The Txabao language

A forum for all topics related to constructed languages
Nachtuil
greek
greek
Posts: 578
Joined: 21 Jul 2016 00:16

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

Khemehekis wrote:
23 Apr 2020 02:03
I haven't addressed the question of last rites in the Txabao culture yet, but given that I'm considering that lexical distinction, it would probably be a necessary part of their culture if the language is to make such a distinction, so I'll say yes, the Txabao do cremate the deceased. Maybe I can tie that into the gods and goddesses somehow; does anyone know the reasoning as to why Dharmic religions normally cremate bodies?
I've just been reading about it and it is interesting how many traditions used to or still prohibit cremation. It seems like there are a lot of practical reasons to do it but for justification of doing it I have some ideas.
1. Ideas about the soul not being able to pass to the other world if the body is not burnt. As if it would otherwise be trapped. Perhaps, this would make areas with a lot of corpses unnerving or haunted places. Like other people's cemeteries.
2. Ideas that fire is cleansing or purifying. As if something unwelcome or unclean about a dead body, that say, once the soul leaves the body may get occupied by an unclean spirit.
3. A nomadic people may not want to leave their dead behind so causing the body to go up in smoke frees the spirit to travel with them.
4. Ideas about uncleanliness and the ground. Either that corpses make land less healthy or the ground would make the body unclean.
5. Cremation avoids the indignity of decomposition.
6. We could also have an in world creature that commonly digs up carrion and corpses and eats it in the region so cremation avoids that fate easily rather than digging very deep graves.

Khemehekis
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2286
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Nachtuil wrote:
25 Apr 2020 14:28
3. A nomadic people may not want to leave their dead behind so causing the body to go up in smoke frees the spirit to travel with them.
Ooh, I really like this idea! I think I'll use it!
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Nachtuil
greek
greek
Posts: 578
Joined: 21 Jul 2016 00:16

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

I liked that idea most too :)

Khemehekis
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2286
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

https://damta.fandom.com/wiki/Txabao-English_dictionary

For those of you who are concerned by the word for "fur" I just added to Txabao, rest assured that I am decidedly NOT a Trump fan.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Khemehekis
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2286
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Today I added some words about joining and belonging to Txabao.

Using the metaphor of "Carrying is owning" . . .

da'ibra' to carry (in the hand)

Now also means:

to own

dzibra' to belong to (a group) (from dzib, part, piece, segment)

muqdzib (I) member
muqdzibra' to join (become a member of)
muqer (I) wedding
muqra' to join, to unite

From 'oka (sack; bag; sac) and 'okabez (possession (something one owns)):

'okadzib (I) property
'okadzibra' to belong to (be the property of)

I also added several verbs for carrying, which you can find if you use FIND on "carry" on my dictionary webpage.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Nachtuil
greek
greek
Posts: 578
Joined: 21 Jul 2016 00:16

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

Khemehekis wrote:
24 May 2020 02:10
Today I added some words about joining and belonging to Txabao.

Using the metaphor of "Carrying is owning" . . .

da'ibra' to carry (in the hand)

Now also means:

to own

dzibra' to belong to (a group) (from dzib, part, piece, segment)

muqdzib (I) member
muqdzibra' to join (become a member of)
muqer (I) wedding
muqra' to join, to unite

From 'oka (sack; bag; sac) and 'okabez (possession (something one owns)):

'okadzib (I) property
'okadzibra' to belong to (be the property of)

I also added several verbs for carrying, which you can find if you use FIND on "carry" on my dictionary webpage.
I like these a lot. I think they will be gramaticalized even further going into Kojikeng :)

Khemehekis
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2286
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Nachtuil wrote:
24 May 2020 21:48
I like these a lot. I think they will be gramaticalized even further going into Kojikeng :)
Cool! You mean like these words replacing the Txabao genitive case?
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Nachtuil
greek
greek
Posts: 578
Joined: 21 Jul 2016 00:16

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

Khemehekis wrote:
24 May 2020 22:01
Nachtuil wrote:
24 May 2020 21:48
I like these a lot. I think they will be gramaticalized even further going into Kojikeng :)
Cool! You mean like these words replacing the Txabao genitive case?
Potentially! I need to look at it again but I think I construed a construct case already that would be used in situations to for nouns of higher agency being possessed/associated with lower agency nouns. "The Queen of the city" versus "The Queen's city".

They both really could work in a genitive construction. I actually am thinking that maybe the 'being a member of' verb could develop into a copula for at first for saying things like "she's a doctor" and "She's my mother".

