Lexember 2020

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Jackk
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

11m Decembr

naðeu /naˈðaw/ intuitive, easy to understand; naïve, not thought through, basic
< attested in Boral since 10C in Old Boral naðew /naˈðew/, from Latin nātīvus “created, innate, natural"—see also the later reborrowing natif "original, native, unprocessed, raw (material)”. The word had acquired its negative connotations by the Middle Boral period, concurrently with the French naif, from the same source.

Vostrell'heir compren noc meðes y detagl naðeu a histoir.
Your son doesn’t even understand the basic details of history.
/ˌvɔs.treˈlir kɔmˈprɛn nɔk meˈðɛz i deˈtɛjl naˈðaw a hɪsˈtɔjr/
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by brblues »

Lexember 11:

Classical Bokisig (CBKSG)

CBKSG <dosot> /’do.sot / n = tower
Etymology: Early Boksig /do-sot/ (“high*” + “house”)
* Actually just “extending a lot into one direction”, so can also mean “long” or “wide”

Not too exciting an etymology, as no sound changes wreaked havoc on the word, but that’s just the nominative! Let’s look at the other cases.

Code: Select all

+-------------+----------------+---------------------------+
|             |                |                           |
|             | Orthography    | Phonemic pronunciation    |
+-------------+----------------+---------------------------+
|             |                |                           |
| NOM         | dosot          | /’do.sot/                 |
+-------------+----------------+---------------------------+
|             |                |                           |
| ACC         | dzhosot        | /’ʤo.sot/                 |
+-------------+----------------+---------------------------+
|             |                |                           |
| INST/ERG    | dosód          | /do’sod/                  |
+-------------+----------------+---------------------------+
|             |                |                           |
| LOC         | dosotu         | /do’so.tu/                |
+-------------+----------------+---------------------------+
|             |                |                           |
| LAT         | dosodwo        | /do'sod.wo/               |
+-------------+----------------+---------------------------+
|             |                |                           |
| ABL         | dosotwé        | /do.sot'we/               |
+-------------+----------------+---------------------------+
These cases are derived from the Early Bokisig suffixes /du/ (INST), /mɛ/ (LOC), /bo/ (LAT) and /mɛʔu/ (ABL), but the actual forms underwent a fair bit of phonological processes – one thing that is pretty obvious is the regressive voicing assimilation that happened where suffixes had a voiced stop in the onset. The ACC is the odd one out, as it derives from a prefix that in many cases resulted in initial consonant mutation. How this and what might initially look like a tripartite alignment (but kinda isn’t) came about will be the subject of a future entry!
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by brblues »

Dormouse559 wrote: 10 Dec 2020 22:50 10 lexembre - Iluhsa

zèiti [ˈzɛi̯.ti] n - olive (< *zaite)
zeitézza [zei̯ˈtezza] n/adj - olive oil (< *zaite + *-enza "product of")

Ziburórmi zeitišimza?
[zibuˈrormi zei̯tiˈʃimza]
zé-buróm-r zèit-i<šim>ra
INT-eat.PFT-2S.NOM olive-PL.ABS<1S.GEN>

Did you eat my olives?




brblues wrote: 10 Dec 2020 18:39 I forgot to post yesterday, but here's the link to my tweet to show I actually fulfilled my obligations.
Watch out! If you don't perform your Lexember duties, Krampus will carry you away with the other naughty conlangers [:'(]

Just noticed that link also only leads you back to the CBB :D I will correct that, the tweet is here.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 11th
jó2 /ɕoː˥/ n sea
khis1 /kʰis˧/ prep over (indicating tranverse motion above), directly on top of, [+PREP]
kij3-khij3-ang2 /kiɕ˧˩kʰiɕ˧˩aŋ˥/ v to meander, to be undecided (pejorative), to wander (pejorative)
bòy2~ -bòy /bɔj˥/ adj~sf small, little, (used to form affectionate diminutives)*
myang2 /mjaŋ˥/ v to grow a plant, to cultivate
sèi2 /sɛi˥/ n salt not from Latin or French, false cognate. fixed entry


*suffices generally do not have orthographically marked tone

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
km̩s₂- n. redness, sore, sickness, ulcer, wheal, bump

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
θuyʔ˦˨ n 'water buffalo, cow' (Bos taurus (inc. ssp. indicus, taurus, exc. ssp. africanus, namadicus, primigenius)*, Bubalus arnee, Bubalus bubalis) from Proto-Hlai *suyʔ 'water buffalo' cf. Bouhin, Ha Em, East Central Hlai tuy3, Cunhua tθɔyʔ3, Yuanmen tsʰow3.

*Essentially the distribution is the same as English "cattle" and "water buffalo", nothing complex. Just excludes aurochsen.

Sardinian
tacu~taca nm/nf 'plateau, tableland, mesa' No known etymon, probably substratic

is tacus funt coronaus de spérrumas
The mesas/tablelands/plateaus are crowned by cliffs.

sas abbas a básciu terra falant dae sos tacos de Diosa
The waters of Earth fall from the plateaus of the Goddess*

Perhaps a better translation would be "the heights of the Goddess", but that kinda defeats the whole point of the definition. I did kind of always imagine Mount Olympus (the one where the Greek Gods lived, not the one on Mars) to be a large plateau.
Last edited by qwed117 on 26 Dec 2020 03:40, edited 4 times in total.
Spoiler:
My minicity is [http://zyphrazia.myminicity.com/xml]Zyphrazia and [http://novland.myminicity.com/xml]Novland.

Minicity has fallen :(
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by zyma »

Day 11

Gán Vẽi (Entry 11):

/si˥˧/
Classifier:
1. livestock
2. pets
3. (informal) any non-threatening animal, especially a mammal

Etymology
From Old TBD siʔ "livestock, domesticated animals", from Proto-TBD *sit "to live; animal".
Usage notes
Classifiers are most often placed between numerals and nouns. was originally used only to count sheep, cattle, and other kinds of livestock, but is now commonly used to count pets and domesticated animals in general. Colloquially, any medium-sized, non-threatening animal may be counted using .

Example sentence:
Kâi sì rả ye nái phânh hō.
/kaj˦˥˧ si˥˧ ɻa˨˩˨ je˧ naj˩˧ pʰaɲ˦˥˧ ho˥/
[kaj˦˥˧ siː˥˧ ɻaː˨˩˨ ʝeː˧ n̪aj˩˧ p͡ɸãɲ˦˥˧ ɦoː˥]
kâi=sì rả ye nái=phânh=hō
two=livestock.CL sheep PROX 1s.PROG=wool=DIR
I am shearing these two sheep.

Thedish (Entry 11):

fyvel /ˈfʌɪ̯vəl/ (plural fyvels /ˈfʌɪ̯vəls/)
Noun:
1. dandelion, common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)
2. a number of plant species belonging to the genus Taraxacum
3. head of a dandelion
4. a shade of yellow reminiscent of the color of a dandelion flower

Etymology
Borrowed from Old Norse fífill. Compare Icelandic fífill.

yald /ˈjald/ (plural yalden /ˈjaldən/)
Noun:
1. workhorse, draft horse
2. (figurative) a reliable, effective worker
3. (archaic) mare, adult female horse

Alternative forms
yalde, yolden (pl.), yeulden (pl.), yölden (pl.)
Etymology
Borrowed from Old Norse jalda, ultimately from a Uralic language. Compare English yaud, Moksha эльде (elʹde), Erzya эльде (elʹde), Northern Sami áldu.

