Lexember 2020

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shimobaatar
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 16

Gán Vẽi (Entry 16):

phéi /pʰej˩˧/ (inanimate)
Noun:
1. door
2. doorway, entrance
3. gate
4. (rare) window
5. hatch, flap, lid, covering
6. opening, hole (in a jar or box)
7. port, harbor
8. (figurative) opportunity, chance
9. prologue, beginning, start, opening (of a story)
10. (figurative) gateway, stepping stone
phéi /pʰej˩˧/ (comparative phéi ma /pʰej˩˧ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. of or pertaining to doors, gates, entrances
2. of or pertaining to lids, hatches, openings
3. of or pertaining to ports, harbors
4. (figurative) opportune, fortuitous, convenient, lucky
5. opening, early, beginning, starting, initial (of a part of a story)
6. (figurative) intermediary
phéi /pʰej˩˧/ (causative xā phéi /ɕa˥ pʰej˩˧/)
Verb:
1. to enter, to cross a threshold
2. to arrive
3. to open, to uncover
4. to dock (of a ship)

Etymology
From Old TBD prêêh "to cross, to traverse, to enter, to exit", from Proto-TBD *pɯs "hole, hollow, opening, gap" + *rees "to leave, to depart, to disappear, to die".

Example sentence:
Phéi mãu lảng vó gỏu lāng gá.
/pʰej˩˧ maw˧˩ laŋ˨˩˨ vo˩˧ ɣow˨˩˨ laŋ˥ ɣa˩˧/
[p͡ɸɛj˩˧ mɑw˧˩ ɫ̪ɑ̃ŋ˨˩˨ ʋoː˩˧ ɣɔw˨˩˧ ɫ̪ɑ̃ŋ˦ ɣaː˨˧]
phéi mãu lảng vó gỏu=lāng=gá
door at house 1p.GEN 3s=close=INFER
She's closed our front door, I assume.

Thedish (Entry 16):

eutel /ˈøːtəl/ (plural eutels /ˈøːtəls/)
Noun:
1. glutton, overeater, gourmand
2. (informal) gourmand, foodie
3. wolverine (Gulo gulo)
eutel /ˈøːtəl/
Adjective:
1. gluttonous
2. greedy
3. (informal) food-loving
4. of or pertaining to wolverines

Etymology
From Old Thedish eotol, from Proto-Germanic *etulaz.

meulk /ˈmœlk/ (plural meulks /ˈmœlks/)
Noun:
1. cow's milk
2. milk from any mammal
3. non-dairy milk substitute obtained from soy beans, almonds, coconuts, etc.
4. serving or portion of milk
5. (rare) dairy product

Alternative forms
melk, milk, mulk, molk, miolk, mölk
Etymology
From Old Thedish meoloc, from Proto-Germanic *meluks. Compare North Frisian molke, Plautdietsch Malkj, Dutch melk, Mòcheno milch, Luxembourgish Mëllech, Faroese mjólk, Westrobothnian mjólk.
Usage notes
As is expected for nouns referring to liquids, meulk is typically uncountable. However, Senses 4-5 are often countable, and any sense of the word may be countable when different kinds of milk are being discussed.

Example sentence:
Can eutels soy meulk drink?
/kan ˈøːtəls ˈsɔɪ̯ ˈmœlk ˈdrɪŋk/
[kə̃n‿ˈøːtəɫs ˈsɔɪ̯ ˈmœɫk̚ ˈdɾɪ̃ŋk̚]
can-Ø eutel-s soy meulk drink-Ø
can.PRES-PRES glutton-PL soy milk drink.PRES-S.INF
Can wolverines drink soy milk?

