Surprising cognates

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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by GoshDiggityDangit »

k1234567890y wrote:
02 Oct 2019 06:18
English clan and English plant
Nah, really?
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Zekoslav
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Zekoslav »

GoshDiggityDangit wrote:
03 Oct 2019 06:24
k1234567890y wrote:
02 Oct 2019 06:18
English clan and English plant
Nah, really?
It's true! Old Irish had no /p/, and before it ended up common enough in loanwords to be borrowed as it is, it was usually borrowed as /k/.
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Shemtov »

:eng: "G-d" "Futile"
Both from PIE *ǵʰew. In Latin it got the meaning "Leaky", and then in Old French "Pointless". In PGrm, it meant "One for whom Libations are poured"
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Xonen
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Xonen »

So, according to Aszev's post in another thread, we have:

:lat: cavāre 'excavate', 'hollow out', 'perforate', 'pierce'
:fin: kaveri 'friend', 'buddy'

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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Aszev »

Xonen wrote:
18 Jan 2020 16:19
So, according to Aszev's post in another thread, we have:

:lat: cavāre 'excavate', 'hollow out', 'perforate', 'pierce'
:fin: kaveri 'friend', 'buddy'
As I understood it, the cognate would be the verb kaveerata, with kaveri being originally unrelated but later affecting the sense of kaveerata, shifting it from 'chat' to 'be friends with'.

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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by vo1dwalk3r »

:eng: worm ~ :ukr: червоний 'red'

Assuming that the PIE roots *kʷŕ̥mis and *wŕ̥mis (both meaning 'worm') are related.

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Pabappa
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Pabappa »

If so, it wouldn't be the only such pair..... wiktionary also lists kʷerb- and werb- both meaning "to turn, bend".
I'll take the theses, and you can have the thoses.

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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Khemehekis »

Pabappa wrote:
04 Feb 2020 07:56
If so, it wouldn't be the only such pair..... wiktionary also lists kʷerb- and werb- both meaning "to turn, bend".
It that where the word "swerve" ultimates from?
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Pabappa »

Khemehekis wrote:
04 Feb 2020 07:57
Pabappa wrote:
04 Feb 2020 07:56
If so, it wouldn't be the only such pair..... wiktionary also lists kʷerb- and werb- both meaning "to turn, bend".
It that where the word "swerve" ultimates from?
Probably, .... I dont see that particular connection made in wiktionary, but wiktionary lists "swipe" and "wipe" as cognates without explanation (note: you have to go back to the PIE to see them unified, as they were separate in proto-Germanic) ... and interestingly enough the PIE root reconstructed there is ksweybʰ-, so perhaps there is a sporadic process of not just s-mobile but also k-mobile, or at least initial /k/-deletion before /w/. 'Tis a puzzlement.
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eldin raigmore
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by eldin raigmore »

Are Quebecois “poutine” and Acadian “boudin” cognates?
(They certainly don’t have the same meaning!)

—————

Somebody thinks they’re also cognate with English “pudding”. Are they?

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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by sangi39 »

eldin raigmore wrote:
09 Feb 2020 07:07
Are Quebecois “poutine” and Acadian “boudin” cognates?
(They certainly don’t have the same meaning!)

—————

Somebody thinks they’re also cognate with English “pudding”. Are they?
Apparently, on all counts, possibly yes.

The origin of poutine is unclear, but it looks like most sources agree it probably comes from French pouding ("any dish formed from putting the leftovers of a place such as a bakery together, and mixing them all into one", with the choice "poutine" relating to the "mess" of the dish), from English pudding, originally a kind of sausage, or any mix of meat in an animals stomach (see "haggis" as the "chieftain o' the pudding-race"), itself from French boudin, with the same or similar meaning (now meaning something along the lines of "black pudding"), which is where Acadian boudin comes from.
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eldin raigmore
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by eldin raigmore »

sangi39 wrote:
09 Feb 2020 17:53
Apparently, on all counts, possibly yes.
Thank you, sangi39!

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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Shemtov »

:eng: "Yak" :zho: 羊 yáng "sheep"
The :zho: is from PST*g-ya(k/ŋ), which meant "domestic animals whose hair can be used for cloth", which also gave rise to old :tib: གཡག /gjak/ "Bull Yak", which in some modern Tibetan languages is pronounced /jak/, which was borrowed into European languages.
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Salmoneus »

English: tambourine, banjo, and mandolin.

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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by alynnidalar »

Isn't tambourine from French tambour, ultimately from Arabic?

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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by qwed117 »

alynnidalar wrote:
29 Mar 2020 18:59
Isn't tambourine from French tambour, ultimately from Arabic?
Sal laid out their theory in this post. I can't find anything for the pandoura <-> tanbur connection, but the connection between pandoura and mandolin is documented
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Pabappa »

English :eng: be
Khmer :khm: ភព /pʰup/ "planet, world"

I am particularly fond of the Khmer word here not because of what it sounds like in English, but because it's a pretty good match for Poswa's pwupp- "planet, moon". But yes, /pʰup/ is a funny word all on its own. There is a Cambodian restaurant called Peephuptmei near where I grew up and Ive considered calling them just to see how they pronounce the name but I dont think Im going to do that.
I'll take the theses, and you can have the thoses.

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qwed117
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by qwed117 »

Pabappa wrote:
04 May 2020 05:05
English :eng: be
Khmer :khm: ភព /pʰup/ "planet, world"

I am particularly fond of the Khmer word here not because of what it sounds like in English, but because it's a pretty good match for Poswa's pwupp- "planet, moon". But yes, /pʰup/ is a funny word all on its own. There is a Cambodian restaurant called Peephuptmei near where I grew up and Ive considered calling them just to see how they pronounce the name but I dont think Im going to do that.
I'd presume /pʰup/ is from Sanskrit bhumi then right?
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Pabappa
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Re: Surprising cognates

Post by Pabappa »

oh, I didnt link to Wiktionary. sorry. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E1%9E%97%E1%9E%96 says its from Pali /bhava/, which comes from Sanskrit https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E0%A4%A ... F#Sanskrit . But bhumi would be still a cognate.
I'll take the theses, and you can have the thoses.

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