Example sentence:
De yald hes stopped en ne fyvel roke.
/də ˈjald hɛs ˈstɔpəd ɛn nə ˈfʌɪ̯vəl ˈroːk/
[də ˈjɑɫd̥ həs ˈstɔp̚t‿ə̃n nə ˈfʌɪ̯vəɫ ˈɾoːk̚]
de yald he-s stopp-ed en ne fyvel roke
DEF workhorse have.PRES-PRES stop-PST.PTCP and INDEF dandelion smell.PST.PTCP
The workhorse stopped and smelled a dandelion.

Finally had time today to put examples together for both entries! Hopefully this weekend I'll be able to go back and make some for previous days.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

11 lexembre - Iluhsa

baþi [ˈbaθi] n - sheep (suppletive PL: biznara; < *bautte, *beizənaza)
baþkói [baθˈkoi̯] n - cloud (< baþi + -kói diminutive)
biznara [ˈbiznara] n/adj - herd; livestock (< *beizənaza)


Since this language is supposed to have noun incorporation, might as well test it out:

Tuskabiznaraivóntak libaġusimkubeni.
[tuskabiznarai̯ˈvontak libaŋusi̯mˈkubeni]
tóska-biznara-évónta-k liba-ġósi-m=k-u=beni
herd-sheep.PL-PRS-1S.NOM give-money.PFT-1S-ACC-REL.ABS

I herd sheep for whoever pays me.



Tistéskeþk.
[tiˈsteskeθk]
I was jumping.

[o.O]
Regretting a lot of my life choices right now.


shimobaatar wrote: 11 Dec 2020 04:19weckel /ˈwɛkəl/ (plural weckels /ˈwɛkəls/)
Noun:
1. European pond turtle (Emys orbicularis)
2. fresh-water turtle, terrapin
3. (rare) any member of the order Testudines

Alternative forms
wekel
Etymology
Borrowed from Old French wecle.
Weckel for "turtle" is adorable [:D] I am also thinking about how the Modern French version of wecle would be guècle /gɛkl/, surprisingly similar to "gecko".
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Davush »

12

Hakuan:

psoa /'psoa/ 'air, atmosphere' (OBL: psawe)
psoenuki /psoe'nuki/ 'mist, fog' (psoa 'air' + inuki 'heavy') (OBL: psoenuike)

tsup- 'to pour' (Inflectional stems: tsuik-, tsups-, tsupr-)
kundara /kun'dara/ 'cup'

Tsupsina simua kundahare
/tsu'psina si'mua kunda'hare/
Pour-PST-1sg-3sg water cup-OBL
I poured water into the cup
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by KaiTheHomoSapien »

10th

sórgīn - masc. - valley

A sórgīn (pronounced /'sɔr.çiːn/) is a wide, open valley (cf. Lihmelinyan sárgēn) as opposed to a small or narrow river valley. The "Vale of Arculis" from which the region of Arculy derives its name is natively called the Sórgīn Arkuleís.

11th

álgāti - ā-stem. v. - to snow

Because this is a weather verb, there are no 1st and 2nd person forms, just like titāti - it rains. (This verb has a remnant of the i-reduplication present stem. Arculese has lost the stem distinctions that Lihmelinyan has, so this is archaic and the reduplication is maintained throughout the entire paradigm).

12th

andílā - fem. - rabbit, hare

The word for this animal, an important symbol of the Kingdom of Manter, has similar reflexes in every Mantian language. In Lihmelinyan, the word is masculine, but it's been reanalyzed as a feminine in Arculese. The /d/ is a result of an original unaspirated /t/ in the proto-language.

Should note that in general, Arculese has a much better-defined feminine gender than Lihmelinyan, in which the feminine is marginal and partly derivational.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by spanick »

For Lexember 11th and 12th

pherkhu /pʰeɾkʰu/ (n.) ‘oak (tree)’ from PIE *pérkus

phraka /pʰɾaka/ (n.) ‘pine (tree)’ from PIE * *pr̥kʷéh₂

truma /tɾumɑ/ (n.) ‘forest’ from PIE *drumós

toru /toru/ (n.) ‘tree, wood’ from PIE *dóru

śvaitatoru /ɕʋaitatoru/ (n.) ‘birch (tree)’ from śvaita ‘white’ and toru ‘tree’
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

12m Lexembr
short excerpt from Milda ver Ragner’s 1954 popular history Grex Byd: Kyvarvod y Vaωr Morωn (A Girdled World: The Great Borunesk Meeting), a popular account of the 1517 coming together of people from around the world on the island of Borune [Borneo], and the sequence of events that led up to it.
…this commonly-held misconception. In fact, more than a dozen crewmembers of mac Kellot’s Phœbos had at least some Arabic; the British and Morrack mercantile domains had overlapped in Gaul and Spain for nearly two centuries at this point. At least two were entirely fluent writers, if not speakers—al-Hamid’s book of circular functions was as yet untranslated in Latin and was an invaluable navigational aid.

So it is almost impossible to imagine the height of emotion on al-Kazmi’s Cynthia as, having travelled further west than anyone in quite possibly the history of humanity, arrived at last in Muharram 924 somewhere almost familiar. Following the stories they heard (in Arabic: much of the island had converted to Islam over the previous few decades, with continual trade from Muslim India) of the map-makers from the Far West, they travelled along the coast to the port city of Sinquan.

There at last they united with the Welsh explorers, shouting the immortal line across the bay; O Gastor ‘ila Bolux! “From Castor to Pollux!”, in a reference to the celestial twins of Greek myth. Or at least, mac Kellot’s first mate calls out this line in the 1927 film adaptation One Day in Borune—the thought is pleasing enough that it does no harm to assume the meeting really did start so poetically. Awkwardly, al-Kazmi’s otherwise-impeccable logbook is missing the vital few pages surrounding this date…
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by zyma »

Day 12

Gán Vẽi (Entry 12):

zi /t͡si˧/ (animate)
Noun:
1. any non-domesticated canid, especially one seen as dangerous; wild dog, fox, jackal, wolf
2. a domesticated dog that has returned to the wild; feral dog
3. a domesticated dog that wanders around in settled areas; stray dog
4. rabid dog
5. (informal) cur, mutt, mongrel; a derogatory term for a dog
6. (informal) someone involved with organized crime; gang member, mobster, mafioso
zi /t͡si˧/ (comparative zi ma /t͡si˧ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. lupine, wolfish, vulpine, foxlike; of or pertaining to a non-domesticated canid
2. feral (of dogs)
3. stray (of dogs)
4. rabid, aggressive, violent, dangerous, bad (of dogs)
5. (informal) of or pertaining to organized crime

Etymology
From Old TBD dliʔ "wild dog, wolf", from Proto-TBD *da "bad, evil, dangerous" + *lɯk "wild dog".
Usage notes
Sense 6 of the noun and Sense 5 of the adjective came about due to members of criminal organizations being compared to wolves traveling in packs.

Example sentence:
Zi rả gỏm dou yé.
/t͡si˧ ɻa˨˩˨ ɣom˨˩˨ ɗow˧ je˩˧/
[t͡siː˧ ɻaː˨˩˨ ɣɔ̃m˨˩˨ ɗ̪ɔw˧ ʝeː˩˧]
zi rả gỏm=dou=yé
wolf sheep 3s.HAB=eat=HSY
Wolves eat sheep, they tell me.