Edit: Examples added on December 19th, 2020.
Last edited by shimobaatar on 20 Dec 2020 00:24, edited 1 time in total.
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Davush
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Davush »

16

sunha 'dog' (OBL: suanhe)

pik- 'to sting, scratch' (IMP: pii- PST: piks- IRR: pikr-)
pingipi 'mosquito' (possibly onomatopoeic with influence from pik-) (OBL: pingiipe)

Pikrauk pingipi omuitse /piˈkrauk piŋˈgipi omuˈitse/
sting-IRR-3sg-2sg mosquito river-OBL
'Mosquitoes will sting you at the river'
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Jackk
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

16m Lexember
graçar /graˈdzar/ [gʀɐˈdzɑː] to show mercy, pity, let off
also graçant /graˈdzant/ merciful, compassionate, charitable
< verb from the late Old Boral period graçar “to show mercy, to be kind”, derived from (and still synchronically a simple derivation of) graç “kindness > favour”, which comes from Latin grātia “thankfulness, grace”. The adjective is an obvious step to make, but is not evidenced in text until well into the fourteenth century, in Heudar Fiðaut’s Catreðuejnt Lagrem (Twenty-four Laments).

Ig degnant, il graçaurn y domn ant braç coupað apart.
Nonetheless, they pitied the woman whose arm was cut off.
/aj dijˈnant | ɪl graˈdzo.rn̩ i ˈdo.m̩ ant ˈbrats kuˈpaθ aˈpart/
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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spanick
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by spanick »

Lexember 16

Yemya

I decided to do kinship terms today and I kinda went all out. I've opted not to include etymologies right now, though I may add them in later in a spoiler. Yemya has lost a lot of IE features like declension and conjugation. But I decided that kinship terms is one of the ways it's most conservative, becasue kinship and extended family is a particularly important feature of Yemya culture. This should reflect a sort of modified (I think) Omaha kinship system. I also still need to include words cross cousin more terms for in-laws.

dukathar /dukɑtʰɑr/ (n.) ‘daughter, niece (same sex sibling's daughter)’
brathar /bɾɑtʰɑr/ (n.) ‘brother, parallel male-cousin’
suyu /suju/ (n.) ‘son, nephew (same sex sibling's son)’
svasar /sʋɑsɑr/ ‘sister, parallel female-cousin’
matar /mɑtɑr/ (n.) ‘mother’
phatar /pʰɑtɑr/ (n.) ‘father’
jenathor /ʝenɑtʰor/ (n.) parent
jalau /ʝɑlau/ (n.) ‘brother’s wife, sister in law’
janathar /ʝɑnɑtʰɑr/ (n.) ‘co-sister-in-law, brother-in-law’s wife’
nephat /nepʰɑt/ (n.) ‘nephew (opposite sex sibling's son), grandson’
nettśa /net͡ɕt͡ɕɑ/ (n.) ‘niece (opposite sex sibling's daughter), granddaughter’
śauśa /ɕauɕɑ/ (n.) ‘grandfather’
śauśya /ɕauɕjɑ/ (n.) ‘grandmother’
phatrauya /pʰɑtɾaujɑ/ (n.) ‘paternal uncle’
matra /mɑtɾɑ/ (n.) ‘maternal aunt’
jmathar /ʝmɑtʰɑr/ ‘brother-in-law’
vadu /ʋɑdu/ (n.) ‘bride, daughter-in-law’
Last edited by spanick on 17 Dec 2020 17:34, edited 4 times in total.
Khemehekis
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

Love the kinship system, but . . .
spanick wrote: 16 Dec 2020 17:54 nettśa /net͡ɕt͡ɕɑ/ (n.) ‘niece (sister’s daughter), grandson’
You mean granddaughter, right?
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 77,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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spanick
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by spanick »

Khemehekis wrote: 16 Dec 2020 17:56 Love the kinship system, but . . .
spanick wrote: 16 Dec 2020 17:54 nettśa /net͡ɕt͡ɕɑ/ (n.) ‘niece (sister’s daughter), grandson’
You mean granddaughter, right?
Yes, thank you. Corrected (along with a couple other mistakes).
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qwed117
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 16th
tau1 /tau˧/ adj happy
për4 /pɤɻ˩˥/ n mother
sa3-dang2 /sa˧˩daŋ˥/ v to enjoy [of an activity]
thák2 /tʰaːk˥/ n water pitcher*

