The Txabao language

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svld
hieroglyphic
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by svld »

Khemehekis wrote:
11 Oct 2019 05:32
That is a good point . . . I've marveled over the strange evolution of allophony in Japanese myself a number of times. (Also: I really can't stand the Wikipedia article on Japanese phonology: it maintains that /ɕ/ is an allophone of /s/ and /tɕ/ is an allophone of /t/. That can't be -- there are minimal pairs like "suu" (to smoke) and "shuu" (state), or "too" (ten) and "chou" (trillion)!)
"shuu" and "chou" are also written as "syuu" and "tyou". If you look at them in kana, you can see the vowels are not the same: suuスウ tooトオ shuu/syuuシュウ chou/tyouチョウ. There's a glide in the rhyme so they're not really the same.

Things like シゥ and スィ does exit, but unlike てぃ they only appears in proper nouns to my knowledge.

Khemehekis
mayan
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Nachtuil wrote:
17 Oct 2019 19:11
I like the sound of these :)
Thanks1

Declining animal nouns

Animal nouns ending with a single, unaccented vowel

dzipe: spider

Singular
Nominative: dzipe
Accusative: dzipik
Genitive: dzipeu
Dative: dzipou
Vocative: dzipan
Instrumental: dzipem
Oblique: dzipaox

Plural
Nominative: dzipat
Accusative: dzipat'ik
Genitive: dzipat'eu
Dative: dzipat'ou
Vocative: dzipat'an
Instrumental: dzipat'em
Oblique: dzipat'aox

Dual of animal nouns ending with a single, unaccented vowel

'atxru (mate)

Nominative: 'atxrubi
Accusative: 'atxrubi'ik
Genitive: 'atxrubi'eu
Dative: 'atxrubi'ou
Vocative: 'atxrubi'an
Instrumental: 'atxrubi'em
Oblique: 'atxrubi'aox

Animal nouns ending with a consonant

qxet: scorpion

Singular
Nominative: qxet
Accusative: qxet'ik
Genitive: qxet'eu
Dative: qxet'ou
Vocative: qxet'an
Instrumental: qxet'em
Oblique: qxet'aox

Plural
Nominative: qxet'at
Accusative: qxet'at'ik
Genitive: qxet'at'eu
Dative: qxet'at'ou
Vocative: qxet'at'an
Instrumental: qxet'at'em
Oblique: qxet'at'aox

Animal nouns ending with a vowel diphthong

gao: camel

Singular
Nominative: gao
Accusative: gao'ik
Genitive: gao'eu
Dative: gao'ou
Vocative: gao'an
Instrumental: gao'em
Oblique: gao'aox

Plural
Nominative: gao'at
Accusative: gao'at'ik
Genitive: gao'at'eu
Dative: gao'at'ou
Vocative: gao'at'an
Instrumental: gao'at'em
Oblique: gao'at'aox
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Declining body part nouns

Body part nouns ending with a single, unaccented vowel

nebu: nose

Singular
Nominative: nebu
Accusative: nebam
Genitive: nebau
Dative: nebet
Vocative: nebuk
Instrumental: nebaiz
Oblique: nebaz

Plural
Nominative: nebod
Accusative: nebod'am
Genitive: nebod'au
Dative: nebod'et
Vocative: nebod'uk
Instrumental: nebod'aiz
Oblique: nebod'az

Dual of body part nouns ending with a single, unaccented vowel

kru'a (hand)

Nominative: kru'abi
Accusative: kru'abi'am
Genitive: kru'abi'au
Dative: kru'abi'et
Vocative: kru'abi'uk
Instrumental: kru'abi'aiz
Oblique: kru'abi'az

Body part nouns ending with a consonant

zredz: nail

Singular
Nominative: zredz
Accusative: zredz'am
Genitive: zredz'au
Dative: zredz'et
Vocative: zredz'uk
Instrumental: zredz'aiz
Oblique: zredz'az