Kojikeng's old case system got pretty severely beat up so the opportunity exists. I was thinking to take a bunch of animal body parts (head, face, belly, back, side, foot etc) and develop reduced forms into new adpositions and or adverbs to fill in the gaps. The prepositions would be from the vantage of pastoralists leading, riding or driving four legged animals where the belly would be under, back on top, head for allative/dative senses, tail for back maybe ablative.

The existing Txabao prepositions I wanted to keep in certain verbs and maybe as prepositions in some cases. I especially like the idea of using a preposition as a completive marker around verbs and slowly causing perfective verb forms to develop from them to have a few different derivational verbs in the perfective.

I wanted to talk to you about verb conjugation. I'm not sure if you want to jump at that or want me to throw some stuff down. I want to use whatever your conjugations are (after sound changes) as subjunctive endings and probably get the other indicative conjugations from pronouns merging into the verb where necessary to fortify their meaning.

I have a lot of ideas and not a lot of implementation I fear. :( lol I need to get back to this.

Nachtuil
greek
greek
Posts: 578
Joined: 21 Jul 2016 00:16

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

The body parts idea may be restricted in scope, possibly with some body parts serving as new adverbs with many current adpositions retained. I just need to see how pick up the slack from the previous richer case structure.

Khemehekis
mayan
mayan
Posts: 2286
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 09:36
Location: California über alles

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Khemehekis »

Nachtuil wrote:
25 May 2020 01:57
Khemehekis wrote:
24 May 2020 22:01
Cool! You mean like these words replacing the Txabao genitive case?
Potentially! I need to look at it again but I think I construed a construct case already that would be used in situations to for nouns of higher agency being possessed/associated with lower agency nouns. "The Queen of the city" versus "The Queen's city".
So diachronics that keep the animacy hierarchy alive for at least a little while longer? That could work.
They both really could work in a genitive construction. I actually am thinking that maybe the 'being a member of' verb could develop into a copula for at first for saying things like "she's a doctor" and "She's my mother".
Brilliant!

I'm thinking of giving Txabao a zero copula. The predicate noun or adjective would take the oblique case.

As for "to be" in the locative sense, I'd probably use a verb for "to stand" or "to lie" or "to sit", depending on the position, in Txabao.
Kojikeng's old case system got pretty severely beat up so the opportunity exists. I was thinking to take a bunch of animal body parts (head, face, belly, back, side, foot etc) and develop reduced forms into new adpositions and or adverbs to fill in the gaps. The prepositions would be from the vantage of pastoralists leading, riding or driving four legged animals where the belly would be under, back on top, head for allative/dative senses, tail for back maybe ablative.
Ooh, I like this idea! It fits the culture of the old desert nomads well. I did most of the body parts (albeit for humans) already, since they're such basic words, and since they're etymologically useful for things like prepositions and sometimes number words.
The existing Txabao prepositions I wanted to keep in certain verbs and maybe as prepositions in some cases. I especially like the idea of using a preposition as a completive marker around verbs and slowly causing perfective verb forms to develop from them to have a few different derivational verbs in the perfective.
I'll keep this in mind.
I wanted to talk to you about verb conjugation. I'm not sure if you want to jump at that or want me to throw some stuff down. I want to use whatever your conjugations are (after sound changes) as subjunctive endings and probably get the other indicative conjugations from pronouns merging into the verb where necessary to fortify their meaning.
I've had a lot of thoughts about verbs, but I've been waiting until I get over the hurdle of adjective declension to write about them. I picture all verbs as having one conjugation. If you've been reading my dictionary and Basic 200 List, you've no doubt noticed that verb infinitives in Txabao end in -ra'. Taking off the -ra', you get the root. My plan is to keep that root at the center of the verb, but have a string of prefixes and suffixes that indicate person of subject, gender of subject, number of subject, tense, mood, aspect, voice, and polarity. (Active voice, positive polarity, etc. would be the default and wouldn't take an affix.)
Last edited by Khemehekis on 03 Jun 2020 13:56, edited 1 time in total.
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 66,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!

Nachtuil
greek
greek
Posts: 578
Joined: 21 Jul 2016 00:16

Re: The Txabao language

Post by Nachtuil »

Khemehekis wrote:
26 May 2020 06:46

Potentially! I need to look at it again but I think I construed a construct case already that would be used in situations to for nouns of higher agency being possessed/associated with lower agency nouns. "The Queen of the city" versus "The Queen's city".
So diachronics that keep the animacy hierarchy alive for at least a little while longer? That could work.
[/quote]

I definitely will try to hang onto animacy distinctions for as long as possible honestly haha.

Post Reply