*Inspired by Vietnamese thác 'waterfall'

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
kart-u n brother

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
ɓayʔ˩˨ n 'hen' from Proto- Hlai *hmiːʔ 'hen', cf. Cunhua ɓayʔ4, Ha Em, Bouhinmey3

Sardinian
frissu adj 'fried' from Latin FRIXUS, from Latin FRIGEO 'I roast, I fry, I parch', cf. Romanian fript, Italian fritto from Latin FRICTUS*

*Sardinian is the only Romance language I can find that has a descendant of FRIXUS!
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

The SqwedgePad
Khemehekis
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Khemehekis »

spanick wrote: 16 Dec 2020 17:57
Khemehekis wrote: 16 Dec 2020 17:56 Love the kinship system, but . . .
spanick wrote: 16 Dec 2020 17:54 nettśa /net͡ɕt͡ɕɑ/ (n.) ‘niece (sister’s daughter), grandson’
You mean granddaughter, right?
Yes, thank you. Corrected (along with a couple other mistakes).
You're welcome. And I see you added some cousin terms.

What do you call nieces and nephews who are your spouse's sibling's children?
♂♥♂♀

Squirrels chase koi . . . chase squirrels

My Kankonian-English dictionary: 77,000 words and counting

31,416: The number of the conlanging beast!
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Dormouse559
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

16 lexembre - Iluhsa

I spent today breaking my brain over the passive voice in a language whose nouns somewhat recently developed ergative case marking while the rest of the language stayed nominative-accusative. Here's what I wrote:

The passive voice is communicated in one of two ways: by adding the suffix -(u)xa or by deleting the ergative subject of a verb. The -(u)xa strategy is mainly used when the patient of the verb is pronominal or when the goal is to form an impersonal construction. These limited uses have to do with the changing grammar of the language. When the language's nouns became morphologically ergative, they lost the accusative case, preventing them from being targeted by the passive voice; pronouns were the only accusative forms that remained. Meanwhile, the passive was also used on intransitive verbs as an impersonal construction, which has survived into the modern language.

Bórum gindamu.
[ˈborum ˈgindamu]
bórum ginid-a=m-u.
eat.PFT woman-ERG=3S-ACC

The woman ate it.

Buzmuxam.
[buzˈmuxam]
burum-(u)xa-m
eat.PFT-PAS-3S.NOM

It was eaten.

Bumdašin šeišiniataxa.
[bumˈdaʃin ʃei̯ʃiˈni̯ataxa]
bómd<ak>i-en šéi~šéiniata-(u)xa
room<LOC>-DEM PRS~nap-PAS

This room is for napping. (roughly "In this room it is napped.")

When the direct object is nominal, a passive meaning is communicated by not stating a subject. Whether a single-argument construction is an active intransitive or a passive transitive depends on the transitivity of the verb. Transitivity is treated strictly in the language, but it is often unmarked, in which case it must be learned with the verb.

Bórum ginda zèiti.
[ˈborum ˈginda ˈzɛi̯ti]
bórum ginid-a zèiti
eat.PFT woman-ERG olive.ABS

The woman ate the olive.

Bórum zèiti.
[ˈborum ˈzɛi̯ti]
bórum zèiti
eat.PFT olive.ABS

The olive was eaten.

Šéiniata ginid.
[ˈʃei̯ni̯ata ˈginid]
šéiniata ginid
nap.PFT woman.ABS

The woman took a nap.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Lexember 17th - Yélian

ègerbica (can te'at) [ˈɛxəɾˌbiːkɐ] - to stand up (for so.)
Etymology: from ègera "to protect" + bica "to say"

Liydevon diyùidamveit nat to yáibal can tem cidiyèigerbicvet.
[la̯iːˈdeːʋɔ̈n dɨˈʃuːdɐmvɛɪ̯t nat to ˈʃaɪ̯bɐl kɐn tem kɨdˈɕɛɪ̯xəɾˌbikvɨt]
propably COND-PST-punish-COND.INV.3SG.ANIM when 3SG.MASC.POSS ex_girlfriend for 3SG.MASC.OBL NEG-COND-PST-stand_up-COND.3SG.ANIM
He would likely have been punished if his ex girlfriend had not stood up for him.