Plural
Nominative: zredz'od
Accusative: zredz'od'am
Genitive: zredz'od'au
Dative: zredz'od'et
Vocative: zredz'od'uk
Instrumental: zredz'od'aiz
Oblique: zredz'od'az

Dual of body part nouns ending with a consonant

zeud (eye)

Nominative: zeudbi
Accusative: zeudbi'am
Genitive: zeudbi'au
Dative: zeudbi'et
Vocative: zeudbi'uk
Instrumental: zeudbi'aiz
Oblique: zeudbi'az

Body part nouns ending with a vowel diphthong

grau: heart

Singular
Nominative: grau
Accusative: grau'am
Genitive: grau'au
Dative: grau'et
Vocative: grau'uk
Instrumental: grau'aiz
Oblique: grau'az

Plural
Nominative: grau'od
Accusative: grau'od'am
Genitive: grau'od'au
Dative: grau'od'et
Vocative: grau'od'uk
Instrumental: grau'od'aiz
Oblique: grau'od'az

Dual of body part nouns ending with a vowel diphthong

qao (ear)

Nominative: qaobi
Accusative: qaobi'am
Genitive: qaobi'au
Dative: qaobi'et
Vocative: qaobi'uk
Instrumental: qaobi'aiz
Oblique: qaobi'az
Last edited by Khemehekis on 02 Jan 2020 08:55, edited 1 time in total.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Declining inanimate nouns

Inanimate nouns ending with a single, unaccented vowel

gogu: rock, stone

Singular
Nominative: gogu
Accusative: goges
Genitive: gogax
Dative: gogi
Vocative: gogar
Instrumental: gogad
Oblique: gogatx

Plural
Nominative: gogim
Accusative: gogim'es
Genitive: gogim'ax
Dative: gogim'i
Vocative: gogim'ar
Instrumental: gogim'ad
Oblique: gogim'atx

Dual of inanimate nouns ending with a single, unaccented vowel

txakta (sandal)

Nominative: txaktabi
Accusative: txaktabi'es
Genitive: txaktabi'ax
Dative: txaktabi'i
Vocative: txaktabi'ar
Instrumental: txaktabi'ad
Oblique: txaktabi'atx

Inanimate nouns ending with a consonant

hhaz: tree

Singular
Nominative: hhaz
Accusative: hhaz'es
Genitive: hhaz'ax
Dative: hhaz'i
Vocative: hhaz'ar
Instrumental: hhaz'ad
Oblique: hhaz'atx

Plural
Nominative: hhaz'im
Accusative: hhaz'im'es
Genitive: hhaz'im'ax
Dative: hhaz'im'i
Vocative: hhaz'im'ar
Instrumental: hhaz'im'ad
Oblique: hhaz'im'atx

Dual of inanimate nouns ending with a consonant

'ud (shoe)

Nominative: 'udbi
Accusative: 'udbi'es
Genitive: 'udbi'ax
Dative: 'udbi'i
Vocative: 'udbi'ar
Instrumental: 'udbi'ad
Oblique: 'udbi'atx

Inanimate nouns ending with a vowel diphthong

shei: river

Singular
Nominative: shei
Accusative: shei'es
Genitive: shei'ax
Dative: shei'i
Vocative: shei'ar
Instrumental: shei'ad
Oblique: shei'atx

Plural
Nominative: shei'im
Accusative: shei'im'es
Genitive: shei'im'ax
Dative: shei'im'i
Vocative: shei'im'ar
Instrumental: shei'im'ad
Oblique: shei'im'atx

Dual of inanimate nouns ending with a vowel diphthong

thurou (sleeve)

Nominative: thuroubi
Accusative: thuroubi'es
Genitive: thuroubi'ax
Dative: thuroubi'i
Vocative: thuroubi'ar
Instrumental: thuroubi'ad
Oblique: thuroubi'atx
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

