False cognates

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All4Ɇn
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Re: False cognates

Post by All4Ɇn »

eldin raigmore wrote: 26 Jan 2021 03:12 I seriously thought (still think?) “lazuli” had etymology in common with “azure”?
Those two have the same origin etymologically. Azure comes from French which dropped the initial /l/, perceiving it to be the definite article.
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WeepingElf
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Re: False cognates

Post by WeepingElf »

All4Ɇn wrote: 26 Jan 2021 02:11 :chn: 吠瑠璃 fèi liú lí "lapis lazuli" & :jpn: 瑠璃 ruri "lapis lazuli"
:eng: (lapis) lazuli
liú lí and ruri are both remarkably similar sounding to lazuli but are etymologically unrelated. The Chinese and Japanese word comes from Sanskrit while the English one comes from Persian.
But Sanskrit and Persian are related languages - not knowing the actual words, are they perhaps cognate?
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Re: False cognates

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I doubt it. For one thing the final -i in the English is clearly from Latin, not the original Persian, so that brings the intersection down to just two phonemes, /ul/, unless we count /z ~ l/ as an intersection. The etymology given on Wiktionary eliminates even this correspondence, and although with words like this ... Wanderworts i guess .... I always allow for the possibility that we just don't know for sure, I dont think it's likely.
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Re: False cognates

Post by Shemtov »

Pabappa wrote: 27 Jan 2021 17:43 I doubt it. For one thing the final -i in the English is clearly from Latin, not the original Persian, so that brings the intersection down to just two phonemes, /ul/, unless we count /z ~ l/ as an intersection. The etymology given on Wiktionary eliminates even this correspondence, and although with words like this ... Wanderworts i guess .... I always allow for the possibility that we just don't know for sure, I dont think it's likely.
Checking on it, the Sanskrit originally meant "Beryl", and is of "unknown origin" itself, while the Persian is tracible to an established PIE root.
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Re: False cognates

Post by WeepingElf »

I see.
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All4Ɇn
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Re: False cognates

Post by All4Ɇn »

:hun: metsz "cut"
:deu: Metzger "butcher"
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Re: False cognates

Post by Khemehekis »

Here's a pair of false cognates between two conlangs by the same person, but it's complete coincidence!

I just noticed these words borrowed from roots (the way we borrow from Latin and Greek or Japanese borrows from Chinese) in some other language in my Kankonian dictionary spreadsheet file:

protium zipto
deuterium dukhto
tritium klankhto

So apparently some other language in the Lehola Galaxy made zip- its root for one, dukh- is root for two, and klankh- its root for three.

These were words between #33,630 and #33,640, so they would have been created in 2012.

And then, as you can see, Nachtuil invented the word zip for "one" when reverse-diachronizing my Txabao from his Kojikeng for me!:

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7005&p=295167&hilit ... ao#p295167
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 70,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Re: False cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

Japanese -な (an adjectival ending) v.s. Czech/Slovak(and other cognates in other Slavic languages) -ná (feminine form of -ný, an adjectival ending)
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
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Re: False cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

Japanese /ɯ̟ᵝɕi/ "cattle" v.s. Old Norse uxi "ox"
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
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Re: False cognates

Post by Khemehekis »

:isr: לב lev (heart) and :eng: love

Some crackpot sites say the Hebrew "lev" is the etymon of the English "love". The same kind of sites that say "nature" comes from the Egyptian goddess Neter.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 70,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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All4Ɇn
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Re: False cognates

Post by All4Ɇn »

:eng: thou (formerly þou)
:eng: you

Given that thou was formerly written as þou and thus could also look like you (like þe/ye) it's easy to think that you was originally just a spelling pronunciation of þou when þ resembled y.
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Re: False cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

Japanese benjo (便所) “toilet” v.s. Spanish baño “toilet”
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
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Re: False cognates

Post by Xonen »

All4Ɇn wrote: 24 Feb 2021 17:10 :eng: thou (formerly þou)
:eng: you

Given that thou was formerly written as þou and thus could also look like you (like þe/ye) it's easy to think that you was originally just a spelling pronunciation of þou when þ resembled y.
Better yet, it appears that the spelling <you> could in fact be used for either in Middle English.
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