Showcase Your Conlang

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Üdj
rupestrian
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Showcase Your Conlang

Post by Üdj »

This is pretty simple. Showcase your conlang's phonology, its grammar, and maybe some of the lexicon. Ask for feedback, suggest things - this is mostly just for demonstration of everything the conlang community can do. I'm so excited to see what people have come up with!
/ɸ/, /ʍ/, and /ɴ/ are great sounds, and nothing you say can convince me otherwise.

Native: :usa: Conversational (on a good day): :bra: Moderate: :epo:
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Reyzadren
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Re: Showcase Your Conlang

Post by Reyzadren »

This is a short summary of my conlang's phonology, grammar and some of the lexicon. /'griuskant/ griuskant belongs to its mixed fantasy fictional world.

* Phonology

These are the phonemes in script order:
/p t k s b d g z/
/m n ŋ ʃ w j ɣ ʒ/
/r tʃ f h l dʒ v θ/
/a i ɔ u ə e Y ɯ/

All words have initial stress.
CCCV*CCC maximum for each syllable.


* Grammar

Typology: agglutinative morphology, SVO word order, trigger alignment, head-final directionality.
Other features: Affixes, prepositions, no definiteness, no tenses, no agreement conjugations.

Word types: noun, verb, adjective, particle.
8 prefixes, 10 suffixes.

There is very little grammar in my conlang, so there is not much to talk about it here.


* Lexicon

I can't type the conscript here, so I'll leave a romanisation and its gloss below for a sample sentence.

aesk paeda zher xeka shaigauae roetzaev thak puathai stomsdratae merg,, vazh veyeti ovush.
/'esk 'peda ʒər 'ɣəka 'ʃaigaue 'rɯtzev θak 'puaθai 'stɔmsdrate 'mərg, vaʒ 'vəjəti 'ɔvuʃ./
1SG sit-V then write-V now-day-POSS entry down swing-V-A coconut-tree-POSS shelter attribution gentle-A illusion
I sit and write today's entry under the canopy of a swaying palm tree. What a tender illusion.

Image

More info and links can be found in the griuskant thread here on this forum, or in my signature. I appreciate feedback regarding technical errors (broken links, script not displayed, typos etc) from all members.
Image griuskant thread | Image conlang summary
Solarius
roman
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Re: Showcase Your Conlang

Post by Solarius »

My conlang Hayakan is probably my most developed language, and has been worked on on and off for several years. Early outdated forms can be found in this forum, but the current version is much more fleshed out and very different.

In broad strokes:
Phoneme Inventory:
/p pʰ ɓ t tʰ ɗ t͡s t͡sʰ k kʰ/
/f s h/
/m n ŋ/
/l r j w ɰ/

/i e ɛ a ɔ o u ɯ/

Has a relatively strict syllable structure of (C)V(C1)(C2), where C represents all consonants and V all vowels. C1 represents the consonants /m n ŋ l r/, and C2 represents any consonant which is identical to the following (i.e., the first element of a geminate).

Right-edged weight sensitive stress, with stress on the penult unless it lacks a coda and the final syllable has one.

Morphosyntactic Highlights include:
-Overwhelmingly right-branching in nearly all domains--strongly prefixing, VSO word order, etc. Aside from the necessative suffix, the only suffixes are borrowed derivational morphemes.
-Light inflection (comparable to English), but with the present affixation is very firmly head-marking. Person and number marking on posessed nouns, inflected prepositions, etc.
-Minimal-Augmented pronouns
-A numeral system partially based on body parts
-A fair amount of sensitivity to definiteness in syntax--definite direct objects take a special preposition.

Other Highlights include:
-Hayakan is a pluricentric language, despite being spoken in one country, with the northern regions using one variety and the southern regions using another. This is rooted in a strong historical divide between dialects, a la Gheg-Tosk.
-Use of a syllabary, which has been substantially "regularized." A fun feature is that syllabograms representing common codas take a diacritical mark to indicate that they aren't synharmonic in situations where they could be--i.e. /kin/ is written <KI-NI> but /kini/ is written <KI-NÍ> (or something similar--I haven't actually made the glyphs yet, just mapped out the principles).
-Hayakan exists in our world, so it has influence from real languages, especially English, since Hayaka was a British colony.
Nortaneous
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Re: Showcase Your Conlang

Post by Nortaneous »

There are a number of languages in the world. Due to failings of virtue, the important ones are less documented than the obscure ones.

One known important language is Zzyxwqnp, the arguable official language of the empire (loose confederation) of Zzxzzyx, the origins of which are lost to the sands of time - officially, of course, it emerged as a coordinated military response to the eastward excursions of the Katnahl warlord Shquqou after they expelled the Cihlae from the port of Bayan, which was not supported by the Tsi decarchy, who are our friends until they hurry up and die and leave us to pick over their bones.

Zzyxwqnp has, in the native grammatical tradition, the following sounds:
Kqpmq: [a ɒ e ə o]
Chanye bbqx: [ʔ h]
Chanye pyt: [pʰ p mb f t̪ʰ t̪ n̪d̪ tsʰ ts ndz s tʂʰ tʂ ndʐ ʂ tɕʰ tɕ ndʑ ɕ kʰ k ŋg x]
Tonpkztye ggytkqpmq: [w j v z ʐ ʑ]
Tonpkztye ggytchan: [m n ȵ ŋ l]

In the west, where they used to speak Narng, they have funny ideas about the chan and tonpkzt, and add [θ ɳ]; and in the most obscure corners of the inland south, the distinction of chan into bbqx and pyt does not exist, and they say [tʰm̩̂] for [ʔm̩̂] and [ndʑæsn̩] for [ndʑahn̩].