When the singular nominative form of a noun ends with a glottal stop, the glottal stop is not geminated when adding suffixes, even if the suffix normally begins with a glottal stop when attaching to consonant endings.

drai': bird (animal gender)

Singular
Nominative: drai'
Accusative: drai'ik
Genitive: drai'eu
Dative: drai'ou
Vocative: drai'an
Instrumental: drai'em
Oblique: drai'aox

Plural
Nominative: drai'at
Accusative: drai'at'ik
Genitive: drai'at'eu
Dative: drai'at'ou
Vocative: drai'at'an
Instrumental: drai'at'em
Oblique: drai'at'aox
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Khemehekis wrote:
17 Oct 2019 07:49
ana: girl, young woman

Singular
Nominative: ana
Accusative: anae
Genitive: anai
Dative: anoi
Vocative: anaq
Instrumental: anax
Oblique: anidz

Plural
Nominative: anae
Accusative: anae'ae
Genitive: anae'ai
Dative: anae'oi
Vocative: anae'aq
Instrumental: anae'ax
Oblique: anae'idz
While I was adding all these words to the Txabao-English dictionary page on our Damta wiki, I realized I had goofed with this one. This word should start with a glottal stop. Don't know how this changes any descendants of this word.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Number in Txabao

Plurals are generally used for something one is speaking of as a generalization:

Crocodile-PL can be dangerous to human-PL.

For something that comes in pairs, use the dual when you mean a pair of something:

The boy squinted his eye-DU.

The warrior put on his boot-DU and mounted his camel.

If you are not referring to only one pair of something, however, use the plural:

Eye-PL come in brown, hazel, green, blue, and grey.

That woman's job is making boot-PL.

Plurals are used if a person/animal/deity does indeed have more than two of something that normally comes in pairs:

Neidu was born with four breast-PL.

A warpion has five eye-PL.

When you are referring to a single item of which a person/animal has more than one, use the singular, but do not use a possessive (neither a genitive nor an "of" oblique) with it. Instead of "There is something in my eye-SG", say, "I iave something in eye-SG". Instead of "A cricket landed on Garthu's shoe-SG", say, "Garthu looked as a cricket landed on shoe-SG".

If which eye, foot, tooth, finger, shoe, etc. you are talking about is specified, a possessive may be used:

The girl raised her left hand-SG.

Mass nouns are treated as singular:

I love oshar-SG. It is warm. (NOT I love oshar-PL. They are warm.)

Foodstuffs are usually singular:

Lamb-SG is a delicious meat-SG.

But can be pluralized if you are talking about more than one kind:

Lamb-SG and goat-SG are delicious meat-PL.

Some foods, such as qe'u, can be either count nouns or mass nouns.

Kinship terms are usually plural:

The woman has four sister-PL.

I have two male_cousin-PL.

However, kinship terms that normally come in pairs take the dual:

Take this child to his parent-DU.

When indicating a mutual relationship, the dual is also used:

The warrior and the vision-guide are brother-DU (since you mean the warrior is the vision-guide's brother and vice versa).

The following pronouns are singular: what, someone/somebody, something, nobody, nothing, another, any, anyone/anybody, anything, none, much, little, enough (with mass nouns).

The following pronouns are dual: both, either, neither.

The following pronouns are plural: everyone/everybody, everything, the rest, each, some, a few, several, all, many, few, enough (with count nouns).

The pronoun "who" can be singular, plural, or possibly even dual depending on the context:

Who-SG ate the last qe'u?

Who-PL came to the oasis and who-PL didn't?

Who-DU are the lucky couple getting married today?