Thedish (Entry 12):

reinbow /ˈrɛɪ̯nˌbɔʊ̯/ (plural reinboun /ˈrɛɪ̯nˌbɔʊ̯n/)
Noun:
1. rainbow (meteorological phenomenon)
2. rainbow (design)
3. anything prominently featuring the colors of the rainbow
4. any wide array of colors
5. (informal, dated) a wide variety of anything
6. (poetic) illusion, mirage
7. (poetic) unrealistic or unlikely dream, wish, desire, fantasy, hope
8. (rare) rainbow trout
9. prism, crystal; something that refracts light to create a rainbow

Etymology
From Old Thedish reġnboga, from Proto-Germanic *regnabugô. Compare English rainbow, West Frisian reinbôge, Afrikaans reënboog, German Regenbogen, Swedish regnbåge.

oy /ˈɔɪ̯/ (plural ois /ˈɔɪ̯s/)
Noun:
1. island, especially an inhabited one
2. (archaic) floodplain, alluvial plain
3. (archaic) any area of land by a body of water which experiences periodic flooding

Etymology
From Old Thedish ōi, from Proto-Germanic *awjō. Compare English ey, German Aue, Faroese oyggj.

Example sentence:
Huiday hes wy ne reinbow oer de oy seun!
/hœʏ̯ˈdaɪ̯ hɛs wʌɪ̯ nə ˈrɛɪ̯nˌbɔʊ̯ uːr də ˈɔɪ̯ ˈsøːn/
[høˈdaɪ̯ həs‿wẽ‿n ˈɾɛ̃ɪ̯̃mˌbɔʊ̯ ʔʊɾ d‿ˈɔɪ̯ ˈsø̃ːn]
huiday he-s wy ne reinbow oer de oy seu-n
today have.PRES-PRES 1p.NOM INDEF rainbow over DEF island see.PST.PTCP-PST.PTCP
We saw a rainbow over the island today!

Dormouse559 wrote: 12 Dec 2020 07:31 Weckel for "turtle" is adorable [:D] I am also thinking about how the Modern French version of wecle would be guècle /gɛkl/, surprisingly similar to "gecko".
Thank you, I think so too! Oh wow, I hadn't thought of that, but I quite like it!

Once I have some more time on my hands, I'd like to try to look further into the etymology of wecle, since Wiktionary doesn't indicate where Old French got it from. The initial w- suggests it may have been borrowed from a Germanic language, perhaps.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Shemtov »

Day 10:
Maillys: Éthus "Eagle"

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Aītʿoṭẓ "Eagle"

Day 11:
Maillys: Ferbóll "Wolf"

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Juetlōtl "Jackle"

Day 12:
Maillys: Tyuŕ "Fire"

Momṭẓʿālemeōm: Tʿeōñ "Fire"
Many children make up, or begin to make up, imaginary languages. I have been at it since I could write.
-JRR Tolkien
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 12th
hwòy2 /ẘɔj˥/ n sheep
am2-am2 /am˥am˥/ n bleat
wai3-yang2 /wa˧i˩˥jaŋ˥/ v to ford, to cross [a river]
m /(ə̆)m/ cnj and*
chau4-ang2 /t͡ɕa˥u˧˥aŋ˥/ v to burn (both transitive and intransitive)
guay3 /gʷaj˧˩/ n horn [of an animal]
ham4 /xam˧˩/ n ruler, king fixed entry

(I think, this one of those clitic things; its tone is mostly modulated by the postceding word, as well as its pronunciation)


*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
kn̩h₂- n. sheep, ram, ewe insect, bug, flea already did a sheeple apparently, this is what I deserve for not checking my dictionary

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
(h)hɔʔ n 'cold (respiratory illness)' from Proto-Central Hlai *hŋwəːt 'wind~cold (respiratory illness)' cf.Cunhua hɔt4, Nadouhua ŋɔʔ4, Moyfaw voːk7

Sardinian
barbeghe nf 'sheep' from Latin VERVEX

Custu est logu chi ant pàschidu a berbeghes.
This is the place that was grazed on by sheep.

This post was rather tame (and sheeply) because I only got off a Zoom study call at 11 PM, and sadly, because tomorrow I have my first final of the academic year, I probably won't be able to do a weekly wrap up [:(]

Also just realized that I'm clearly missing some words, starting from Lexember 10th, so I'll have to fix some new entries (labelled 'fixed entries')
Spoiler:
My minicity is [http://zyphrazia.myminicity.com/xml]Zyphrazia and [http://novland.myminicity.com/xml]Novland.

Minicity has fallen :(
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

12 lexembre - Iluhsa

kalli [ˈkalli] n - flower (< kʷarəl)
órži [ˈorʒi] v - drink (< ordʷe)
uržéhalu [urˈʒehalu] v - water, give water to an animal (< órži + -halu, causative)

Contrasting with uržéhalu is watering plants; in that case, one says kad, which debuted on Lexember 9.

Zikadri kallira?
[ziˈkadri ˈkallira]
zé-kad-r kalli-ira
INT-water.PFT-2S.NOM flower-PL

Did you water the flowers?

Ziuržihalur biznara?
[zi̯urʒiˈhalur ˈbiznara]
zé-uržéhalu-r biznara
INT-water.PFT-2S.NOM sheep.PL

Did you water the sheep?


shimobaatar wrote: 13 Dec 2020 04:50Once I have some more time on my hands, I'd like to try to look further into the etymology of wecle, since Wiktionary doesn't indicate where Old French got it from. The initial w- suggests it may have been borrowed from a Germanic language, perhaps.
Let me know if you find anything. Certainly, most Old French forms with initial <w> come from Germanic.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

13m Decembr
trasir /traˈzir/ [tʀɐˈzɪː] (transitive) to cross, traverse, go through; to penetrate, saturate, permeate; (intransitive) to be understood, come across; to die, pass away
< attested in Old Boral as tras(e)ir “to go across, through”; in earlier texts it is still treated as a compound of tras- “across” < Latin trāns- “through, across, beyond” and (e)ir “to go” < Latin eō, īre “I go”. As eir acquires suppletive forms from vādō “I go, walk”, trasir is reanalysed as a regular -ir¹ verb; this process is complete by the Middle Boral period. The intransitive usage is original, though with the transitive senses (it was used with the preposition par “by, through”). We see the newer senses of “permeate” and of “be understood” used from the fourteenth century. In the sense “pass on, die” its use is cyclical; it last returned to common use in the 1920s.

Y bal seyon lançað traseu direct y fenestr.
The ball she threw went straight through the window.
/i ˈbal siˈjɔn lanˈdzaθ traˈzaw diˈrɛkt i feˈnɛs.tr̩/
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by spanick »

Lexember 13

Yemya

vasthu /ʋɑstʰu/ (n.) ‘house’ from PIE *weh₂stu, cf. Tocharian A waṣt ‘house;’ Tocharian B ost ‘house;’ Sanskrit वास्तु ‘house’ (just one definition); Ancient Greek ἄστῠ ‘town’
Last edited by spanick on 14 Dec 2020 05:20, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by brblues »

My last two Lexember entries consist mainly of tables, which are a bit of a pain to render here, so I'm just linking the tweets for yesterday and today.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

This week's categories from the LCV:

FAMILY (Part IV)
Spoiler:
ancestor
descendant
relative
parents
mother*
my mother, Mom, Mommy, Mum, Mama, Ma
father*
my father, Dad, Daddy
spouse, partner, mate
wife
husband
life partner
sibling
sister (older sister of a sister)*
sister (older sister of a brother)*
sister (younger sister of a sister)*
sister (younger sister of a brother)*
brother (older brother of a sister)*
brother (older brother of a brother)*
brother (younger brother of a sister)*
brother (younger brother of a brother)*
child (reciprocal of parent)*
daughter (of a mother)*
daughter (of a father)*
son (of a mother)*
son (of a father)*
aunt (mother’s older sister)
aunt (mother’s younger sister)
aunt (mother’s older brother’s wife)
aunt (mother’s younger brother’s wife)
aunt (father’s older sister)
aunt (father’s younger sister)
aunt (father’s older brother’s wife)
aunt (father’s younger brother’s wife)
uncle (mother’s older brother)
uncle (mother’s younger brother)
uncle (mother’s older sister’s husband)
uncle (mother’s younger sister’s husband)
uncle (father’s older brother)
uncle (father’s younger brother)
uncle (father’s older sister’s husband)
uncle (father’s younger sister’s husband)
niece (sister’s daughter)
niece (spouse’s sister’s daughter)
niece (brother’s daughter)
niece (spouse’s brother’s daughter)
nephew (sister’s son)
nephew (spouse’s sister’s son)
nephew (brother’s son)
nephew (spouse’s brother’s son)
cousin (older daughter of female’s mother’s sister)
cousin (younger daughter of female’s mother’s sister)
cousin (older daughter of female’s mother’s brother)
cousin (younger daughter of female’s mother’s brother)
cousin (older daughter of female’s father’s sister)
cousin (younger daughter of female’s father’s sister)
cousin (older daughter of female’s father’s brother)
cousin (younger daughter of female’s father’s brother)
cousin (older son of female’s mother’s sister)
cousin (younger son of female’s mother’s sister)
cousin (older son of female’s mother’s brother)
cousin (younger son of female’s mother’s brother)
cousin (older son of female’s father’s sister)
cousin (younger son of female’s father’s sister)
cousin (older son of female’s father’s brother)
cousin (younger son of female’s father’s brother)
cousin (older daughter of male’s mother’s sister)
cousin (younger daughter of male’s mother’s sister)
cousin (older daughter of male’s mother’s brother)
cousin (younger daughter of male’s mother’s brother)
cousin (older daughter of male’s father’s sister)
cousin (younger daughter of male’s father’s sister)
cousin (older daughter of male’s father’s brother)
cousin (younger daughter of male’s father’s brother)
cousin (older son of male’s mother’s sister)
cousin (younger son of male’s mother’s sister)
cousin (older son of male’s mother’s brother)
cousin (younger son of male’s mother’s brother)
cousin (older son of male’s father’s sister)
cousin (younger son of male’s father’s sister)
cousin (older son of male’s father’s brother)
cousin (younger son of male’s father’s brother)
grandparent
maternal grandmother
my maternal grandmother, Grandmom, Grandma, Granny
paternal grandmother
my paternal grandmother, Grandmom, Grandma, Granny
maternal grandfather
my maternal grandfather, Grandad, Grampa, Gramps
paternal grandfather
my paternal grandfather, Grandad, Grampa, Gramps
grandchild
granddaughter (daughter’s daughter)
granddaughter (son’s daughter)
grandson (daughter’s son)
grandson (son’s son)
great-
sister-in-law (wife’s older sister)
sister-in-law (wife’s younger sister)
sister-in-law (husband’s older sister)
sister-in-law (husband’s younger sister)
sister-in-law (older brother’s wife)
sister-in-law (younger brother’s wife)
sister-in-law (wife’s older brother’s wife)
sister-in-law (wife’s younger brother’s wife)
sister-in-law (husband’s older brother’s wife)
sister-in-law (husband’s younger brother’s wife)
brother-in-law (wife’s older brother)
brother-in-law (wife’s younger brother)
brother-in-law (husband’s older brother)
brother-in-law (husband’s younger brother)
brother-in-law (older sister’s husband)
brother-in-law (younger sister’s husband)
brother-in-law (wife’s older sister’s husband)
brother-in-law (wife’s younger sister’s husband)
brother-in-law (husband’s older sister’s husband)
brother-in-law (husband’s younger sister’s husband)
mother-in-law (of a daughter-in-law)
mother-in-law (of a son-in-law)
father-in-law (of a daughter-in-law)
father-in-law (of a son-in-law)
daughter-in-law (of a mother-in-law)
daughter-in-law (of a father-in-law)
son-in-law (of a mother-in-law)
son-in-law (of a father-in-law)
stepmother
stepfather
stepsister (older daughter of a sister’s stepparent)
stepsister (older daughter of a brother’s stepparent)
stepsister (older stepdaughter of a sister’s parent)
stepsister (older stepdaughter of a brother’s parent)
stepsister (younger daughter of a sister’s stepparent)
stepsister (younger daughter of a brother’s stepparent)
stepsister (younger stepdaughter of a sister’s parent)
stepsister (younger stepdaughter of a brother’s parent)
stepbrother (older son of a sister’s stepparent)
stepbrother (older son of a brother’s stepparent)
stepbrother (older stepson of a sister’s parent)
stepbrother (older stepson of a brother’s parent)
stepbrother (younger son of a sister’s stepparent)
stepbrother (younger son of a brother’s stepparent)
stepbrother (younger stepson of a sister’s parent)
stepbrother (younger stepson of a brother’s parent)
stepdaughter (of a stepmother)
stepdaughter (of a stepfather)
stepson (of a stepmother)
stepson (of a stepfather)
half-sister (older, of a half-sister, same mother)
half-sister (older, of a half-sister, same father)
half-sister (older, of a half-brother, same mother)
half-sister (older, of a half-brother, same father)
half-sister (younger, of a half-sister, same mother)
half-sister (younger, of a half-sister, same father)
half-sister (younger, of a half-brother, same mother)
half-sister (younger, of a half-brother, same father)
half-brother (older, of a half-sister, same mother)
half-brother (older, of a half-sister, same father)
half-brother (older, of a half-brother, same mother)
half-brother (older, of a half-brother, same father)
half-brother (younger, of a half-sister, same mother)
half-brother (younger, of a half-sister, same father)
half-brother (younger, of a half-brother, same mother)
half-brother (younger, of a half-brother, same father)
widow
widower
orphan
only child
twin
to have (a relative)
direct (~ descendant)
marriage (fact of being married)
marriage (married life: Dan and April’s ~ is going well)
FRIENDSHIP AND ALTRUISM (Part IV)
Spoiler:
company, companionship (being together)
company, companionship (sitting together)
company, companionship (going together)
defense
defensive
protection
relationship
relationship (romantic)
shelter
support
bond (emotional)
comfort (emotional)
care (of child or pet)
care (of elderly person)
care (of sick person)
favor (do me a ~)
help, aid
to help, to aid (succor)
to save, to rescue
to protect
assistance
kiss
to please (make happy)
to please (hard to ~)
to help, to assist
to take care of, to care for
to serve (a patron at a restaurant)
to assure (Joan ~ed Greg that everything would be fine)
to attract (a girlfriend/boyfriend)
to benefit
to benefit from
to encourage, to foster
to honor (they threw a party to ~ Mr. Smirnov)
to honor (the Bible says to ~ your mother and father)
to share (one’s feelings)
to engage (attention, person)
to engage (~ John in a conversation)
to spare (not kill)
to spare (~ her the embarrassment)
to see (nice to ~ you)
to join (May I ~ you?)
to accompany, to come with
to communicate (be in touch)
to stand up for (a person)
to stand up for (one’s rights)
to ease (pain)
to ease (physical tension)
to ease (metaphorical tension)
to ease (one’s conscience)
to ease (one’s mind)
communication (in relationship)
to compromise
helpful (tool, idea)
valuable, precious (jewel or other object)
valuable, precious (advice, time, information)
precious (beloved)
special (very ~ to me)
good (~ friends)
strong (friendship)
weak (friendship)
romantic (~ love, ~ relationship)
faithful, true (not adulterous)
reasonable (understanding: Laura was ~ about it)
benevolent
benevolent (~ dictatorship)
contribution
contribution (of money to charity)
contribution (of goods to charity)
to set aside (~ our differences)
EMOTIONS (Part IV)
Spoiler:
emotion, feeling
mood
good mood
bad mood
temper
boundary
strong (emotion)
weak (emotion)
intense (~ desire)
intense (~ excitement)
intense (~ feeling)
intense (~ friendship)
intense (~ love)
intense (~ hate)
to mean (you ~ a lot to me)
pain (emotional)
pleasure (emotional)
joy, happiness / happy* (about) / happy / to elate / to delight, to thrill
sadness / sad*, unhappy (about) / sad / – / to sadden
fear / afraid* (of), scared (of) / scary / to fear / to frighten, to scare
anger / angry* (with), mad (at) / enraging / to rage / to infuriate
pride / proud (of) / – / to take pride / –
sorrow / sorry (for) / – / to lament / –
regret / sorry (for) / – / to regret / –
grief / grief-stricken (by) / – / to grieve / –
gladness / glad (that) / – / – / to gladden
calmness, tranquility, serenity / calm / calming / to calm down / to calm
tension / nervous, tense (about) / nerve-wracking / – / –
concern / worried, concerned (about) / – / to worry / –
excitement / excited (about) / exciting / – / to excite
interest / interested (in) / interesting / – / to interest
fascination / fascinated (with) / fascinating / – / to fascinate
boredom / bored (with) / boring, dull / – / to bore