Bonus word :esp:

proteger [pɾoteˈxer] - to protect
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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Jackk
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Jackk »

17m Decembr
scavour /xaˈvur/ [çɐˈvʊː] writer; (a single) journalist, (all of) the press
< displaced former scrittour “writer” /ʃrɪtˈtur/ < Latin scrīptor in that sense in the fifteenth century, as the verb scaur /ʃor/ “to write” < Latin scalpō “I scratch, carve” displaced scrir < Latin scrībō with the same sense. It has been used of journalists in particular since the eighteenth century, a shortening of the phrase scavour de novel “newswriter”. In metonymic use for the press as a whole, it is attested since 1907 N.

A Cordoba temporane no sta fagl y við a scavour.
The life of a Cordoba journalist at that time was hard.
/a ˌkɔr.doˈba tɛmˌpo.raˈne no ˈsta ˈfɛjl i ˈvɪθ a xaˈvur/
terram impūram incolāmus
hamteu un mont sug
let us live in a dirty world
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 17

Gán Vẽi (Entry 17):

dou /ɗow˧/ (inanimate)
Noun:
1. food
2. dish, type of food
3. feed, animal food
4. prey
dou /ɗow˧/ (comparative dou ma /ɗow˧ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. edible
2. prey (of animals)
dou /ɗow˧/ (causative xā dou /ɕa˥ ɗow˧/)
Verb:
1. to eat, to consume, to ingest
2. to swallow
3. to graze (of animals)
4. to prey on (of animals)
5. (figurative) to consume, to use up, to make use of
6. (causative) to feed, to serve to

Etymology
From Old TBD dooʔ "to eat; food", from Proto-TBD *dɔɔʔ "to chew".

Example sentence:
Ngóu dou lĩ gá, mà mãu bẻ mê dou vẽ?
/ŋow˩˧ ɗow˧ li˧˩ ɣa˩˧ | ma˥˧ maw˧˩ ɓe˨˩˨ me˦˥˧ ɗow˧ ve˧˩/
[ŋɔw˩˧ ɗ̪ɔw˧ ð̞iː˧˩ ɣaː˩˧ | maː˥˧ mɑw˧˩ ɓeː˨˩˧ meː˦˥˧ ɗ̪ɔw˧ ʋeː˧˩]
ngóu dou lĩ=gá, mà mãu bẻ mê=dou=vẽ
grass eat COP=INFER, but at what 2s=eat=INT
Grass is probably edible, yeah, but why would you want to eat it?

Thedish (Entry 17):

fleish /ˈflɛɪ̯ʃ/ (plural fleishes /ˈflɛɪ̯ʃəs/)
Noun:
1. flesh
2. (rare) skin, bare skin
3. meat (especially of a land-dwelling animal)
4. (Christianity, rare) host, bread used in the Eucharist 
5. (dated) physical body
6. (dated) muscle, musculature 
7. the soft, edible parts of a fruit or vegetable 
8. (archaic) tenderness, gentleness, kindness

Alternative forms
fleesh, flesh
Etymology
From Old Thedish flēisċ, from Proto-Germanic *flaiski. Compare English flesh, North Frisian flååsch, Dutch vlees, German Fleisch, Faroese flesk.
Usage notes
fleish is typically uncountable unless different kinds of meat are being discussed. 
When referring to food, fleish typically denotes a larger piece of meat, such as a steak. 

mete /ˈmeːt/ (plural metes /ˈmeːtəs/)
Noun:
1. meat
2. ground meat, minced meat
3. (rare) sausage
4. (rare) bacon
5. (rare) cold cuts, lunchmeat
6. mincemeat, finely chopped fruit
7. mince pie
8. (archaic) feed, animal food
9. bait (for fishing)

Alternative forms
meet, mett
Etymology
From Old Thedish męte, from Proto-Germanic *matiz. Compare English meat, Danish mad.
Usage notes
While Senses 3 and 7 are countable by default, all other senses are only countable when, for instance, different kinds of meat are being compared.