Distributive nouns are plural in Txabao:

The warrior-PL gave their life-PL to fight the Bokisig-PL.

the man-GEN.SG and the woman-GEN.SG tent-SG (the man and woman's tent [they share a tent])

the man GEN-SG and the woman-GEN.SG tent-PL (the man's and woman's tents [they sleep in different tents])



Next up: Pronoyns!
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

First-person pronouns

First person singular: I

Nominative: qi
Accusative: qis
Genitive: qoi
Dative: qet
Vocative: qeu
Instrumental: qain
Oblique: qats

First person plural: we

Nominative: tra
Accusative: tras
Genitive: troi
Dative: tret
Vocative: treu
Instrumental: train
Oblique: trats

First person dual: we two

Nominative: ra
Accusative: ras
Genitive: roi
Dative: ret
Vocative: reu
Instrumental: rain
Oblique: rats

Second-person pronouns

Second person singular: you

Nominative: pi
Accusative: pis
Genitive: poi
Dative: pet
Vocative: peu
Instrumental: pain
Oblique: pats

Second person plural: all of you

Nominative: bra
Accusative: bras
Genitive: broi
Dative: bret
Vocative: breu
Instrumental: brain
Oblique: brats

Second person dual: you two

Nominative: ksa
Accusative: ksas
Genitive: ksoi
Dative: kset
Vocative: kseu
Instrumental: ksain
Oblique: ksats
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
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Posts: 2286
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Third-person pronouns

Third person ethereal singular (She, He, it)

Nominative: mu
Accusative: munun
Genitive: munax
Dative: muno'
Vocative: muneu
Instrumental: munei
Oblique: munib

Third person ethereal plural (they)

Nominative: thap
Accusative: thap'un
Genitive: thap'ax
Dative: thap'o'
Vocative: thap'eu
Instrumental: thap'ei
Oblique: thap'ib

Third person ethereal dual (they two)

Nominative: mubi
Accusative: mubi'un
Genitive: mubi'ax
Dative: mubi'o'
Vocative: mubi'eu
Instrumental: mubi'ei
Oblique: mubi'ib

Third person human singular (she, he, s/he or they)

Nominative: sheb
Accusative: sheb'ak
Genitive: sheb'iq
Dative: sheb'aix
Vocative: sheb'ub
Instrumental: sheb'im
Oblique: sheb'e'

Third person human plural (they)

Nominative: doun
Accusative: doun'ak
Genitive: doun'iq
Dative: doun'aix
Vocative: doun'ub
Instrumental: doun'im
Oblique: doun'e'

Third person human dual (they two)

Nominative: shebbi
Accusative: shebbi'ak
Genitive: shebbi'iq
Dative: shebbi'aix
Vocative: shebbi'ub
Instrumental: shebbi'im
Oblique: shebbi'e'

Third person masculine singular (he)

Nominative: 'in
Accusative: 'in'is
Genitive: 'in'ao
Dative: 'in'aeq
Vocative: 'in'an
Instrumental: 'in'en
Oblique: 'in'ar

Third person masculine plural (they)

Nominative: pser
Accusative: pser'is
Genitive: pser'ao
Dative: pser'aeq
Vocative: pser'an
Instrumental: pser'en
Oblique: pser'ar

Third person masculine plural (they two)

Nominative: 'inbi
Accusative: 'inbi'is
Genitive: 'inbi'ao
Dative: 'inbi'aeq
Vocative: 'inbi'an
Instrumental: 'inbi'en
Oblique: 'inbi'ar

Third person feminine singular (she)

Nominative: raq
Accusative: raq'ae
Genitive: raq'ai
Dative: raq'oi
Vocative: raq'aq
Instrumental: raq'ax
Oblique: raq'idz

Third person feminine plural (they)

Nominative: mao
Accusative: mao'ae
Genitive: mao'ai
Dative: mao'oi
Vocative: mao'aq
Instrumental: mao'ax
Oblique: mao'idz

Third person feminine dual (they two)

Nominative: raqbi
Accusative: raqbi'ae
Genitive: raqbi'ai
Dative: raqbi'oi
Vocative: raqbi'aq
Instrumental: raqbi'ax
Oblique: raqbi'idz

Third person animal singular (it)