surprise / surprised (at) / surprising / – / to surprise
amazement / amazed (at) / amazing, remarkable / – / to amaze
amusement / amused (by) / amusing, funny / – / to amuse
terror, horror / terrified, horrified (by) / terrifying, horrifying / – / to terrify, to horrify
disappointment / disappointed (with) / disappointing / – / to disappoint, to let down
embarrassment / embarrassed (about) / embarrassing / – / to embarrass
depression / depressed (about) / depressive / to brood / to depress
shock / shocked (at) / shocking / – / to shock
astonishment / stunned, astonished (by) / astonishing / – / to stun, to astonish
thrill / thrilled (with) / thrilling / – / to thrill
annoyance / annoyed (with) / annoying / – / to annoy, to bother
envy / jealous, envious (of) / – / to envy / –
confusion / confused (about) / confusing / – / to confuse
disturbance / disturbed (by) / disturbing / – / to disturb, to bother
heartbreak / heartbroken / heartbreaking / – / to break one’s heart
panic / panicky / – / to panic / –
satisfaction / satisfied (with) / satisfying / – / to satisfy
sympathy / sympathetic (to) / – / to sympathize / –
frustration / frustrated (with) / frustrating / – / to frustrate
disgust / disgusted (by) / disgusting, gross / – / to disgust
suspicion / suspicious (of) / suspicious / to suspect / –
shame / ashamed (of) / shameful / – / –
guilt / guilty (about) / guilty / – / –
relief / relieved (about) / relieving / – / to relieve
inspiration / inspired (by) / inspiring / – / to inspire
despair / desperate (for) / – / to despair / –
– / overwhelmed (by) / overwhelming / – / to overwhelm
loneliness / lonely (for) / lonely / – / –
curiosity / curious (about) / curious / to wonder / –
pity / pitiful / pitiful, poor / to pity / –
temptation / tempted (by) / tempting / – / to tempt
gratitude / grateful (for) / ingratiating / – / to ingratiate
– / upset (with) / upsetting / – / to upset
– / sick (of), tired (of) / tiresome / to tire of / –
trauma / traumatized (by) / traumatic / – / to traumatize
FOOD AND DRINK (Part IV)
Spoiler:
food (I need ~ and water)*
food (specific type)
lunch (prepared lunch to bring/take along)
to cook*
to cook, to make, to prepare (meal, breakfast, lunch, dinner)
preparation (of food)
to bake
to bake (potatoes)
to roast (meat)
to roast (beans or nuts)
to fry (lightly)
to deep-fry
to stir-fry
to boil (water, soup)
to boil (rice, meat)
to grill
to freeze (food)
to sprinkle (~ chocolate on the turnovers)
to sprinkle (food with a solid)
to sprinkle (food with a liquid)
to mix, to blend
to stir, to mix (ingredients)
to stir (soup)
to stir (tea)
to mix (a drink)
to rise (of bread)
recipe
to substitute X for Y
to try (a food)
to waste (food)
mix (of ingredients)
mix (ready-to-use)
instant (food)
instant (coffee)
heat (in cooking)
to live on (a food)
organic
cheese
cream
cream (fresh)
meat*
fish
chicken
beef
pork
ham
chop
lamb
sausage
egg (as food)
nut
bread
cereal
cracker
rice (cooked, in Eastern-style meal)
rice (cooked, in Western/non-Asian-style meal)
rice (uncooked)
flour
dough
fruit (as food)*
vegetable
salt (table salt)
spice
sugar
chocolate (substance)
chocolate (piece of chocolate candy)
candy
cake (sponge ~)
cake (with cream)
pie
cookie, biscuit
gum
salad
sandwich
soup
soup (clear)
soup (thick)
sauce
honey
butter
jam
jelly
fat, grease (on meat)
oil (in cooking)
olive oil
drink, beverage
water (as drink or for cooking, cold)*
water (as drink or for cooking, hot)*
milk (from a cow)
milk (from another mammal)
juice (of fruit)
soda, soft drink
coffee
tea
beer
wine
groceries
gas (for cooking)
breakfast
lunch
dinner, supper (evening meal)
dinner, supper (main meal)
dessert
snack (in between meals)
cold (food)
cool (food)
warm (food)
hot (food)
tough
tender
raw
cooked
stale
fresh
stale (of bread)
fresh (of bread)
stale (of cake)
stale (of beer)
ripe
rotten (of food)
to process (food)
MORE FOOD AND DRINK (Part V)
Spoiler:
soy
dairy
yogurt
smoothie
cottage cheese
whey
tapioca
seafood
fish stick
filet
shellfish (invertebrate seafood, collectively)
shellfish (a mollusc)
shellfish (a crustacean)
poultry
nugget
breast
thigh
drumstick
wing
turkey
duck
steak
roast beef
meatloaf
jerky
tripe
bacon (smoked)
bacon (salted)
rib
meatball
bologna
liver
omelette
carbohydrate
granola
graham cracker
toast
gingerbread
pita
bran
pancake
waffle
roll
scone
muffin
crouton
cornbread
oatmeal
crust (of pastry, quiche)
raisin
fruit salad
rind (of fruit)
pickle
sweets
ice
popsicle
shaved ice
frozen yogurt
soft serve
brittle
butterscotch
candy bar
caramel (candy)
cotton candy
licorice/liquorice
marshmallow
peppermint
spice drop
taffy
mint (chocolate)
mint (pastel)
spearmint
pastry (dough)
pastry (tart)
doughnut (with hole)
doughnut (without hole)
wafer
cupcake
cheesecake
turnover
pop tart, toaster pastry
brownie
custard
pudding
gelatin
fast food
French fries
hash browns
hamburger (ground beef patty)
hamburger (as sandwich)
cheeseburger
hot dog
bun
onion ring
snack (snack food)
chip (potato or corn)
pretzel
popcorn
trail mix
submarine sandwich
casserole
dumpling
stew
broth
coleslaw
potato salad
egg salad
tortilla
burrito
enchilada
fajita
quesadilla
taco
tamale
chili
nachos
quiche
biscotti
pizza
pasta
fettuccine
lasagna
macaroni
penne
ravioli
spaghetti
tortellini
bagel
baklava
kebab
cous-cous
curry
chow mein
egg roll, spring roll
pot sticker
ramen
sushi
teriyaki
tofu
condiment
apple sauce
cinnamon
creamer
dip
dressing
frosting, icing
gravy
hummus
ketchup
liverwurst
margarine
mayonnaise
peanut butter
relish
sour cream
syrup
vinegar
vanilla
starch
mineral water
coconut milk
cappuccino
espresso
latte
mocha
iced coffee
decaf
iced tea
herbal (chamomile, etc.)
herbal (blackcurrant, etc.)
hot chocolate
lemonade (still)
lemonade (fizzy)
punch
cider (non-alcoholic)
cooler
root beer
ginger ale
ale
mead
brandy
cider (alcoholic)
liquor
sake
vodka
whiskey
gin
rum
cocktail
tequila
energy drink
cat food
dog food
birdseed
shopping cart
shelf (at store)
check-out
check-out lane
TV dinner
bar (with bins of food)
appetizer (solid food)
appetizer (drink)
AROUND THE HOUSE (Part IV)
Spoiler:
fork
spoon
knife
chopsticks
plate
bowl
bowl (big round dish)
bowl (mixing bowl)
dishes
glass
glass (for wine)
cup
cup (paper)
handle (of a cup)
chair
table
candle
pot (for cooking)
pot (for coffee)
pan, saucepan
frying pan
refrigerator, fridge
stove (for cooking)
stove (for heating)
oven
cupboard
door (of cupboard)
counter
sink (in kitchen)
match
bed
pillow
blanket
alarm clock
brush
comb
soap
soap (for the shower)
bubble (from soap)
towel
toilet
sink (in bathroom)
faucet
drain
razor (non-electric)
razor (electric)
mirror
perfume
make-up
lipstick (substance)
lipstick (applicator)
powder
sofa, couch
clock
painting
portrait
landscape
frame
paint (for wall, etc.)
light
key (for car, computer, etc.)
key (for lock on the door to a building)
lock (on door)
lock (on gate)
needle
string
thread
trap
brick
fence (wooden)
fence (stone)
fence (wire)
ladder
wire (metal)
wire (electric)
lawn
board
MORE OBJECTS AROUND THE HOUSE (Part V)
Spoiler:
tile (on floor)
tile (on walls)
tile (on roof)
carpet
wallpaper
fan (electric)
teapot (for black tea)
teapot (for green tea)
napkin (paper)
napkin (cloth)
placemat
tablecloth
high chair
tray (for food)
microwave
freezer (as compartment of refrigerator)
straw
saucer
spatula
timer
can opener
dishwasher
detergent (for dishes)
cloth (for kitchen)
paper towel
blender
coffee maker
foil (tin/aluminum)
garbage can (in kitchen)
blinds
comforter
sheet (on bed)
mattress
dresser
drawer
poster (for decoration)
nightstand
pillowcase
hamper
incense
lava lamp
cradle
crib
bottle (for baby)
pacifier
bathtub
sponge
shower
showerhead
shower curtain
toilet paper
dispenser
cabinet (storage case)
deodorant
antiperspirant
shaving cream
aftershave
contact lens solution
clippers (for nails)
gel
moisturizer
dye
sunscreen
toothbrush
toothpaste
dental floss
mascara
polish (for nails)
cologne
shampoo
body wash, shower gel
hair conditioner
hairspray
eyeliner
eye shadow
blusher
lotion (cosmetic)
mouthwash
curling iron
hair dryer, blow-dryer
scale (for bathroom)
stuffed animal
teddy bear
piece of furniture
cushion
futon
armchair
curtain
tissue
aquarium, tank
typewriter
wastebasket
burglar alarm
fire alarm
radiator
fireplace
fire, bonfire
rug
bookshelf
vase
sewing machine
vacuum cleaner
plug (connector with pins)
plug (socket)
outlet
cord
lamp
light bulb
switch
washing machine
detergent (for clothes)
dryer
drain cleaner
pot (for plant)
insecticide
fire extinguisher
flashlight
hose
barbecue
sprinkler
sprinkler (in contexts of fire safety)
lawnmower
hammock
mailbox (of a house)
garbage can (outside house)
garage door opener
satellite dish
PARTS OF THE HOUSE (Part IV)
Spoiler:
basement, cellar
bathroom (for bath)
bathroom (for washing hands)
bedroom
ceiling
chimney
closet (for clothes)
closet (for storing bedding)
dining room
door
bell (on a door)
handle (of a door)
floor
floor, story
furniture
garage
gate
hall, hallway, corridor
kitchen
living room
pipe (for gas, water)
porch
roof (on which one can stand)
roof (on which one cannot stand)
room
stairs
thatch (straw)
thatch (reeds)
wall
window
yard
to install (machinery)
to install (computer)
to install (bathroom, kitchen)
to install (wires, pipes)
to install (phone)
to install (washing machine)
MORE PARTS OF THE HOUSE (Part V)
Spoiler:
attic
driveway
office, study
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 87,500 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
zyma
korean
korean
Posts: 10417
Joined: 12 Jul 2013 23:09
Location: UTC-04:00