Example sentence:
Mete, swea in ne burrito, does my beter dan groot, dyr fleishes lyken.
/ˈmeːt | swɛː ɪn nə bʊˈriːtɔ | duːs mʌɪ̯ ˈbeːtər dan ˈgroːt | ˈdʌɪ̯r ˈflɛɪ̯ʃəs ˈlʌɪ̯kən/
[ˈmeːt̚ | swɛ̃‿n nə bɨˈɾiːto | dʊs me ˈbeːtəɾ dɑ̃ŋ ˈgɾoːt̚ | ˈdʌɪ̯ə̆ɾ ˈfl̥ɛɪ̯ʃəs ˈlʌɪ̯kə̃n]
mete, swea in ne burrito, doe-s my beter dan groot, dyr fleish-es lyk-en
ground_meat, as in INDEF burrito, do.PRES-PRES 1s.OBL better than big, expensive meat-PL please-L.INF
I like ground meat, like in a burrito, better than large, expensive steaks.

Edit: Examples added on December 19th, 2020.
Last edited by shimobaatar on 20 Dec 2020 00:30, edited 1 time in total.
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spanick
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by spanick »

Khemehekis wrote: 17 Dec 2020 06:27 You're welcome. And I see you added some cousin terms.

What do you call nieces and nephews who are your spouse's sibling's children?
Good question! I don't know yet.

Edit: I actually got this mixed up. The children of one's same sex sibling and of your spouse's same sex sibling are your sons/daughters. The children of one's and one's spouse's opposite sex sibling are your nieces and nephews.

Lexember 17

Yemya

So, as I developed this more, I realized that I actually had an Iroquois kinship system I had in mind. As a reminder: a parallel cousin is the child of your parents' same sex sibling (paternal uncle/maternal aunt) while a cross cousin is every other kind of cousin, this includes first cousins if they're the children of your parents' opposite sex sibling. I've repeated some terms from before both to give them more refined meanings and also to show the whole system a little better.

Extended Family
phatrauya/pʰɑtɾaujɑ/ (n.) ‘paternal uncle’
phatraya/pʰɑtɾɑjɑ/ (n.) ‘paternal aunt’
matra /mɑtɾɑ/ (n.) ‘maternal aunt’
matratha/mɑtɾɑtʰɑ/ (n.) ‘maternal uncle’
brathar /bɾɑtʰɑr/ (n.) ‘brother, male parallel cousin’
svasar /sʋɑsɑr/ ‘sister, female parallel cousin’
jnayana /ʝnɑjɑnɑ/ (n.) ‘male cross cousin’
jnayanya /ʝnɑjɑnɑ/ (n.) ‘female cross cousin’

In-Laws
sveśura /sʋeɕurɑ/ (n.) ‘father-in-law’
svaśrau /sʋɑɕɾau/ (n.) ‘mother-in-law’
svaśura /sʋɑɕurɑ/ (n.) ‘brother-in-law (wife’s brother)’
svaśya /sʋɑɕjɑ/ (n.) ‘sister-in-law (wife’s sister)’
taivar /taiʋɑr/ (n.) ‘brother-in-law (husband’s brother)’
juśwa /ʝuɕʋɑ/ (n.) ‘sister-in-law (husband’s sister)’
Last edited by spanick on 17 Dec 2020 17:33, edited 2 times in total.
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Davush
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Davush »

17

Inspired by Spanick's kinship terms...

ama 'mother' (one's own)
apa 'father' (one's own)

apuna 'mother' (someone else's)
poora 'father' (someone else's)

kutsipi 'child' (one's offspring)
kiri 'child' (young person)

surim- (suriung- suriunr- suriunz-) 'to play, have fun'

nandanosa 'park, flower gardens' (nan ‘place’ + tanosa ‘flower’)