Nominative: 'aus
Accusative: 'aus'ik
Genitive: 'aus'eu
Dative: 'aus'ou
Vocative: 'aus'an
Instrumental: 'aus'em
Oblique: 'aus'aox

Third person animal plural (they)

Nominative: boix
Accusative: boix'ik
Genitive: boix'eu
Dative: boix'ou
Vocative: boix'an
Instrumental: boix'em
Oblique: boix'aox

Third person animal dual (they two)

Nominative: 'ausbi
Accusative: 'ausbi'ik
Genitive: 'ausbi'eu
Dative: 'ausbi'ou
Vocative: 'ausbi'an
Instrumental: 'ausbi'em
Oblique: 'ausbi'aox

Third person body part singular (it)

Nominative: zeix
Accusative: zeix'am
Genitive: zeix'au
Dative: zeix'et
Vocative: zeix'uk
Instrumental: zeix'aiz
Oblique: zeix'az

Third person body part plural (they)

Nominative: kseu
Accusative: kseu'am
Genitive: kseu'au
Dative: kseu'et
Vocative: kseu'uk
Instrumental: kseu'aiz
Oblique: kseu'az

Third person body part dual (they two)

Nominative: zeixbi
Accusative: zeixbi'am
Genitive: zeixbi'au
Dative: zeixbi'et
Vocative: zeixbi'uk
Instrumental: zeixbi'aiz
Oblique: zeixbi'az

Third person inanimate singular (it)

Nominative: zho
Accusative: zhes
Genitive: zhax
Dative: zhi
Vocative: zhar
Instrumental: zhad
Oblique: zhatx

Third person inanimate plural (they)

Nominative: to
Accusative: tes
Genitive: tax
Dative: ti
Vocative: tar
Instrumental: tad
Oblique: tatx

Third person inanimate dual (they two)

Nominative: zhobi
Accusative: zhobi'es
Genitive: zhobi'ax
Dative: zhobi'i
Vocative: zhobi'ar
Instrumental: zhobi'ad
Oblique: zhobi'atx
Last edited by Khemehekis on 11 Jan 2020 22:49, edited 1 time in total.
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Khemehekis wrote:
17 Oct 2019 07:49
Female nouns ending with a consonant

'ilaog: woman

Singular
Nominative: 'ilaog
Accusative: 'ilaog'ae
Genitive: 'ilaog'ai
Dative: 'ilaog'oi
Vocative: 'ilaog'aq
Instrumental: 'ilaog'ax
Oblique: 'ilaog'idz

Plural
Nominative: 'ilaog'ae
Accusative: 'ilaog'ae'ae
Genitive: 'ilaog'ae'ai
Dative: 'ilaog'ae'oi
Vocative: 'ilaog'ae'aq
Instrumental: 'ilaog'ae'ax
Oblique: 'ilaog'ae'idz
While I was reading over this, I realized Txabao doesn't have an L. Consider this changed to 'iraog.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

To express the generic pronoun "one", the word zhin (person), which belongs to the human gender, is used:

Nominative: zhin
Accusative: zhin'ak
Genitive: zhin'iq
Dative: zhin'aix
Vocative: zhin'ub
Instrumental: zhin'im
Oblique: zhin'e'

Then there are the correlative pronouns. Before we introduce them, I'd like to create two new Txabao nouns: breu (inanimate gender), meaning "thing", and xa' (body part gender), meaning "body part".

Person words:

taizhin: everyone, everybody
rizhin: someone, somebody, anyone, anybody
nenzhin: no one, nobody, none
baozhin: who

Thing words:

taibreu: everything
ribreu: something, anything
nenbreu: nothing, none
baobreu: what

Body part words:

taixa': everywhere (at every body part)
rixa': somewhere, anywhere (at some/any body part)
nenxa': nowhere (at no body part)
baoxa': where (at what body part)

These are declined like nouns (from their respective genders) in Txabao.
Last edited by Khemehekis on 28 Feb 2020 05:33, edited 1 time in total.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Gender agreement and choosing pronouns


The first and second persons have only one pronoun per number, and do not vary with gender.

