False cognates

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Shemtov
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Re: False cognates

Post by Shemtov »

Salmoneus wrote: 12 Aug 2020 13:34 [indeed, apparently this is theorised for Latin, explaining why it uses /s/ in borrowings from Hebrew: shabat>sabbath, jeshua > jesus.]

I thought that was because Latin and Greek did not have post-alveolar sounds, so the closest to the Hebrew post-alveolar sibalant was /s/.
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GrandPiano
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Re: False cognates

Post by GrandPiano »

Salmoneus wrote: 12 Aug 2020 13:34...can you really rule out cases of similarity only due to later sound changes, when those soundchanges are themselves common, or areally common?
Okay, that's also a good point, but it just occurred to me that there's another argument against a connection between aurum and urre via a non-Italic IE language: the word aurum seems to be specific to Italic. According to Wiktionary, aurum comes from PIE *h₂é-h₂us-o-m, which it doesn't list as having any descendants outside of Italic. *h₂é-h₂us-o-m is derived from the root *h₂ews- "dawn, east". Now, is it possible that an ancient non-Italic IE language also had a word derived from that root that underwent the same semantic shift to "gold" and underwent sound changes to become something resembling urre (or rather urhe, since that seems to be the form of the word in dialects of Basque that retain /h/)? Sure, but it seems fairly unlikely to me (apparently Proto-Tocharian also got its word for "gold" from that root, but the word looks nothing like urhe). I think it's fair to consider them false cognates as long as there's no clear reason to believe that they're cognates?
:eng: - Native
:chn: - B2
:esp: - A2
:jpn: - A2
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Shemtov
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Re: False cognates

Post by Shemtov »

Nederlands & :eng: <pin> :deu: <Pinn> :de-nw: <pinn> "Pin" VS. Mishnaic :isr: /pijn/ "Pin tumbler lock"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
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Re: False cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

English fire v.s. Thai ไฟ /fāj/ "fire"
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
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