Suriungisea kiri nandanoase /suriuŋgiˈsea ˈkiri nandanoˈase/
play-IMPF-PST-3pl child park-OBL
'The children were playing in the park'

Siunroa kutsipi simua omawe /siunˈroa kuˈtsipi siˈmua oˈmawe/
drink-IRR-3sg-3sg child water river-OBL
'(My) child will drink water at the river'
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Dormouse559
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

17 lexembre - Iluhsa

héinin [ˈhei̯nin] n - child; offspring or young human (irregular PL: heiniézza; < *poine "birth" + *-en "product of")

Koubžimzar heiniénara.
[kou̯bˈʒimzar hei̯ˈni̯enara]
kòub-žim-za-r heinién-a-za
love.ABS-1S.GEN-PRED-COP children-ERG-PRED

I love my children.


I stumbled across a concept for a Silvish word that I came up with in 2013 and then forgot about. Here's the updated form:

Image Silvish

entreçhampâ [ʔɛ̃n.tʁe.hɑ̃ˈpɑː] v - to throw something that will later be retrieved

Lou ppeççheû entreçhampezirön leu ttisuvon.
[lup.pɛˈhœː ʔɛ̃n.tʁe.hɑ̃m.pəˈzi.ʁŋ̩ lœt.ti.syˈvɔ̃ŋ]
DEF-M.C.PL PL-fisherman cast-PST-3P 3P.POS PL-net

The fishermen cast their nets.

Çhakko jhoer jh' entreçhampo la balla avek mui çhen.
[hɑk.kəˈʒuʁ ʒɛ̃n.tʁəˈhɑ̃m.pə laˈbɑl.la ʔaˈvɛk mjyˈhɛ̃ŋ]
every-M.C day 1S.NOM throw-1S DEF-F ball with 1S-POS.OBL dog

I play fetch with my dog every day.

I also had ideas for the word's metaphorical uses in 2013, but I want to let those marinate a bit longer.
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 17th
kòi1 /kɔi˧/ n father
khá2 /kʰaː˥/ prep within (an object) + [NOT PREP]
bay3-yang2 /baj˧˩jaŋ˥/ v to converse about one's emotions
ğá2 /ɰaː˥/ n heart
thöğ4 /tʰəɰ˩˥/ n brain

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
mans₁-i n opponent, enemy, foreigner

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
ŋʷɯː˧˥ n 'spirit, ghost' from Proto- Hlai *Cuɦɯː 'spirit', cf. Ha Em, Bouhinhəɰ1, Moyfaw, Baisha ŋəɰ1

Sardinian
disigare v 'to pine away, to grow sad' probably from Latin DISSECO, cf. English dissect, although most other cognates appear to be learned, not directly inherited.
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

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Iyionaku
mayan
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Iyionaku »

Lexember 18th - Yélian

siyva [ˈsa̯iːʋa] - sink
Etymology: siyva "camel"; The first primitive sinks in Shelliania used a technology similar to how camels store their water, and only could store a finite amount.

Yanàlbalt pi renim teriys ritniypbit. Renut tyaifit pun siyva.
[ʃɐˈnɐlbɐl‿pi ˈɾeːnɨm ˈteːɾa̯iːs rɨtˈna̯iːbɨt | ˈreːnʉt ˈt͡ʃaɪ̯ɸɨ‿pʉn ˈsa̯iːʋɐ]
very-happy-COP.1PLEX that 1PLEX.POSS dog so-small-COP.3SG.ANIM | 1PLEX.OBL POT-wash-INV.3SG.ANIM in sink
We are very happy that our dog is so small. We can wash him in the sink.