Ethereal gender is used for all the gods and goddesses. If one were to say "she" in reference to the camel goddess Neidu, for instance, one would use the pronoun mu.

Masculine human words (man, boy, husband, brother) and feminine human words (woman, girl, wife, sister) always take the pronouns from the masculine or feminine gender. So do boys' names and girls' names, regardless of the gender of the lower-case-letter word from which the name was taken. (So if someone named their son Gogu, which as gogu is an inanimate noun meaning rock/stone, the pronoun for the boy named Gogu would be the third-person masculine singular pronoun 'in, not the third-person inanimate singular pronoun zho.)

When you have an antecedent noun that belongs to the human gender, like traveler or doctor, you will probably use the pronoun from the human gender (almost always in the dual or plural), but if it's in the singular, you have a choice of using an epicene human pronoun (sheb) or a masculine ('in) or feminine (raq) pronoun.

Animal words pretty much all belong to the animal gender, including gender-specific words like "ewe" or "billy-goat". If you are saying, "See that ewe? She is currently using birth to a lamb!", you would use the animal pronoun 'aus, rather than the feminine pronoun raq. If you've given a feminine name to your pet goat or a masculine name to your pet dog, however, then you may use raq or 'in when your pet's name is the antecedent.


Coming up next: adjectives!
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Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Introduction to adjectives

Adjectives come in four types in Txabao.

ONE-ENDING ADJECTIVES take the same peculiar single-vowel ending in the nominative singular, regardless of gender.

SEVEN-ENDING ADJECTIVES can end with one of seven different vowel endings in the nominative singular, depending on gender.

CONSONANT ADJECTIVES end with a consonant in the nominative singular.

DIPHTHONG ADJECTIVES always end with the same consonant diphthong in the nominative singular.

Adjectives agree with nouns in number, gender, and case.

ONE-ENDING ADJECTIVES
'aixa: cold, cool (water)
'aonqe: afraid, scared
brainde: angry, mad
'izdu: left (opposite of right)
maedu: right (opposite of left)
'onqo: slow
shura: beautiful, pretty
sqiki: straight
sraqi: young
tsreizi: shallow
xanza: wet
xisa: soft; easy

SEVEN-ENDING ADJECTIVES
'audu: wide
beindu: lightweight
bobu: round
dandu: hard (opposite of soft); hard, difficult
deudu: heavy
dzrai'u: old (opposite of young)
meusu: narrow
pi'u: small, little
qoe'ru: bad
qshidu: smooth
raebu: dry
shandu: cold, cool (atmospheric)
spazu: thin

CONSONANT ADJECTIVES
gir: long; tall (physical length or height)
grin: new
kshiz: happy
ksoup: ugly
reuq: thick
qob: short (physical length of height)
quk: low
sqouq: rough
thair: hot, warm (water)
txob: big, large
zix: fast

DIPHTHONG ADJECTIVES
geu: sad
kxoi: deep
preu: old
pxei: good
qai: high
zhoi: hot, warm (atmospheric)

COLOR WORDS: Nouns (all ethereal gender)
saog: white
kam: black
braun: red
this: yellow
zeimb: green
neuq: blue
mushur: brown
steis: grey

COLOR WORDS: Adjectives (all seven-ending)
saogu: white
kamu: black
braunu: red
thisu: yellow
zeimbu: green
neuqu: blue
mushuru: brown
steisu: grey

(Could an ancient people realistically have orange, purple, and pink? I know having lots of color terms in one's language is generally reserved for languages spoken by industrialized peoples -- languages like English and French.)




. . . and now I have all the items on the Basic 200 List. Expect one up at the wiki soon.

