Surprising cognates

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Salmoneus
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Salmoneus »

English: horde
Urdu (and English): Urdu
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qwed117
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by qwed117 »

:hun: Hungarian ezer “thousand” ~ :ind: Tamil āyiram “thousand”~ :eng: English mile

All from PIE *sm-g’éslom “one-thousand”
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k1234567890y
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

English bite and English fibre (borrowed from Latin fibra)

both of them are from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- ("to split")
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
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Shemtov
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Shemtov »

:alb: <dyqan> /dyc͡çan/ "Store" Yiddish /duxann̩/ "to preform the priestly blessings" both ultimately from Aramaic /dukanaʔ/ "Platform"
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k1234567890y
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

English cybernetics(from which the prefix cyber- is derived) and government

both of cybernetics and government are ultimately derived from Ancient Greek κυβερνάω "I steer".

p.s. in modern society the government is sometimes metaphorised as a machine, which kinda is another connection between "government" and "cybernetics".
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
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k1234567890y
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

English orphan and robot

both words are ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃órbʰos “orphan” or its predecessor *h₃erbʰ “to change or evolve status”
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
Iyionaku
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Iyionaku »

k1234567890y wrote: 12 Apr 2021 19:57 English orphan and robot

both words are ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃órbʰos “orphan” or its predecessor *h₃erbʰ “to change or evolve status”
Also, German Arbeit "work" also derives from the same root.
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k1234567890y
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

English Wales, Gaul, Walloon, Wallachia
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
Titus Flavius
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Titus Flavius »

Polish "córka" /tsurka/
Russian "doč'" /dotS/
Salmoneus
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Salmoneus »

k1234567890y wrote: 12 Jun 2021 03:50 English Wales, Gaul, Walloon, Wallachia
Also Cornwall.
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k1234567890y
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by k1234567890y »

Salmoneus wrote: 12 Jun 2021 23:28
k1234567890y wrote: 12 Jun 2021 03:50 English Wales, Gaul, Walloon, Wallachia
Also Cornwall.
yeah you are right
I prefer to not be referred to with masculine pronouns and nouns such as “he/him/his”.
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