False cognates

A forum for discussing linguistics or just languages in general.
User avatar
WeepingElf
sinic
sinic
Posts: 288
Joined: 23 Feb 2016 18:42
Location: Braunschweig, Germany
Contact:

Re: False cognates

Post by WeepingElf »

German Kapuze means 'hood' rather than 'coat', but the etymology you give is IMHO probably correct.
... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
User avatar
k1234567890y
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2392
Joined: 04 Jan 2014 04:47
Contact:

Re: False cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

English stall and stable(noun.)

The former is ultimately from PIE *stel-; the latter is ultimately from PIE *steh₂-; however, it is possible that *stel- is a root extension of *steh₂-, if *stel- is a root extension of *steh₂-, the the English words will be true cognates, though a pretty distant one.

I posted this because I just found out that the Romanian cognate of English stable(noun.) is staul, which is reasonably similar to stall in spelling and pronounciation.
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
User avatar
WeepingElf
sinic
sinic
Posts: 288
Joined: 23 Feb 2016 18:42
Location: Braunschweig, Germany
Contact:

Re: False cognates

Post by WeepingElf »

k1234567890y wrote: 15 Jul 2022 20:38 English stall and stable(noun.)

The former is ultimately from PIE *stel-; the latter is ultimately from PIE *steh₂-; however, it is possible that *stel- is a root extension of *steh₂-, if *stel- is a root extension of *steh₂-, the the English words will be true cognates, though a pretty distant one.
I am not sure, but I do think that *stel- is indeed related to *steh₂- in some way. It would surprise me if there was no connection at all.
... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
User avatar
k1234567890y
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2392
Joined: 04 Jan 2014 04:47
Contact:

Re: False cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

WeepingElf wrote: 15 Jul 2022 20:45
k1234567890y wrote: 15 Jul 2022 20:38 English stall and stable(noun.)

The former is ultimately from PIE *stel-; the latter is ultimately from PIE *steh₂-; however, it is possible that *stel- is a root extension of *steh₂-, if *stel- is a root extension of *steh₂-, the the English words will be true cognates, though a pretty distant one.
I am not sure, but I do think that *stel- is indeed related to *steh₂- in some way. It would surprise me if there was no connection at all.
you are right, *stel- could be a root extension of *steh₂-, but currently we are not sure about this.
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
User avatar
Sequor
sinic
sinic
Posts: 388
Joined: 30 Jun 2012 06:13

Re: False cognates

Post by Sequor »

English mirror < Old French mireor (literally "watcher")
Arabic مرآة mirʔā 'mirror' (formed with the mi- instrument prefix and the root r-ʔ-y, cf. the verb رأى‎ raʔā 'to see')

Although French Wiktionary informs me that at least one etymologist (Antoine-Paulin Pihan) thinks the French word is a borrowing from Arabic. I doubt it though: Ibero-Romance doesn't have the Arabic borrowing, Catalan has a similar formation but using a different suffix (mirall), and Old English apparently had sċēawere which is also literally "watcher"—maybe it's a calque in some direction or other.
hīc sunt linguificēs. hēr bēoþ tungemakeras.
User avatar
Sequor
sinic
sinic
Posts: 388
Joined: 30 Jun 2012 06:13

Re: False cognates

Post by Sequor »

English corner (a borrowing from Anglo-Norman / Old French, derived from Latin cornū 'horn')
Sanskrit कोण koṇa- 'corner' (a borrowing from Dravidian)
hīc sunt linguificēs. hēr bēoþ tungemakeras.
User avatar
Shemtov
runic
runic
Posts: 3229
Joined: 29 Apr 2013 04:06

Re: False cognates

Post by Shemtov »

Shoshoni /nɨwɨ/ "Shoshoni Person" vs Nahuatl <Nahua> /Nawa/ "Nahua Person". Despite being self-designations for Uto-Aztecan speaking people, that are of the form /nVwV/ these are unrelated. First of all, Shoshoni /ɨ/ corresponds to Nahuan /e/. Second of all, /w/ in Shoshoni can come from PUA *m, and there are other Numic languages where the form is /nɨmɨ/, and the *m>w shift is unique to Central Numic, and has no convergent shift elsewhere in UA .
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
User avatar
Sequor
sinic
sinic
Posts: 388
Joined: 30 Jun 2012 06:13

Re: False cognates

Post by Sequor »

Korean 많이 'a lot', pronounced [mani]
English many
hīc sunt linguificēs. hēr bēoþ tungemakeras.
User avatar
Sequor
sinic
sinic
Posts: 388
Joined: 30 Jun 2012 06:13

Re: False cognates

Post by Sequor »

Hebrew דֶּרֶךְ dérekh 'road'
Russian доро́га 'road'
Mandarin 道路 dàolù 'road'
hīc sunt linguificēs. hēr bēoþ tungemakeras.
User avatar
k1234567890y
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2392
Joined: 04 Jan 2014 04:47
Contact:

Re: False cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

Arabic وَسَط‎ (wasaṭ) "middle, centre, waist" / Egyptian Arabic وسط‎ (weṣṭ) "middle, centre, waist"

English waist
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
User avatar
qwed117
mongolian
mongolian
Posts: 4000
Joined: 20 Nov 2014 02:27

Re: False cognates

Post by qwed117 »

:usa: English bezel vs. :usa: bevel, both referring to sloping edges that are not perpendicular to a face, the former in gemstone cutting, and the latter in most other uses.

Both words are from Old French. Bezel is from biseau, a variant of bijou 'gem', from a Breton bisoù 'ring'. Bevel is from French baïf "open-mouthed, gaping", from Medieval Latin bado, 'to yawn', of onomatopoeic origin.
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

The SqwedgePad
User avatar
Dormouse559
moderator
moderator
Posts: 2944
Joined: 10 Nov 2012 20:52
Location: California

Re: False cognates

Post by Dormouse559 »

:eng: heriot - a payment made to a lord on the death of tenant

I thought the word might be connected to heir and heritage, so ultimately from Latin heres. The TV program that used the term said a heriot allowed a family to inherit the land lease from their dead family member. Also, -ot looks like a French diminutive. Turns out the term is purely Germanic, from OE hereġeatwa, which literally means "army gear." That makes more sense in light of another meaning Wiktionary gives: the return of military equipment.
Post Reply