Bonus word :esp:

lavabo [laˈβaβo] - sink
Wipe the glass. This is the usual way to start, even in the days, day and night, only a happy one.
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Dormouse559
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by Dormouse559 »

18 lexembre - Iluhsa

For today, I have a word dealing with food. I also have some conjunctions and a negative morpheme, which technically deal in relationships (between words, with the truth [:P] ).

hindi [ˈhindi] n - milk (< *pinte)

-hus [hus] conj - and; noun-phrase conjunction (< *-pus)
sa [ˈsa] conj - and, also; clause conjunction (< *sa)
déi [ˈdei̯] adv - not; negative adverb (< *doi)

Uržiònmi heiniénara hindi sa uržiònmi mama babahus kað.
[urˈʒi̯ɔnmi hei̯ˈni̯enara ˈhindi ˈsa urˈʒi̯ɔnmi ˈmama baˈbahus ˈkað]
órži-ònmi héinién-a-za hindi sa órži-ònmi mam-a bab-a=hus kað
drink-3P.NOM children-ERG-PRED milk.ABS and drink-3P.NOM mother-ERG father-ERG=and water.ABS

The children drank milk, and their mother and father drank water.

— Zióržir hindušimi? — Déi uržéġmu.
[ˈzi̯orʒir hinˈduʃimi | ˈdei̯ urˈʒeŋmu]
zé-órži-r hind<šim>i | déi órži-k=m-u
INT-drink.PFT-2S.NOM milk.ABS<1S.GEN> | NEG drink.PFT-1S.NOM=3S-ACC

— Did you drink my milk? — I did not drink it.
shimobaatar
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by shimobaatar »

Day 18

Gán Vẽi (Entry 18):

vín /vin˩˧/ (animate)
Noun:
1. ancestor, forerunner, progenitor
2. (dated) grandparent, elder
3. predecessor; the previous holder of one's position
4. originator, inventor, founder, pioneer
5. (dated) legal precedent
6. (archaic, figurative) early bird, early riser, morning person
7. (dated) precursor, harbinger, warning, herald, omen, sign, signal, prediction, premonition, prophecy
vín /vin˩˧/ (comparative vín ma /vin˩˧ ma˧/)
Adjective:
1. ancestral
2. of or pertaining to ancestors or ancestor worship
3. (dated) elderly
4. preceding, former, emeritus, ex-
5. of or relating to one's predecessors
6. original, foundational, seminal, pioneering
7. (dated) of or relating to legal precedents
8. (archaic, figurative) early, early-rising
9. (dated) warning, forewarning, foretelling, foreboding, heralding, ominous, signaling, prophetic
vín /vin˩˧/ (causative xā vín /ɕa˥ vin˩˧/)
Verb:
1. to bear, to beget, to be ancestral to
2. to precede, to train, to teach
3. to originate, to invent, to found, to pioneer
4. (dated) to set a legal precedent
5. (archaic, figurative) to arrive early, to wake up early in the morning
6. (causative) to worship, to venerate, to honor
7. (rare, informal) to retire
8. (dated) to warn, to forewarn, to foretell, to forebode, to herald, to signal, to predict, to prophesy

Etymology
From Old TBD c·pưưn "precedent, predecessor", from Proto-TBD *cɯl "before, front, early, ahead, forward" + *pɯɯ "to come, to arrive" + *nɯŋ "person, being".
Usage notes
Regarding Sense 1 of the noun, Senses 1-2 of the adjective, and Sense 1 of the verb, vín may either be used in reference to members of one's own family, especially those who had already passed away before one's birth, or to mythical "cultural ancestors".
Sense 3 of the noun, Senses 4-5 of the adjective, and Sense 2 of the verb are often used in reference to priests, monarchs, and artisans. Artisans are trained in their crafts by working under their predecessors as apprentices, and as artisans are typically well-known members of their communities, these "lines of succession" within local guilds and workshops likewise become well-known. Priesthood is essentially seen as the highest form of artisanship, and so training and succession work the same way for priests as they do for those whose crafts are more worldly. Heirs apparent similarly serve as apprentices, of sorts, to current rules, although traditionally, genetic relationships have been much more relevant to dynastic lines of succession than to those of priests or artisans.
When used, Sense 7 of the verb is most frequently causative. On top of that, it is often used reflexively, but can also be used to describe the action of purposefully ceasing to use, for example, a particular piece of old, worn-down equipment before it inevitably breaks.