Re: Lexember 2020

Post by zyma »

Day 13

Gán Vẽi (Entry 13):

lảng /laŋ˨˩˨/ (inanimate or animate)
Noun:
1. house, home, abode, domicile, dwelling, residence
2. (figurative) home, place of comfort
3. household, immediate family
4. birthplace, hometown
lảng /laŋ˨˩˨/ (comparative lang ma /laŋ˧ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. domestic, residential
2. of or pertaining to a house
3. homemade
4. (figurative) comfortable, at home
5. family, familial
6. native, first (of a language)
7. home, original, native (of a town)
lảng /laŋ˨˩˨/ (causative xā lảng /ɕa˥ laŋ˨˩˨/)
Verb:
1. to house, to shelter, to contain
2. to live, to reside, to dwell
3. (informal) to relax, to spend time at home

Etymology
From Old TBD m·leng "shelter, safe house, storehouse", from Proto-TBD *maa "to stay, to stand, to remain" + *hlɛŋ "to close, to shut, to hide, to conceal, to protect".
Usage notes
Noun:
Sense 3 is treated as animate, while Senses 1-2 and 4 are typically inanimate.
Verb:
Senses 2 and 3 are typically reflexive.

Example sentence:
Lảng nâ rĩu góu lĩ hō.
/laŋ˨˩˨ na˦˥˧ ɻiw˧˩ ɣow˩˧ li˧˩ ho˥/
[ɫ̪ɑ̃ŋ˨˩˨ n̪aː˦˥˧ ɻɪw˧˩ ɣɔw˩˧ ð̞iː˧˨ ɦoː˦]
lảng nâ rĩu góu lĩ=hō
house 1s.GEN to mountain COP=DIR
My hometown is by the mountains.

