

Adjectives in Ahapa behave more like verbs than nouns in their morphology and syntax, but have key differences from verbs in a number of areas. Adjectives are marked for subject, negative, mood, and take the relative marker -da when they occur in attributive position, but do not take aspect, valency, or evidentiality markers. Adjectives behave differently when reduplicated and have different meanings with certain particles than verbs do. Adjectives can also be freely derived into verbs with the suffix -de, though this is uncommon. The adjective morphology template is given below:

preverb-subject-negative-root-irrealis-relative-mood

As you can see, the morphology is similar to verbs but a lot of things that verbs are marked for are missing.

Adjective roots behave phonologically like verb roots, they consist of short low tone vowels. Adjectives can occur in serial constructions like verbs, but are more limited, they commonly occur in comparative constructions preceded by the verb -ksi- "exceed", and in superlative constructions preceded by the verb -bas- "to be best". Reduplicating an adjective makes that adjective an intensive:

xihaman!
xi-ham~ham
1s.SUB-be_hungry~INTS
"I'm really hungry!"

while with a verb it expresses that the action is urgent or important:

dúhagiwgewisá!
dú-ha-giw~giw-i-sá
need_to-2s.SUB-follow_instructions~URG-HAB-IMP
"You need to follow instructions!"
she/her/hers
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[<3] Navajo, Tlingit, Polysynthesis, Semantics
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Omzinesý
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Re: Ahápaké: The Language of the Foxes

Post by Omzinesý »

I remembered this lang when making my latest one. Is it still active?
My meta-thread: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=5760
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