Example sentence:
Xè mãu ya mãu vín mãu kháng ye nha vǐ yé.
/ɕe˥˧ maw˧˩ ja˧ maw˧˩ vin˩˧ maw˧˩ kʰaŋ˩˧ je˧ ɲa˧ vi˧˨˧ je˩˧/
[ɕeː˥˧ mɑw˧˩ jaː˧ mɑw˧˩ ʋɪ̃n̪˩˧ mɑw˧˩ k͡xɑ̃ŋ˩˧ ʝeː˧ ɲaː˧ ʋiː˧˨˧ ʝeː˩˧]
xè mãu ya mãu vín mãu kháng ye nha vǐ=yé
sleep at shade at ancestor at square PROX soft seem=HSY
The founder of this ranch liked sleeping in the shade, or so I've heard.

Thedish (Entry 18):

buersele /ˈbyːrˌseːl/ (plural buerseles /ˈbyːrˌseːl(ə)s/)
Noun:
1. bar, pub, saloon, tavern; an establishment selling alcoholic beverages and providing space for their consumption
2. (rare) any restaurant that sells alcoholic beverages
3. (rare) brewery
4. (archaic) beer hall, great hall, banquet hall

Alternative forms
buerseel, buresele
Etymology
From Old Thedish bēorsęle, from Proto-Germanic *beuzasaliz.

sellshep /ˈsɛlʃəp/ (plural sellsheps /ˈsɛlʃəps/)
Noun:
1. society, community
2. society, fellowship, foundation, association, organization, party, group, club
3. (dated) company, corporation
4. company, companionship, camaraderie, friendship, community

Alternative forms
selshep, sellship, selship
Etymology
Borrowed or calqued from (German) Low German Sellskupp. Alternatively, directly inherited from Old Thedish sællisċępe, from Proto-Germanic *saljaskapiz. Compare Saterland Frisian Sälskup, Swedish sällskap, German Gesellschaft.

Example sentence:
Y does neut drink, dow toe beurseles goaing lykes my nuw wein de sellshep.
/ʌɪ̯ duːs nœt ˈdrɪŋk | dɔʊ̯ tuː ˈbyːrˌseːləs ˈgɔːɪŋ ˈlʌɪ̯kəs mʌɪ̯ nɔʊ̯ wɛɪ̯n də ˈsɛlʃəp/
[ʔe dʊs‿nət̚ ˈdɾɪ̃ŋk̚ | do tʊ ˈbyːɾˌseːɫz ˈgɔːŋ ˈlʌɪ̯ks me no wẽn‿nə ˈsɛɫʃəp̚]
y doe-s neut drink-Ø, dow toe beurseles goaing lyk-es my nuw wein de sellshep
1s.NOM do.PRES-PRES NEG drink.PRES-S.INF, though to bar-PL go.PRES-GER like-PRES 1s.OBL still because_of DEF community
I don't drink, but I still like going to bars for the sense of community.
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qwed117
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Re: Lexember 2020

Post by qwed117 »

Lexember 18th
kú2 /kuː˥/ prep about (centered around a subject, ie 'talk about', 'focused on') [+PREP]
maj3-gua2 /maj˧˩gʷa˥/ n presence of a person (ie company)
haw1-ang2 /haw˧aŋ˥/ v to talk (about)
mül4 /mɯl˩˥/ n family
pác3 /paːt͡ʃ˧˩˥/ n emotion, feeling
e̋2 /ɤː˥/ prep to, towards

*S₁ŋ̩ʲːd-o Lat-u
dagoːr- n 'son'

Unnamed A-Posteriori Hlai-lang
kʰɯːŋ˧˥ n 'ginger' from Proto- Hlai *kʰɯːŋ 'ginger', cf. Ha Em, Bouhinkʰɯːŋ1, Nadouhua kʰeŋ1[

Sardinian
diciosu adj 'happy, lucky' from Spanish dichoso from Latin DICTA
Spoiler:
My minicity is Zyphrazia and Novland
What is made of man will crumble away.

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