Thedish (Entry 13):

fade /ˈfaːd/ (plural fades /ˈfaːd(ə)s/)
Noun:
1. (dated) paternal aunt, father's sister
2. (rare) aunt, parent's sibling
3. (informal, dated) a woman who is a close friend of one's parent(s)
4. (humorous, affectionate, informal) a young woman who behaves somewhat maternally towards her friends
5. (informal) a form of address for a woman older than oneself but younger than one's parents

Alternative forms
faed, faden (pl.)
Etymology
From Old Thedish faþo, from Proto-Germanic *faþō.
Usage notes
A fair number of Thedish kinship terms, including fade, may be considered "dated"; they are likely to still be understood, although not necessarily used, in their traditional senses by the majority of speakers. However, they remain in fairly active use in certain regions, especially outside of (relatively) large cities. Those belonging to particularly large and/or close-knit families are generally more likely to actively use these terms as well, regardless of where they live. In addition, these terms are frequently used by members of immigrant groups whose native/ancestral languages feature, for instance, separate terms for "paternal aunt" and "maternal aunt". Nevertheless, the majority of speakers default to using more common, less specific kinship terms when conversing with people outside of their families, unless a greater degree of specificity is required. moy /ˈmɔɪ̯/ is the traditional generic term for "aunt (paternal or maternal)", but speakers may use ant /ˈant/ - or variants like tant /ˈtant/ and nant /ˈnant/ - instead. The coordinate term for "maternal aunt" is medry /ˈmɛdrʌɪ̯/.

oom /ˈoːm/ (plural omes /ˈoːm(ə)s/)
Noun:
1. (dated) maternal uncle, mother's brother
2. (rare) uncle, parent's sibling
3. (informal, dated) a man who is a close friend of one's parent(s)
4. (humorous, affectionate, informal) a young man who behaves somewhat paternally towards his friends
5. (informal) a form of address for a man older than oneself but younger than one's parents

Alternative forms
ome, oomes (pl.)
Etymology
From Old Thedish ōam, from Proto-Germanic *awahaimaz. Compare Scots eme, Saterland Frisian Oom, Dutch oom, German Oheim.
Usage notes
The notes regarding the usage of fade above largely apply to oom as well. The coordinate term for "paternal uncle" is either feder /ˈfeːdər/, fedder /ˈfɛdər/, or fedren /ˈfɛdrən/. The most common generic term for "uncle (paternal or maternal)" is onkel /ˈɔŋkəl/, variants of which include nonkel /ˈnɔŋkəl/ and tonkel /ˈtɔŋkəl/.

Example sentence:
Myn fade en myn oom hes huyed. Det is neut dweurgh, yea?
/mʌɪ̯n ˈfaːd ɛn mʌɪ̯n ˈoːm hɛs ˈhœʏ̯əd || dɛt ɪs nœt ˈdwœrx | jɛː/
[mẽɱ ˈfaːd‿ə̃m mẽn‿ˈõːm həs ˈhœʏ̯d || dət‿s nət̚ ˈdwœɾχ | ˈjɛː]
myn fade en myn oom he-s huy-ed || det is-Ø neut dweurgh, yea
1s.GEN paternal_aunt and 1s.GEN maternal_uncle have.PRES-PRES marry-PST.PTCP || that be.PRES-PRES NEG weird, yes
My dad's sister and my mom's brother got married. That's not weird, right?

shimobaatar wrote: 12 Dec 2020 03:25 Hopefully this weekend I'll be able to go back and make some for previous days.
(Referring to example sentences.)

Well, that didn't happen. This coming week is the last week of the semester for me, so hopefully next weekend I'll have more free time.
Edit: Examples added on December 19th, 2020.

Dormouse559 wrote: 13 Dec 2020 07:59
shimobaatar wrote: 13 Dec 2020 04:50Once I have some more time on my hands, I'd like to try to look further into the etymology of wecle, since Wiktionary doesn't indicate where Old French got it from. The initial w- suggests it may have been borrowed from a Germanic language, perhaps.
Let me know if you find anything. Certainly, most Old French forms with initial <w> come from Germanic.
Will do! [tick]
Last edited by zyma on 20 Dec 2020 00:11, edited 1 time in total.
The user formerly known as "shimobaatar".
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qwed117
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Weekly Wrap Up
Like Week 1, I'm just gonna give some appreciative comments to everyone who participated in Week 2 (by order of first participation). I'm a bit strapped for time because I had a test earlier today, so I apologize if I missed someone or if my comments seem a bit rushed.

shimobaatar:
Spoiler:
shimobaatar wrote: 12 Dec 2020 03:25 Day 11

Gán Vẽi (Entry 11):

/si˥˧/
Classifier:
1. livestock
2. pets
3. (informal) any non-threatening animal, especially a mammal

Etymology
From Old TBD siʔ "livestock, domesticated animals", from Proto-TBD *sit "to live; animal".
Usage notes
Classifiers are most often placed between numerals and nouns. was originally used only to count sheep, cattle, and other kinds of livestock, but is now commonly used to count pets and domesticated animals in general. Colloquially, any medium-sized, non-threatening animal may be counted using .

Example sentence:
Kâi sì rả ye nái phânh hō.
/kaj˦˥˧ si˥˧ ɻa˨˩˨ je˧ naj˩˧ pʰaɲ˦˥˧ ho˥/
[kaj˦˥˧ siː˥˧ ɻaː˨˩˨ ʝeː˧ n̪aj˩˧ p͡ɸãɲ˦˥˧ ɦoː˥]
kâi=sì rả ye nái=phânh=hō
two=livestock.CL sheep PROX 1s.PROG=wool=DIR
I am shearing these two sheep.
First I gotta say, it really cool that you're juggling both Thedish and Gan Vei. Second, I was reading this and realized that I had completely forgotten about classifiers in the Hlai-like A Priori, and the Hlai-lang A Posteriori. It's cool that you're really making this language work together. It feels authentic, and "real".
Shemtov:
Spoiler:
Shemtov wrote: 09 Dec 2020 06:34 Day 8:
Maillys: Cuhyuthyĺ-Ćá "Chewing Tea"- a form of tea similiar to IRL White Tea, but meant to be chewed, taken at tea-chewing breaks, and when boiling is impractical. Cuhyuthyl was originally tobacco, which was exclusively chewed, with tea drunk at meals, but when it was realized that tea could be prepared as a chew, the Maill slowly phased out tobacco so they could rely on their tea crop, and not have to plant tobacco.
Interesting etymology for the Maillys word, It's very interesting that the Maill transitioned form tobacco usage to tea usage.
Iyionaku:
Spoiler:
Iyionaku wrote: 07 Dec 2020 11:26 Lexember 6th and 7th - Yélian

yitármiku [ɕɨˈtaɾmikʉ] - celery, fennel
Etymology: from yitár "star" + miku "leek", literally "star leek"

USAGE NOTES: Note that Yélian uses the same word for celery and fennel, as both plants weren't native to Yélians. If you need to differentiate, you'd propably call the latter yitármikuzali "sweet star leek"
This is really cool, and the literal name "star leek" reminds me of English's "star anise" and similar weird naming of plants.
KaiTheHomoSapien:
Spoiler:
KaiTheHomoSapien wrote: 12 Dec 2020 18:07 10th

sórgīn - masc. - valley

A sórgīn (pronounced /'sɔr.çiːn/) is a wide, open valley (cf. Lihmelinyan sárgēn) as opposed to a small or narrow river valley. The "Vale of Arculis" from which the region of Arculy derives its name is natively called the Sórgīn Arkuleís.

11th

álgāti - ā-stem. v. - to snow

Because this is a weather verb, there are no 1st and 2nd person forms, just like titāti - it rains. (This verb has a remnant of the i-reduplication present stem. Arculese has lost the stem distinctions that Lihmelinyan has, so this is archaic and the reduplication is maintained throughout the entire paradigm).