EDIT: My lexicon is now up to 350 words.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Nachtuil
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

I am sure it could happen. I was hoping to have fewer basic colour terms though maybe through time some can be "downregulated" to other terms. Maybe the colour grey could actually have meant just ashes?
You've been so busy!

Nachtuil
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

I look forward to working with everything though :)

Nachtuil
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

Khemehekis wrote:
25 Sep 2019 06:54
Genitives come before the possessed, although when a preposition equivalent to "of" is used instead of a genitive case, the possessed comes first, then the preposition, then the possessor (in oblique case). An animacy hierarchy determines whether the genitive or the prepositional construction is used. When the possessor is higher than the possessed, a genitive is used; when the possessed in higher than the possessor, a preposition is used.
I'm still looking in your thread, but did you ever determine the preposition used?

Khemehekis
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Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Nachtuil wrote:
18 Apr 2020 02:25
Khemehekis wrote:
25 Sep 2019 06:54
Genitives come before the possessed, although when a preposition equivalent to "of" is used instead of a genitive case, the possessed comes first, then the preposition, then the possessor (in oblique case). An animacy hierarchy determines whether the genitive or the prepositional construction is used. When the possessor is higher than the possessed, a genitive is used; when the possessed in higher than the possessor, a preposition is used.
I'm still looking in your thread, but did you ever determine the preposition used?
I still haven't. So I'll create one now: from now on, the Txabao preposition for of/-'s, when a preposition + oblique and not a genitive is called for, is ta.

While I'm at it, I'm going to create some more basic prepositions:

'u: in, inside
qur: out of, outside
hhem: to, towards
'uhhem: into
qurhhem: out of, out from
ma: on (the surface of)
mahhem: onto
satx: on, on top of, atop
satxhhem: onto (the parrot flew ~ his shoulder)
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2286
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Nachtuil wrote:
17 Apr 2020 19:37
I am sure it could happen. I was hoping to have fewer basic colour terms though maybe through time some can be "downregulated" to other terms. Maybe the colour grey could actually have meant just ashes?
I already have one word for ashes: hhau. Maybe one word can mean the ashes of a cremated person/animal, and another word can mean the ashes of a fire?
You've been so busy!
You know it! But I've been procrastinating on those adjective declensions.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Nachtuil
greek
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Joined: 21 Jul 2016 00:16

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

Khemehekis wrote:
18 Apr 2020 19:54
Nachtuil wrote:
17 Apr 2020 19:37
I am sure it could happen. I was hoping to have fewer basic colour terms though maybe through time some can be "downregulated" to other terms. Maybe the colour grey could actually have meant just ashes?
I already have one word for ashes: hhau. Maybe one word can mean the ashes of a cremated person/animal, and another word can mean the ashes of a fire?
That's a really interesting distinction! Did the Txabao do a lot of cremation instead of burial or entombment? It's okay if you want to keep it for the original Txabao language. Either way I'll try to have some descendant survive of both words into the modern era even if only as a root for a few things. I assume in the modern era basic colour terms would expand again.

Khemehekis
mayan
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Posts: 2286
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Nachtuil wrote:
18 Apr 2020 22:05
Khemehekis wrote:
18 Apr 2020 19:54
I already have one word for ashes: hhau. Maybe one word can mean the ashes of a cremated person/animal, and another word can mean the ashes of a fire?
That's a really interesting distinction! Did the Txabao do a lot of cremation instead of burial or entombment? It's okay if you want to keep it for the original Txabao language. Either way I'll try to have some descendant survive of both words into the modern era even if only as a root for a few things. I assume in the modern era basic colour terms would expand again.
I haven't addressed the question of last rites in the Txabao culture yet, but given that I'm considering that lexical distinction, it would probably be a necessary part of their culture if the language is to make such a distinction, so I'll say yes, the Txabao do cremate the deceased. Maybe I can tie that into the gods and goddesses somehow; does anyone know the reasoning as to why Dharmic religions normally cremate bodies?
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

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