The grammar is not terribly interesting. The typical Vengic contrast between major and minor verbs has specialized into a benefactive-honorific, and, as with most languages more inland than Hlu, most inherited words have been extended with formatives, which in the hurried speech of Bayan have been reduced to tongue-twisters impossible for and unbefitting of a true gentleman. The grammar, while less abbreviated than that of the Zot (for whom two chan and two kqpmq can encode a whole sentence), is less repetitive than that of Narng, Hlu, or even the filthy jargon of the repulsive Kemertenites who believe we all ought to abandon civilization and live naked and drunk in the woods. (There's nothing but extremes with the Katnahl - when they're not Kemertenites, they're Metkorists, petrified with fear of Qapi Mongkoush, who they'll swear up and down appeared to them in a bolt of fire once. You have to go all the way to Bakhzon to find a normal one.)

For example, the first words of the Stele of Xanrrvn in Zzyxwqnp are:

/kwũ˧twa˥˩=dʑwə njə-tsji˩ jwu˧tʂwã˧ kwa˥-jə tsja˥˩-mwã-jə ja˥tə̃˥/
[kũ˧tɒ˧˩dʑo˩ ndʑe˩tɕi˩ ju˧tʂɒ̃˧ kɒ˥je˧ tɕa˧˩mɒ̃˩je˩ ja˥tə̃˥]

Or in the Western dialect:

[kʰuntɔ̂ʒ=əntʃiwɔ jǔtʃɔŋ kə tʃɛ̂-mɔj játəŋ]

Whereas in Hlu they'd be rendered something like:

/n̥ɯç tʰu kɯɲ ɗɤ çim̥un m̥ɔçɔksɔ m̥ɔɬiⁿbjopʰutʰukɔ/

Unfortunately I haven't even started on Narng yet and forget how the language of the Kemertenites works, but all four are related.
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Üdj
rupestrian
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Posts: 22
Joined: 07 Sep 2022 00:24

Re: Showcase Your Conlang

Post by Üdj »

Kaze: The (Maybe) Most Simple Language Ever (Grammatically)

(Kaze is by no means naturalistic; it's an engelang.)

Kaze's consonants are:
/p t k b d g/ <p t k b d g>
/m n/ <m n>
/v s z x/ <v s z x>
/r l w j/ <r l w j>

Kaze's vowels are:
/a e i o u y æ ø/ <a e i o u ü ä ö>

Kaze's syllable structure is very simple: (C)V(fricative).

Kaze's grammar is as follows:
Word order is free with regard to subject, verb, and object; nothing about something's role in a sentence is indicated by its position.
Kaze is otherwise head-initial.

Verbs receive the prefix j(ä)- to indicate that the subject and object are the opposite of what is expected.

This is all the grammar that exists in the entire language.

Example:
Meseki tü vas xu sawö.
meat of pig 1pro eat
"I eat/have eaten/will eat pork."

Meseki tü vas xu jäsawö.
meat of pig 1pro UNX-eat (the UNX stands for "unexpected")
"Pork eats/has eaten/will eat me."
/ɸ/, /ʍ/, and /ɴ/ are great sounds, and nothing you say can convince me otherwise.

Native: :usa: Conversational (on a good day): :bra: Moderate: :epo:
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Üdj
rupestrian
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Posts: 22
Joined: 07 Sep 2022 00:24

Re: Showcase Your Conlang

Post by Üdj »

(When it's ambiguous, as in "I kill the monster" vs. "the monster kills me," it is assumed that without the suffix, the more pessimistic option is being used.)
/ɸ/, /ʍ/, and /ɴ/ are great sounds, and nothing you say can convince me otherwise.

Native: :usa: Conversational (on a good day): :bra: Moderate: :epo:
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VaptuantaDoi
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Joined: 18 Nov 2019 07:35

Re: Showcase Your Conlang

Post by VaptuantaDoi »

Üdj wrote: 20 Sep 2022 03:12 Verbs receive the prefix j(ä)- to indicate that the subject and object are the opposite of what is expected.
This is traditionally called a "direct-inverse" alignment.
Üdj wrote: 20 Sep 2022 03:14 (When it's ambiguous, as in "I kill the monster" vs. "the monster kills me," it is assumed that without the suffix, the more pessimistic option is being used.)
What if there is not more "pessimistic" option, like "I saw him" vs "he saw me"? Direct-inverse languages typically have a hierarchy of some kind which sets out which types of noun phrases are considered the more expected subject.
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Üdj
rupestrian
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Posts: 22
Joined: 07 Sep 2022 00:24

Re: Showcase Your Conlang

Post by Üdj »

VaptuantaDoi wrote: 20 Sep 2022 10:36 What if there is not more "pessimistic" option, like "I saw him" vs "he saw me"? Direct-inverse languages typically have a hierarchy of some kind which sets out which types of noun phrases are considered the more expected subject.
Here's the new way it works:

- If there is one option more expected than the other, it is the default.
- If one option is more pessimistic and neither is more expected, it is the default.
- Otherwise, assume that the 1st person is the subject.
- If there is no 1st person, the 2nd person is the subject.
- Otherwise, the animate is assumed to be the subject.
- If both are animate or both are inanimate, you're out of luck unless one of the previous options applies.
/ɸ/, /ʍ/, and /ɴ/ are great sounds, and nothing you say can convince me otherwise.

Native: :usa: Conversational (on a good day): :bra: Moderate: :epo:
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