12th

andílā - fem. - rabbit, hare

The word for this animal, an important symbol of the Kingdom of Manter, has similar reflexes in every Mantian language. In Lihmelinyan, the word is masculine, but it's been reanalyzed as a feminine in Arculese. The /d/ is a result of an original unaspirated /t/ in the proto-language.

Should note that in general, Arculese has a much better-defined feminine gender than Lihmelinyan, in which the feminine is marginal and partly derivational.
I really like the appearance of all these words, especially andílā. I also love hearing about how you're developing Arculese, the different reduplication stems, the -nth suffix, and the feminine gender.
Dormouse559:
Spoiler:
Dormouse559 wrote: 10 Dec 2020 22:50 10 lexembre - Iluhsa

zèiti [ˈzɛi̯.ti] n - olive (< *zaite)
zeitézza [zei̯ˈtezza] n/adj - olive oil (< *zaite + *-enza "product of")

Ziburórmi zeitišimza?
[zibuˈrormi zei̯tiˈʃimza]
zé-buróm-r zèit-i<šim>ra
INT-eat.PFT-2S.NOM olive-PL.ABS<1S.GEN>

Did you eat my olives?
I love the word zèite. It reminds me of learning the word 'aceite' in Spanish class when talking about food items. Like 'aceite de oliva', olive oil (which came up surprisingly often).
silvercat:
Spoiler:
silvercat wrote: 08 Dec 2020 05:44 Catching up

Here are some of the inflecting verbs in Tynthna

4 tuthav - have / hold
5 charuv - feel (with hands, skin, etc)
6 tarov - grow, get larger, expand
7 tramuv - walk, crawl
I really like the aesthetic of this language, and the words. I can't wait to see more of Tyntha this month, and hopefully at other times.
Jackk:
Spoiler:
Jackk wrote: 13 Dec 2020 00:44 12m Lexembr
short excerpt from Milda ver Ragner’s 1954 popular history Grex Byd: Kyvarvod y Vaωr Morωn (A Girdled World: The Great Borunesk Meeting), a popular account of the 1517 coming together of people from around the world on the island of Borune [Borneo], and the sequence of events that led up to it.
…this commonly-held misconception. In fact, more than a dozen crewmembers of mac Kellot’s Phœbos had at least some Arabic; the British and Morrack mercantile domains had overlapped in Gaul and Spain for nearly two centuries at this point. At least two were entirely fluent writers, if not speakers—al-Hamid’s book of circular functions was as yet untranslated in Latin and was an invaluable navigational aid.

So it is almost impossible to imagine the height of emotion on al-Kazmi’s Cynthia as, having travelled further west than anyone in quite possibly the history of humanity, arrived at last in Muharram 924 somewhere almost familiar. Following the stories they heard (in Arabic: much of the island had converted to Islam over the previous few decades, with continual trade from Muslim India) of the map-makers from the Far West, they travelled along the coast to the port city of Sinquan.

There at last they united with the Welsh explorers, shouting the immortal line across the bay; O Gastor ‘ila Bolux! “From Castor to Pollux!”, in a reference to the celestial twins of Greek myth. Or at least, mac Kellot’s first mate calls out this line in the 1927 film adaptation One Day in Borune—the thought is pleasing enough that it does no harm to assume the meeting really did start so poetically. Awkwardly, al-Kazmi’s otherwise-impeccable logbook is missing the vital few pages surrounding this date…
There's always a lot to love about Boral, but I really enjoy reading the Boralverse snippets and stories. They're really cool and interesting to think about.
brblues:
Spoiler:
brblues wrote: 11 Dec 2020 19:25 Lexember 11:

Classical Bokisig (CBKSG)

CBKSG <dosot> /’do.sot / n = tower
Etymology: Early Boksig /do-sot/ (“high*” + “house”)
* Actually just “extending a lot into one direction”, so can also mean “long” or “wide”

Not too exciting an etymology, as no sound changes wreaked havoc on the word, but that’s just the nominative! Let’s look at the other cases.

[...]

These cases are derived from the Early Bokisig suffixes /du/ (INST), /mɛ/ (LOC), /bo/ (LAT) and /mɛʔu/ (ABL), but the actual forms underwent a fair bit of phonological processes – one thing that is pretty obvious is the regressive voicing assimilation that happened where suffixes had a voiced stop in the onset. The ACC is the odd one out, as it derives from a prefix that in many cases resulted in initial consonant mutation. How this and what might initially look like a tripartite alignment (but kinda isn’t) came about will be the subject of a future entry!
It's really cool that your doing diachronic work with Boksig, and I really love seeing the interesting forms that dosot takes. That initial consonant mutation!
kiwikami:
Spoiler:
kiwikami wrote: 09 Dec 2020 04:23 Oof, I've fallen quite a bit behind. Time to catch up! Day 8 below, days 1-7 in spoiler:

Day 8 (Alál)

kıḳaḷı /ˈkɛŋəd͡ɮɪ/
'island chain'
AGT kıḳıḷ | PAT kıḳıúḷ
Declension class I2 | Handling class saŕ
From KIḶ2 'island' and -ḳ- 'homogeneous group'.

Ṭıtkàa kıḳıúḷ hrıulìr.
bite<3.3> island.chain<PAT> blizzard<AGT>
The blizzard struck the island chain.
I really like the appearance of Alál, and the appearance of the word kıḳaḷı. It's also interesting to see the classes and dictionary forms that go into the word.
spanick:
Spoiler:
spanick wrote: 10 Dec 2020 05:01 Fell waaaay behind so here’s a bunch of entries form Yemya to catch up.

śaus /ɕaus/ (n.) ‘ear’ from PIE *h₂ṓws; like ‘eye’ there remains a fossilized dual form śuśa.

śtonth /ɕtontʰ/ (n.) ‘tooth’ from PIE *h₃dónts.

jostha /ʝostʰɑ/ (n.) ‘hand’ from PIE *ǵʰóstos.

śvaithatoru /ɕʋaitʰɑtoru/ (n.) ‘poplar tree’ from PIE *ḱweytós ‘white’ plus *dóru ‘tree’.
I really really like these four words. I would never have thought 'śvaithatoru' would be cognate to English "white tree', given just the word and the definition. It really goes to show how interesting of a character Yemya has taken on.
Davush:
Spoiler:
Davush wrote: 10 Dec 2020 14:44 10th
Trookuk nindahare
play.music-PROG-2sg lute-ADV
'You are playing the lute / You are playing music on the lute'

Takahrin puambe siare
hir-IRR-1sg drum-ADV day-ADV
'I will play the drums during the day'
I really like the appearance of these sentences, they really show how cool Hakuan is.

Lexember 13th
lèuh1 /lɛux˧/ n sourness, acerbity, causticity* (I think food will typically be described as 'having' a taste in this language)

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
ter-o v. eat Kinda embarrassed I don't already have such a basic word in the dictionary... I think

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
tsɛmʔ˦˨ v 'pinch' from Proto-Hlai *tɕeːmʔ, cf. Bouhin, Ha Em, Lauhut, Moyfaw tseːm Nadouhua sɛːʔ4, Yuanmen tem3

Sardinian
petza nf 'meat' from Latin PETTIA, with Gaulish origin, cognate to Irish cuid 'part, portion', Albanian pjesë 'part, particle', and English piece

su matzone bi podet fàghere peta in s'annile
The fox there can make meat in the lamb-pen
Spoiler:
My minicity is [http://zyphrazia.myminicity.com/xml]Zyphrazia and [http://novland.myminicity.com/xml]Novland.

Minicity has fallen :(
The SqwedgePad
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